Appendix A
Committee Biographies

Linda P.B. Katehi (chair) is chancellor of the University of California, Davis. Previously, she served as provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; the John Edwardson Dean of Engineering and professor of electrical and computer engineering at Purdue University; and associate dean for academic affairs and graduate education in the College of Engineering and professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the University of Michigan. Professor Katehi led the effort to establish the Purdue School of Engineering Education, the first department at a U.S. university focused explicitly on engineering education, particularly on K–12 engineering curricula, standards, and teacher education. The author or coauthor of 10 book chapters, she has published more than 600 articles in refereed journals and symposia proceedings and owns 16 patents. She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), a fellow and board member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, chair of the Nominations Committees for the National Medal of Science and National Medal of Technology and Innovation, and a member of the Kauffman National Panel for Entrepreneurship. She is currently a member of a number of NAE/National Academy of Sciences committees and the Advisory Committee for Harvard Radcliffe College and a member of the Engineering Advisory Committees for Caltech, the University of Washington, and the University of California, Los Angeles.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 181
Appendix A Committee Biographies Linda P.B. Katehi (chair) is chancellor of the University of California, Davis. Previously, she served as provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; the John Edwardson Dean of Engineering and professor of electrical and computer engineering at Purdue University; and associate dean for academic affairs and graduate education in the College of Engineering and professor of electrical engineer- ing and computer science at the University of Michigan. Professor Katehi led the effort to establish the Purdue School of Engineering Education, the first department at a U.S. university focused explicitly on engineering education, particularly on K–12 engineering curricula, standards, and teacher educa- tion. The author or coauthor of 10 book chapters, she has published more than 600 articles in refereed journals and symposia proceedings and owns 16 patents. She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), a fellow and board member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, chair of the Nominations Committees for the National Medal of Science and National Medal of Technology and Innovation, and a member of the Kauffman National Panel for Entrepreneurship. She is currently a member of a number of NAE/National Academy of Sciences committees and the Advisory Committee for Harvard Radcliffe College and a member of the Engineering Advisory Committees for Caltech, the University of Washing- ton, and the University of California, Los Angeles. 181

OCR for page 181
182 ENGINEERING IN K–12 EDUCATION Lynn Basham received her B.S. in 1977 and M.S. in 1985 from the Univer- sity of Southern Mississippi and completed her doctoral work in 2006 at Louisiana State University. As a state specialist for technology education at the Virginia Department of Education, she is responsible for curriculum projects and the development of new initiatives. Ms. Basham has received many professional honors and has been active in professional organizations throughout her career. From 2000 to 2002, she was Region 2 representative for the International Technology Education Association (ITEA) Board of Directors and was recently president of the ITEA Council for Supervisors (CS). She was awarded the ITEA-CS Distinguished Service Award in 2004 and the ITEA-CS Outstanding State Supervisor Award in 1992 and 2001. Ms. Basham is also a member of the Mississippi Valley Technology Teacher Education Conference, a member and past president of the Southeastern Technology Education Conference, and a member of the Association for Career and Technical Education, American Association for Training and Development, and American Society for Curriculum Development. She is currently working on the U.S. Department of Energy Real World Design Challenge. M. David Burghardt is a professor of engineering, a licensed professional engineer in New York, and a Chartered Engineer in the United Kingdom. He is also co-director of the Hofstra University Center for Technological Literacy (CTL), which he established in 1989, and the author of 11 books on engineering and secondary-school technology education. Since 1993, through CTL, he has won seven major National Science Foundation grants for work on improving technological literacy. Dr. Burghardt’s particular interest is in how engineering design can promote student learning in math- ematics and science, especially for lower performing students. In addition to developing engineering courses at the university level, he was co-creator of a master’s degree program for in-service teachers, which now has more than 300 graduates. Kathleen Conn, assistant professor at Neumann College in the Division of Human Services, is a scientist, educator, and former school administrator. She earned her Ph.D. in physics/biology at Bryn Mawr College, completed postdoctoral work at Lankenau Medical Research Center in Philadelphia, and took her legal training at Widener University School of Law. She was a participant and leader in the Thayer School of Engineering (Dartmouth College) “Engineering Concepts in the High School Classroom” Program,

