Appendix E
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Sanford A. Miller, Ph.D., Chair, is a senior fellow at the Joint Institute for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition at the University of Maryland, College Park. In December 2000, he was named professor and dean emeritus of the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, where he was the dean of the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences and professor in the Departments of Biochemistry and Medicine from 1987 to 2000. He is the former director of the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Previously, he was a professor of nutritional biochemistry at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Miller has served on many national and international government and professional society advisory committees, including as chair of the Joint Food and Agriculture Organization-World Health Organization (FAO-WHO) Expert Consultation on the Application of Risk Analysis to Food Standards Issues. His honors include the Conrad A. Elvehjem Award of the American Institute of Nutrition, the Babcock-Hart Award of the Institute of Food Technology, the Esther Peterson Consumer Service Award from the Food Marketing Institute, the Sterling B. Hendricks Award from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and election to fellow of the American Society for Nutrition. In June 2000, he was the recipient of the FDA’s Distinguished Alumni Award. He has been a member of many National Academy of Sciences committees, including the Food and Nutrition Board’s Standing Committee on the Scientific Evaluation of Dietary Reference Intakes, Subcommittee on Upper Reference Levels of Nutrients, and Panel on Macronutrients. He was named a national associate of the National Academies in 2002. He is author or coauthor of more than 200 original scientific publications. Dr.



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84 APPENDIX E Miller received a B.S. in chemistry from the City College of New York, and an M.S. and a Ph.D. from Rutgers University in physiology and biochemistry. Gary R. Acuff, M.S., Ph.D., is a professor of food microbiology and the head of the Department of Animal Science at Texas A&M University. He is also a member of the faculty of Food Science and the Graduate Faculty. His professional memberships include the American Society for Microbiology, the Society for Applied Microbiology, and the International Association for Food Protection (IAFP). He serves on several advising and planning committees for the above professional organizations and served as president of IAFP in 2007-2008. He was a member of the Editorial Committee for the fourth edition of the Compendium of Methods for the Microbiological Examination of Foods, published in 2001, and served as a member of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Advisory Committee on Microbiological Criteria for Foods from 1992 to 1997. He received his B.S. in biology from Abilene Christian University, and his M.S. and Ph.D. in food science and technology from Texas A&M University. Robert L. Buchanan, Ph.D., is the director of the University of Maryland’s Center for Food Safety and Security Systems. He has 30 years of experience in teaching, conducting research in food safety, and working at the interface between science and public health policy, first in academia, then in government service in both USDA and FDA, and most recently at the University of Maryland. His scientific interests include extensive experience in predictive microbiology, quantitative microbial risk assessment, microbial physiology, mycotoxicology, and HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point) systems. He has published on a broad range of subjects related to food safety and is one of the codevelopers of the widely used USDA Pathogen Modeling Program. Dr. Buchanan has served on numerous national and international advisory bodies, including serving as a permanent member of the International Commission on Microbiological Specification for Foods, the U.S. delegate to the Codex Alimentarius Committee on Food Hygiene for 10 years, a six-term member of the USDA National Advisory Committee on Microbiological Criteria for Foods, and the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Committee on Emerging Threats to Public Health. As a member of ConAgra’s Food Safety Advisory Council, he provides scientific advice on HACCP and other food safety systems. He received his B.S., M.S., M.Phil., and Ph.D. in food science from Rutgers

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APPENDIX E 85 University, and postdoctoral training in mycotoxicology at the University of Georgia. Michael P. Doyle, Ph.D., is regents professor of food microbiology and director of the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety. Previously, he was distinguished professor of food microbiology and toxicology at the University of Wisconsin. Dr. Doyle's research program promotes collaboration among the food industry, the university, and federal and state agencies. His research focuses on developing methods to detect and control foodborne bacterial pathogens at all levels of the food continuum, from the farm to the table. He is internationally acknowledged as a leading authority on foodborne pathogens, especially Escherichia coli O157:H7, and consults widely on the topic. As a member of ConAgra's Food Safety Advisory Council, he provides scientific advice on food safety. His National Academies service includes chairmanship of the Committee on the Review of the USDA Escherichia coli 0157:H7 Farm- to-Table Process Risk Assessment and participation in the 2004 and 2007 U.S.-Iranian Workshop on Food Safety, the National Research Council (NRC) Committee on National Needs for Research in Veterinary Science, and the IOM-NRC Committee to Ensure Safe Food from Production to Consumption. Dr. Doyle is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he received his B.S. in bacteriology, and his M.S. and Ph.D. in food microbiology. He is currently vice chair of the Food and Nutrition Board (FNB) and chairs the FNB Food Forum. He was elected to the IOM in 2003. John J. Maurer, Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Population Health and the Poultry Diagnostic and Research Center, and a member of the Center for Food Safety, at the University of Georgia. He is a member of the American Association of Avian Pathologists and the American Society for Microbiology, for which he has served as president of the Southeastern Branch. He was the recipient of the Pfizer Award for Research Excellence and the John Bowen Award for Excellence in Research. His research interests include the development, validation, and implementation of molecular tools into on-farm surveillance programs for foodborne pathogens; molecular epidemiology and population genetics of veterinary and zoonotic pathogens; and the ecology of antibiotic resistance and foodborne pathogens in the food production environment. Dr. Maurer has a B.S. in microbiology from Purdue University and a Ph.D. in microbiology from the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio.

