A
Biosketches of Committee Members

David J. Nash, Chair, has more than four decades of experience in building, design, and program management for both the U.S. Navy and the private sector. His experience includes the management of multibillion-dollar physical asset programs, including the U.S. Navy’s shore installations worldwide and the reconstruction of Iraq’s infrastructure. He is the president of Dave Nash and Associates, LLC, a company focused on project development and execution in emerging markets and in the United States. He was previously the president of government operations for the international engineering firm of BE&K, Inc., headquartered in Birmingham, Alabama.

Prior to joining BE&K, Admiral Nash served as director of the Iraq Program Management Office under the Coalition Provisional Authority and, later, as director of the Iraq Reconstruction Management Office under the U.S. Department of State. Under his direction, these organizations managed the $18.4 billion Iraq infrastructure reconstruction program. His service in the U.S. Navy spanned 33 years, during which he served as an officer in the Civil Engineer Corps (CEC). Among his many leadership positions, he served at the top of the CEC as commander, Naval Facilities Engineering Command, and chief of civil engineers.


E. Sarah Slaughter, Vice Chair, is a National Academies’ associate who currently conducts a laboratory on sustainable development at the Sloan School of Business at the Massachusetts Institute



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A Biosketches of C ommittee Members David J. Nash, Chair, has more than four decades of experience in building, design, and program management for both the U.S. Navy and the private sector. His experience includes the manage- ment of multibillion-dollar physical asset programs, including the U.S. Navy’s shore installations worldwide and the reconstruc- tion of Iraq’s infrastructure. He is the president of Dave Nash and Associates, LLC, a company focused on project development and execution in emerging markets and in the United States. He was previously the president of government operations for the international engineering firm of BE&K, Inc., headquartered in Birmingham, Alabama. Prior to joining BE&K, Admiral Nash served as director of the Iraq Program Management Office under the Coalition Provi- sional Authority and, later, as director of the Iraq Reconstruction Management Office under the U.S. Department of State. Under his direction, these organizations managed the $18.4 billion Iraq infrastructure reconstruction program. His service in the U.S. Navy spanned 33 years, during which he served as an officer in the Civil Engineer Corps (CEC). Among his many leadership positions, he served at the top of the CEC as commander, Naval Facilities Engineering Command, and chief of civil engineers. E. Sarah Slaughter, Vice Chair, is a National Academies’ associate who currently conducts a laboratory on sustainable development at the Sloan School of Business at the Massachusetts Institute 

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of Technology (MIT). Dr. Slaughter previously served as the founder and president of MOCA Systems, Inc., a provider of simulation systems for managing capital projects. Before found- ing MOCA in 1999, she was a professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at MIT specializing in construc- tion management. Prior to joining MIT, she was a professor of civil and environmental engineering at Lehigh University and a researcher at the Center for Advanced Technology for Large Structural Systems. She has researched innovations in design and construction for more than 20 years, and has published more than 50 articles and books on this topic. Dr. Slaughter is a recognized leader in her field and has been selected for several prominent committees and awards. She received all of her degrees from MIT, including a BS in civil engineering, an MS in civil engineering and technology and policy, and a PhD in civil engineering and management science. Massoud Amin is a professor of electrical and computer engineering, holds the Honeywell/H.W. Sweatt Chair in Tech- nological Leadership, and is the director of the Center for the Development of Technological Leadership at the University of Minnesota. In addition to his administrative responsibilities, he serves as the director of graduate studies for the Management of Technology Program and teaches several courses. Prior to joining the University of Minnesota in March 2003, Dr. Amin was with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in Palo Alto, California. In the aftermath of the tragic events of September 11, 2001, he directed all security-related research and development at EPRI, including the Infrastructure Security Initia- tive and the Enterprise Information Security. Before October 2001, he served as manager of mathematics and information science at EPRI, where he led strategic research in modeling, simulation, optimization, and adaptive control of national infrastructures for energy, telecommunication, transportation, and finance. He served as a member of the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment from 2001 to 2007 and is currently a member of the Board on Math- ematical Sciences and Applications. Dr. Amin also serves on the NRC Committee on Enhancing the Robustness and Resilience of Future Electrical Transmission and Distribution in the United States to Terrorist Attack. 0 SUSTAINABLE CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE SYSTEMS

