Appendix A
Biographic Information on the Committee on Contaminated Drinking Water at Camp Lejeune

David A. Savitz (Chair) is the Charles W. Bluhdorn Professor in the Department of Community and Preventive Medicine at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine. He also serves as director of the Disease Prevention and Public Health Institute. His research interests are in reproductive, environmental, and cancer epidemiology. Dr. Savitz was president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and the Society for Pediatric and Perinatal Epidemiologic Research and was the North American regional councilor for the International Epidemiological Association. He has served on several Institute of Medicine (IOM) and National Research Council committees, including being chair of the Committee on Making Best Use of the Agent Orange Exposure Reconstruction Model. Past service includes the Committee on EPA’s Exposure and Human Health Reassessment of TCDD and Related Compounds and the Committee on Understanding Premature Birth and Assuring Health Outcomes. He serves on the Committee to Reexamine IOM Pregnancy Weight Guidelines. Dr. Savitz received his MS in preventive medicine from Ohio State University and his PhD in epidemiology from the University of Pittsburgh. He was elected to membership in IOM in 2007.


Caroline L. Baier-Anderson is a health scientist with the Environmental Defense Fund and an assistant professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine of the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB). Her research interests are in the use of science in risk assessment and environmental decision-making, exposure assessment, multistakeholder problem-solving for complex environmental issues, and risk communication. Past work has included providing technical outreach assistance to communities adjacent to hazardous-waste sites and working with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Army on the cleanup of Superfund sites at Aberdeen Proving Ground. She has consulted on risk assessments of solvent-contaminated groundwater. Dr. Baier-Anderson received her PhD in toxicology from UMB.


James V. Bruckner is a professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Sciences of the University of Georgia College of Pharmacy. His research interests are in the pharmacokinetics and toxicologic and carcinogenic potential of volatile organic compounds, including trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene. His current efforts are directed toward developing physiologically based pharmacokinetic models of TCE and its interactions with alcohol. Dr. Bruckner has served on several National Research Council committees, including the Committee on Acute Exposure Guideline Levels and the Committee on Use of Third Party Toxicity Research with Human Test Subjects. He received his MS from the University of Texas at Austin and his PhD in toxicology from the University of Michigan.


Prabhakar Clement is a professor of environmental engineering and Arthur H. Feagin Chair of Civil Engineering at Auburn University. Before joining the university, he worked as a senior research engineer



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Appendix A Biographic Information on the Committee on Contaminated Drinking Water at Camp Lejeune David A. Savitz (Chair) is the Charles W. Bluhdorn Professor in the Department of Community and Pre- ventive Medicine at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine. He also serves as director of the Disease Pre- vention and Public Health Institute. His research interests are in reproductive, environmental, and cancer epidemiology. Dr. Savitz was president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and the Society for Pediatric and Perinatal Epidemiologic Research and was the North American regional councilor for the International Epidemiological Association. He has served on several Institute of Medicine (IOM) and Na- tional Research Council committees, including being chair of the Committee on Making Best Use of the Agent Orange Exposure Reconstruction Model. Past service includes the Committee on EPA’s Exposure and Human Health Reassessment of TCDD and Related Compounds and the Committee on Understand- ing Premature Birth and Assuring Health Outcomes. He serves on the Committee to Reexamine IOM Pregnancy Weight Guidelines. Dr. Savitz received his MS in preventive medicine from Ohio State Uni- versity and his PhD in epidemiology from the University of Pittsburgh. He was elected to membership in IOM in 2007. Caroline L. Baier-Anderson is a health scientist with the Environmental Defense Fund and an assistant professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine of the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB). Her research interests are in the use of science in risk assessment and environmental decision-making, exposure assessment, multistakeholder problem-solving for complex environmental issues, and risk communication. Past work has included providing technical outreach assistance to com- munities adjacent to hazardous-waste sites and working with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Army on the cleanup of Superfund sites at Aberdeen Proving Ground. She has con- sulted on risk assessments of solvent-contaminated groundwater. Dr. Baier-Anderson received her PhD in toxicology from UMB. James V. Bruckner is a professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Sciences of the University of Georgia College of Pharmacy. His research interests are in the pharmacokinetics and toxi- cologic and carcinogenic potential of volatile organic compounds, including trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene. His current efforts are directed toward developing physiologically based pharma- cokinetic models of TCE and its interactions with alcohol. Dr. Bruckner has served on several National Research Council committees, including the Committee on Acute Exposure Guideline Levels and the Committee on Use of Third Party Toxicity Research with Human Test Subjects. He received his MS from the University of Texas at Austin and his PhD in toxicology from the University of Michigan. Prabhakar Clement is a professor of environmental engineering and Arthur H. Feagin Chair of Civil Engineering at Auburn University. Before joining the university, he worked as a senior research engineer 237