OCR for page 181
APPENDIX A 183 which trains mathematics and science teachers to use problem-solving approaches. Dr. Conn has been a delegate to international conferences on physics education and a member of the Advisory Council for the Mechanical Universe High School Adaptation (MUHSA) and the Comprehensive Con- ceptual Curriculum for Physics (C3P), two pre-college physics curriculum projects sponsored by the National Science Foundation. She is also an adjunct professor at Widener University School of Law, Wilmington, Delaware. Alan G. Gomez, an instructor at the University of Wisconsin College of Engineering, and an engineering instructor and career and technical edu- cation coordinator for the Sun Prairie Area School District. He received his B.S. in Technology Education from the University of Wisconsin-Stout in 1995, his M.S. in Industrial/Technology Education from Stout in 2004, and a Ph.D. in Industrial and Systems Engineering from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2008. He has written a National Foundations of Technology curriculum and a National Introduction to Engineering cur- riculum for the International Technology Education Association Center to Advance the Teaching of Technology and Science. A member of the team writing technology education standards for the state of Wisconsin, he has published materials in professional journals and in the Proceedings of the American Society for Engineering Education. Dr. Gomez is principal author of Engineering Your Future: A Project-Based Introduction to Engineering and Survey of Engineering. Craig Kesselheim is currently senior associate for the Great Schools Partner- ship in Maine, where he not only assists and consults with secondary schools on reform initiatives, but also directs a three-year math science partnership of three public schools, a career and technical school, and a community college. Previous positions include director of curriculum and staff develop- ment for Maine School Union 98; principal of Tremont Consolidated School (K–8) in Bass Harbor, Maine; assistant professor of biology at the University of Central Arkansas; and science facilitator for the Maine Mathematics and Science Alliance. Dr. Kesselheim earned his B.A. from College of the Atlantic and an M.A.T. from Bridgewater State College. He earned his Ph.D. in science education from the University of Maine in 1997. Michael C. Lach, officer of high school teaching and learning, oversees cur- riculum and instruction in 120 high schools in the Chicago School System. Mr. Lach began teaching high school biology and general science at Alceé

OCR for page 181
184 ENGINEERING IN K–12 EDUCATION Fortier Senior High School in New Orleans in 1990 as a charter member of Teach for America. After three years, he became director of program design for Teach for America, where he developed a portfolio-based alternative- certification system that was adopted by several states. He subsequently returned to teaching science, first in New York and then in Chicago. In 1995, Radio Shack named him one of the Top 100 Technology Teachers; the same year he was named Illinois Physics Teacher of the Year. As an Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellow, he was advisor to Congressman Vernon Ehlers (R-MI) on science, technology, and education. He was also lead curriculum developer of ‘‘Investigations in Environmental Science” (It’s About Time, Inc.), and has written extensively about science teaching and learning for The Science Teacher, The American Biology Teacher, Scientific American, and other publications. He earned a bachelor’s degree in physics from Carleton College and master’s degrees from Columbia University and Northeastern Illinois University. Richard Lehrer is professor of science education in the Peabody College of Teaching and Learning at Vanderbilt University. Previously, at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, he was associate director of the National Center for Improving Student Learning and Achievement in Mathematics and Science. He collaborates with teachers to develop, implement, and assess modeling of mathematics and sciences in the elementary grades and works with engi- neers and science educators at City College of New York to conduct studies of engineering design in the elementary grades. A former high school science teacher, he has pioneered classroom research on using cognitive technologies as tools for teaching mathematics, science, and literacy. He was a member of the National Research Council Committee on the Foundations of Assess- ment and Systems for State Science Assessment. Deborah McGriff has worked for almost four decades to transform the lives of underserved urban school students. Currently, she is president of the Education Industry Association, an association of providers of educa- tion services; a member of the Advisory Board of the National Council on Teacher Quality; a founder and national board member of the Black Alli- ance for Educational Options; and a member of the Advisory Board of the Program on Education Policy and Governance at the Harvard University John F. Kennedy School of Government. She is also a partner at NewSchools Venture Fund, where she works on investment strategy and quality teach- ing. In 1993, after years of working as an administrator for public school

OCR for page 181
APPENDIX A 185 systems in Detroit, Cambridge, Massachusetts, Milwaukee, and New York, she became the first public school superintendent to join EdisonLearning (formerly Edison Schools), where she held numerous positions, including president of Edison Teachers College and executive vice president of charter schools. She has a bachelor’s degree in education with a minor in history from Norfolk State University, a master’s degree in education, with a spe- cialization in ready pedagogy from Queens College of the City University of New York, and a doctorate in administration, policy, and urban education from Fordham University. Roland (Rollie) J. Otto is Director of Education Outreach and the Global Teacher Academy for the Berkeley Center for Cosmological Physics at the University of California, Berkeley. From 1988 to 2006, he was head of the Center for Science and Engineering Education at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and from 1995 to 1998, he was executive director of the California Science Project, a statewide teacher professional-development network. From 1986 to 1988, he was assistant director of the Lawrence Hall of Science at the University of California, Berkeley. In 2001–2002, Dr. Otto was a member of the Science Subject Matter Committee, California Com- mission for Teacher Credentialing, which establishes subject-matter content standards for science teachers. He was also principle writer and advisor for the California Science Framework Committee (2000-2001) and chair of the Content Review Panel for the science instructional-materials adoption pro- cess (1999). He has a Ph.D. in nuclear/physical chemistry from Purdue and a B.S. in chemistry from Valparaiso University. He did his postgraduate work with Nobelist Glenn T. Seaborg. Richard J. Schaar, an executive advisor at Texas Instruments (TI), recently retired from his post as a senior vice president of TI, where he was math and science education policy advisor for the corporation. Under his guidance, TI developed educator-support services, including technology training, to increase teachers’ confidence and ability to integrate technology education into their classrooms. Dr. Schaar served on the National Science Foundation (NSF) Advisory Committee of the Directorate for Education and Human Resources and chaired the Subcommittee on the Instructional Workforce. He extended TI’s commitment to education by partnering with NSF on educational initiatives, including serving as the leading corporate sponsor of the Urban Systemic Programs, Model Institutions for Excellence, and the Superintendents’ Coalition. Under his leadership, TI supports an executive