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Mark Eberhart is a professor of chemistry and materials science with the Colorado School of Mines, where he is actively involved in communicating the concepts of science and engineering to the public. He has published two books of popular science: Why Things Break: Understanding the World by the Way It Comes Apart (Harmony Books, 2003) and Feeding the Fire: The Lost History and Uncertain Future of Mankind’s Energy Addiction (Harmony Books, 2007). Dr. Eberhart earned his PhD in materials science and engineering from MIT in 1983. He is currently a consultant to the Public Broadcasting Service’s program NOVA in its development of a series on materials science. He was the American Chemical Society’s Diplomacy Fellow in 2004-2005. Henry J. Hatch retired from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, where he served as chief of engineers and as commander. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1992. His interests include all aspects of civil engineering; public policy related to infrastructure, the environment, and sustain- able development; military engineering; leadership; engineering management; and water resources development. General Hatch was the chair of the Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment from 2005 to 2007. General Hatch was the chief operating officer of the Ameri- can Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) from 1997 to 1999. Before joining ASCE, he was president and chief executive officer of Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc., where he directed a $5 billion, 5-year management contract for the U.S. Department of Energy’s envi- ronmental cleanup at the Hanford Nuclear Site. General Hatch is a registered professional engineer in the District of Columbia and a member and past national president of the Society of American Military Engineers. He graduated from the U.S. Military Acad- emy at West Point and has an MS in geodetic science from Ohio State University. Sue McNeil is a professor of civil and environmental engineering and urban affairs and public policy at the University of Delaware. She was formerly director of the Urban Transportation Center and professor in the College of Urban Planning and Public Affairs and the Department of Civil and Materials Engineering at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). Prior to joining UIC, she was a professor of civil and environmental engineering and of engineering and public policy at Carnegie Mellon University.  APPENDIX A

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She is an expert in transportation infrastructure management with emphasis on the application of advanced technologies, economic analysis, analytical methods, and computer applica- tions. Dr. McNeil is a member of the executive committee of the Transportation Research Board (TRB) and served on the Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment from 2001 to 2007. She chairs the TRB Committee on Asset Management. She chaired the ASCE Urban Transportation Division Commit- tee on Transportation Facilities Management (1988-1993) and is a founding associate editor of the ASCE Journal of Infrastructure Systems. Dr. McNeil is a registered professional engineer. Robert Prieto is senior vice president of the Fluor Corporation’s Industrial and Infrastructure Group. Fluor Corporation provides services on a global basis in the fields of engineering, procure- ment, construction, operations, maintenance, and project man- agement. Mr. Prieto has extensive experience in developing world-class projects for the global infrastructure industry and has participated internationally on task forces and forums focused on delivering critical infrastructure to meet the growing needs of cities and of homeland security. He is the author of Strategic Program Management, which addresses some of the major strate- gic issues that affect all large construction programs and projects, including changes in program governance structures. Previously Mr. Prieto served as one of three presidential appointees to the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation Business Advisory Council, as well as serving on the boards of several international, industrial, and educational organizations. He co-chaired the New York City Partnership’s Infrastructure Task Force, established following September 11, 2001, and chaired the historic meeting of the World Economic Forum’s Engineering and Construction Governors held in New York City in Febru- ary 2002. Under his leadership, the Disaster Response Network of the World Economic Forum was initiated. Mr. Prieto holds a bachelor’s degree from New York University and a master’s degree from the Polytechnic Institute of New York, where he currently serves as a trustee. Garret P. Westerhoff is chairman emeritus of Malcolm Pirnie, Inc., and a leading national expert on water treatment systems, water resources planning, and the design of drinking water projects. A pioneer of innovative technologies, he led design of  SUSTAINABLE CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE SYSTEMS

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the nation’s first major installation of granular-activated carbon treatment to remove a broad spectrum of organic contaminants from drinking water. Mr. Westerhoff was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2000 for leadership in the application of new technologies for drinking water treatment and for inter- national contributions to utility management. He is a member of the NRC’s Water Science and Technology Board. A licensed professional engineer in 14 states and a profes- sional planner in New Jersey, Mr. Westerhoff holds BS and MS degrees in engineering from the New Jersey Institute of Technol- ogy, is an honorary member of the American Water Works Asso- ciation, and is actively involved in leadership roles in numerous professional societies. He is a prolific author with numerous pub- lished articles, and he has authored two major texts for drinking water utilities, The Changing Water Utility: Creative Approaches to Effectiveness and Efficiency (1998) and The Evolving Water Utility: Pathways to Higher Performance (2003), both published by the American Water Works Association.  APPENDIX A

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