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Contaminated Water Supplies at Camp Lejeune—Assessing Potential Health Effects 238 at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for 6 years and then as a senior lecturer in the Department of Environmental Engineering at the University of Western Australia for 3 years. His research interests are in modeling of water flow and reactive-contaminant transport in groundwater systems, bioremediation of contaminated aquifers, numerical modeling of environmental processes, water-quality modeling, and op- timal design of treatment systems. He is a member of the Groundwater Quality Committee of the Ameri- can Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) and served as the associate editor of ASCE’s Journal of Hydro- logic Engineering and the Journal of Contaminant Hydrology. Dr. Clement received his MSc in physics from Madurai University, his MTech in environmental sciences and engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay, and his PhD in civil engineering from Auburn University. He is a registered pro- fessional civil engineer. Carole A. Kimmel is a consultant in toxicology and risk assessment, particularly in reproductive and de- velopmental effects. She was a senior scientist for 20 years with the National Center for Environmental Assessment at the U.S, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). She spent her career at EPA working on advances in risk assessment for noncancer health effects, including reproductive and developmental toxic- ity and neurotoxicity. Dr. Kimmel cochaired the Developmental Disorders Working Group of the Presi- dent’s Task Force on Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks to Children and was a leader in an interagency effort to plan and implement the National Children’s Study. She is a former president of the Teratology Society and of the Reproductive and Developmental Toxicology Specialty Section of the So- ciety of Toxicology. Her current consulting work includes a part-time position with Exponent as a senior managing scientist and continued involvement in the National Children’s Study. Dr. Kimmel received her PhD in anatomy and teratology from the University of Cincinnati. Francine Laden is an assistant professor of environmental epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health and assistant professor of medicine at the Channing Laboratory of Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School. Her research interests are in the environmental epidemiology of cancer and respiratory disease. Her current research is focused on analyses of the relationship between organochlori- nes and non-Hodgkin lymphoma and Parkinson disease; lung cancer and cardiovascular mortality and diesel exhaust in the Trucking Industry Particle Study; ambient air pollution and cardiopulmonary disease in the Nurses’ Health Study; and mortality followup in the Harvard Six Cities Study. Dr. Laden was a member of the Institute of Medicine Committee on Gulf War and Health: Review of the Medical Litera- ture Relative to Gulf War Veterans’ Health. She received her MS in environmental health management and her ScD in epidemiology from the Harvard School of Public Health. Bruce P. Lanphear is a senior scientist at the Child & Family Research Institute and professor of Chil- dren's Environmental Health at Simon Fraser University, both in British Columbia, Canada. He is the principal investigator for a study of fetal and early-childhood exposure to prevalent environmental neuro- toxins—including lead, alcohol, pesticides, mercury, polychlorinated biphenyls, and environmental to- bacco smoke—funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Dr. Lanphear has conducted numerous epidemiologic studies and randomized controlled trials of environmental hazards, including the use of high-efficiency particulate air cleaners to reduce asthma symptoms and lead-hazard controls to prevent childhood lead exposure. His research also explores gene-environment interactions to enhance understanding of susceptibility to environmental pol- lutants. He recently served on EPA’s Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee for the national ambient air quality lead standard. He received his MD from the University of Missouri-Kansas City, and his MPH from the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. Xiaomei Ma is an assistant professor in the Department of Epidemiology of the Yale School of Public Health. Her research interests are in the epidemiology of malignancies of the human hematopoietic sys- tem. Specifically, she is interested in environmental and genetic factors in the etiology of childhood leu- kemia, the epidemiology of myeloproliferative disorders, and methodologic issues in the design of epi-