OCR for page 181
186 ENGINEERING IN K–12 EDUCATION director for the Benjamin Banneker Association and helped establish the Dorothy Strong Scholarship for Professional Development. He holds a B.S. from Purdue University, an M.B.A. from the University of Illinois, and a Ph.D. in applied mathematics from the University of Chicago. Dr. Schaar has also received a Woodrow Wilson Fellowship and an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship. Mark Schroll joined the Kern Family Foundation in August, 2007, where he is program coordinator for engineering and innovation programs, includ- ing Project Lead the Way (PLTW). As a member of the original staff of the Science Academy of South Texas, he co-authored and implemented PLTW, a unique four-year pre-engineering curriculum, and later worked to imple- ment a PLTW program at his school. From 2001 to 2007 he was a PLTW teacher trainer for two courses, Digital Electronics and Engineering Design and Development. Drawing on his experience with pre-engineering cur- ricula and instruction, he collaborates with grant-management staff on the application-review and grant-monitoring processes. He also works closely with grantees to develop networks of strong partnerships and sustainability plans. Christian D. Schunn is an associate professor of psychology and a research scientist in the Learning Research and Development Center at the University of Pittsburgh. His basic research involves studying experts and novices in complex domains, such as science, engineering, submarining, and weather forecasting, to develop theoretical and computational models of cognition underlying expert performance and the difficulties of developing expert- like performance. His applied research involves developing and evaluating tools and curricula to help novices achieve expert performance. Dr. Schunn has developed design-based learning curricula for middle and high school science classrooms that have been found to be more successful than existing hands-on and textbook science curricula at teaching basic science concepts and scientific reasoning skills and stimulating interest in engineering, sci- ence, and technology careers. He received his Ph.D. from Carnegie Mellon University in 1995. Jacquelyn F. Sullivan, associate dean for student cultivation, College of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Colorado (UC) at Boulder, heads the college diversity, recruitment, and retention programs. A founding co-director of the Integrated Teaching and Learning Program and Labora-

OCR for page 181
APPENDIX A 187 tory, Dr. Sullivan was a driving force behind this hands-on K–16 learning initiative, which now serves more than 4,000 undergraduate engineering students annually. For this work, she was a co-recipient of the 2008 Bernard M. Gordon Prize for Innovation in Engineering and Technology Educa- tion from the National Academy of Engineering, and in 2005, she received the inaugural Lifetime Achievement Award from the K–12 Division of the American Society of Engineering Education. She also directs the TEAMS Program (Tomorrow’s Engineering—creAte. iMagine. Succeed), funded by the National Science Foundation, and was a co-developer of a retention- building First-Year Engineering Projects course at UC Boulder. Dr. Sullivan is a founding board member of the Denver School of Science and Technology, a public, urban high school that incorporates science, engineering, and tech- nology into a humanities-rich setting focused on student achievement. Her articles have appeared in Science, The Bridge, and many other publications. She received her Ph.D. in environmental health physics and toxicology from Purdue University and has 14 years of engineering experience in the energy and software industries and nine years of experience as director of a water resources and environmental engineering research center. Robin Willner is vice president, Global Community Initiatives, for IBM, which she joined in 1994 to design and implement Reinventing Education, a $90 million philanthropic initiative that promotes K–12 school reform through grant partnerships with school districts and states to develop new applications of technology to overcome common barriers to school improve- ment and raise the level of student achievement. She also oversees a range of philanthropic and volunteer programs and was project manager for the 2001, 1999, and 1996 National Education Summits, which were co-hosted by IBM. She was instrumental in the initial planning and start-up of Achieve Inc., a national education organization for standards-based reform. Prior to joining IBM, Ms. Willner was executive director for strategic planning/research and development for the New York City Public Schools. She is a member of the boards of directors of the National Center for Educational Accountability, Grantmakers for Education, and Center for Education Policy in Washington, D.C. She was a member of the U.S. Department of Education Expert Panel on Educational Technology from 1999 to 2000. She graduated from Columbia University with a degree in urban affairs.

OCR for page 181