achieving high market penetration, and it outlines some of the experience gained with key policies and programs aimed at overcoming these barriers.

1.1
ENERGY USE IN THE UNITED STATES

The United States is the world’s largest consumer of energy. In 2008 it used 99.4 quadrillion Btu (99 quads) of primary energy (Figure 1.1), 20 percent of world consumption. The next largest user, China, accounted for 15 percent of world consumption, but its per capita use was less than one-fifth that of the United

FIGURE 1.1 Total U.S. energy use by sector, 2008 (in quadrillion Btu, or quads). For each sector, total energy use is direct (primary) fuel use plus purchased electricity plus apportioned electricity-system losses. Economy-wide, total U.S. primary energy use in 2008 was 99.4 quads. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

FIGURE 1.1 Total U.S. energy use by sector, 2008 (in quadrillion Btu, or quads). For each sector, “total energy use” is direct (primary) fuel use plus purchased electricity plus apportioned electricity-system losses. Economy-wide, total U.S. primary energy use in 2008 was 99.4 quads. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

Source: EIA 2009a, as updated by EIA, 2009b.



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