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Appendix A 239 demiologic studies. Dr. Ma received her MS from Shanghai Medical University and her PhD in epidemi- ology from the University of California, Berkeley. John R. Nuckols is a professor in the Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences of Colorado State University. He is also director of the Environmental Health Advanced Systems Labora- tory. His research interests are in exposure assessment in population-based environmental health studies using computer simulation modeling and spatial information systems. Dr. Nuckols received his MS in civil engineering from Northwestern University and his PhD in engineering from the University of Ken- tucky. Andrew F. Olshan is a professor in and chair of the Department of Epidemiology of the University of North Carolina School of Public Health. His research interests are in the etiology of birth defects and can- cer in children. His recent work has focused on the role of paternal exposure and adverse health effects in children, risk factors for birth defects and Wilms tumor in children, and the effects of drinking-water dis- infection byproducts on male reproductive health. He has served on several Institute of Medicine commit- tees, most recently the Committee for Review of Evidence Regarding Link between Exposure to Agent Orange and Diabetes. Dr. Olshan received his MS and PhD in epidemiology from the University of Washington. Lianne Sheppard is a professor in the Department of Biostatistics and the Department of Occupational and Environmental Health Sciences at the University of Washington School of Public Health. She is also an affiliate member of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. She is an elected fellow of the American Statistical Association and serves as an expert panelist on the ozone, NOx, and SOx review pan- els the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee. Her scientific interests include estimating the health effects of occupational and environmental exposures, air-pollution health effects, observational-study design, and group information in observational studies. She is an active co-investigator in several occupational-health and environmental-health studies, particularly in air pollu- tion and occupational noise exposure. Her statistical-methods research addresses the role of exposure and study design in estimating health effects in observational studies. Dr. Sheppard received her ScM in bio- statistics from Johns Hopkins University and her PhD from the University of Washington. Elaine Symanski is an associate professor in the Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control of the University of Texas School of Public Health. Her research interests are in the development and applica- tion of quantitatively based approaches for evaluating occupational and environmental exposure, retro- spective exposure assessment, and investigation of health effects associated with exposure in workplace and community settings. Dr. Symanski received her MSPH and PhD in environmental sciences and engi- neering from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Janice W. Yager is an adjunct professor in the Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Epidemiol- ogy and Statistics, of the University of New Mexico School of Medicine. Her current research interests are in application of biomarkers in epidemiology and the development and impact of increased knowledge in toxic modes of action on reducing uncertainties in risk assessment with specific interest in solvents and metals. Before joining the university, she initiated, managed, and provided scientific contributions to re- search programs and projects in environmental and occupational health sciences at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). Before joining EPRI, Dr. Yager was associate research toxicologist and lec- turer in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences of the School of Public Health of the Univer- sity of California, Berkeley and was a National Institutes of Health visiting scientist to the Academy of Finland. She has served as president and member of the Executive Committee of the Genetic and Envi- ronmental Toxicology Association, on the Board of Councilors of the Environmental Mutagen Society, and on a number of scientific advisory committees, including the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists Biological Exposure Indices Committee and the U.S. Environmental Protection

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Contaminated Water Supplies at Camp Lejeune—Assessing Potential Health Effects 240 Agency (EPA) External Program Peer Review Committee Carcinogenesis Section. Dr. Yager was a member of the National Research Council Committee on Human Health Risks of Trichloroethylene and EPA’s Scientific Advisory Board Arsenic Review Panel. She received her MPH and PhD in environ- mental health sciences from the University of California, Berkeley.