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86 APPENDIX E Craig A. Reed, D.V.M., is a visiting professor, Large Animal Clinical Sciences, at the Virginia-Maryland (VA-MD) Regional College of Veterinary Medicine. He also serves as vice chair of the Virginia Board of Health. He has worked with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, where he crafted policy and delivered food safety programs involving meat, poultry and egg products, fruits, and vegetables. He served as the administrator of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service and associate administrator of the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) and as the director of the Food, Nutrition and Health Institute at Virginia Tech from 2001 to 2003. He has designed and implemented programs such as HACCP in meat, poultry, and egg products and the Pesticide Data Program in fruits and vegetables. Dr. Reed received his B.S. and D.V.M. from Michigan State University. Steven C. Ricke, M.S., Ph.D., is a professor in the Departments of Food Science and Poultry Science at the University of Arkansas. He also serves as the Donald “Buddy” Wray Chair in Food Safety and the director of the Center for Food Safety in the Institute of Food Science and Engineering. Dr. Ricke is a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Chemical Society, the American Society for Microbiology, the International Association for Food Protection, the Poultry Science Association, and the Society for Industrial Microbiology. His research interests include food safety; Salmonella pathogenesis, genetics, and physiology; food fermentations; and gastrointestinal microbiology. Dr. Ricke received his B.S. and M.S. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin. Juliana M. Ruzante, D.V.M., M.P.V.M., Ph.D., is the risk analysis manager for the Joint Institute for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition in College Park, Maryland. She worked for the University of Guelph and the Public Health Agency of Canada developing and operationalizing a multifactorial framework to rank foodborne risks using multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA), and at the Western Institute for Food Safety and Security developing training material on animal health and food safety. She also worked as a quality assurance specialist for one of the largest pork and poultry processing companies in Brazil. She was a member of the Food Safety Research Consortium and has served as an expert on the meeting organized by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and the World Health Organization

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APPENDIX E 87 on the risks associated with Enterobacter sakazakii. Dr. Ruzante received her D.V.M. from the University of São Paulo and her master’s in preventive veterinary medicine and Ph.D. in comparative pathology from the University of California, Davis. Robert Tauxe, M.D., M.P.H., is deputy director of the Division of Foodborne, Bacterial and Mycotic Diseases at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. His division is charged with prevention and control of foodborne and zoonotic bacterial infections and mycotic diseases. His faculty appointments include the Department of Global Health and the Department of Biology, both at Emory University. Dr. Tauxe’s interests include bacterial enteric diseases, epidemiology and pathogenesis of infectious diseases, epidemiologic and clinical consequences of bacterial genetic exchange, antimicrobial use and resistance to antimicrobial agents, and teaching epidemiologic methods. Dr. Tauxe’s memberships include the American Epidemiology Society, the American Society for Microbiology, and the American Academy of Microbiology; he is a fellow of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. Dr. Tauxe has served internationally in Belgium, Mali, Rwanda, Peru, and Guatemala and has supervised numerous overseas epidemiologic investigations. Dr. Tauxe has authored or coauthored 242 journal articles, letters, and book chapters. Dr. Tauxe received his B.S. from Yale University, his M.D. from Vanderbilt Medical School, and his M.P.H. from Yale University. Consultant Kerri Harris, Ph.D., is an associate professor in the Department of Animal Science at Texas A&M University, serves as director of the Center for Food Safety, and is president and CEO of the International HACCP Alliance. Prior to becoming the president and CEO of the HACCP Alliance, she served as associate director and helped standardize HACCP training programs, assisted with the development of the train- the-trainer course and the accreditation program for HACCP training providers. At Texas A&M University, Dr. Harris team-teaches a HACCP course for graduate/undergraduate students and coordinates various HACCP and food safety industry training programs. She has worked closely with the food industry to provide valuable assistance in implementing HACCP programs. Dr. Harris has published multiple refereed journal articles and other publications, co-authored two book chapters, and presented at multiple national meetings. She is an active

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88 APPENDIX E member in the American Meat Science Association, the American Dietetic Association, and the Institute of Food Technologists. Awards include the Department of Animal Science “Outstanding Service Award” in 1993 for her contributions to the nutrition and meat science programs and the Vice Chancellor's Award in Excellence for Industry-Agency- Association Partnerships in December 2000. Dr Harris received her B.S. in food science, M.S. in nutrition, and doctorate in nutrition from Texas A&M University.

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Review of the Use of Process Control Indicators in the FSIS Public Health Risk-Based Inspection System: A Letter Report member in the American Meat Science Association, the American Dietetic Association, and the Institute of Food Technologists. Awards include the Department of Animal Science “Outstanding Service Award” in 1993 for her contributions to the nutrition and meat science programs and the Vice Chancellor's Award in Excellence for Industry-Agency-Association Partnerships in December 2000. Dr Harris received her B.S. in food science, M.S. in nutrition, and doctorate in nutrition from Texas A&M University.