B
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

David H. Wegman (Chair), is a professor in the School of Health and Environment at the University of Massachusetts–Lowell. He rejoined the faculty in fall 2008 after serving a 5-year term as dean of the School of Health and Environment. Previously he served as chair of the Department of Work Environment, a position he held since its founding in 1987, and he remains an adjunct professor at the Harvard School of Public Health. Prior to 1987 he served as director of the Division of Occupational and Environmental Health at the University of California–Los Angeles (UCLA) School of Public Health and on the faculty at Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Wegman has focused his research on epidemiologic studies of occupational respiratory disease, musculoskeletal disorders, and cancer. He has published more than 200 articles in the scientific literature. He has also written on public health and policy issues concerning hazard and health surveillance; methods of exposure assessment for epidemiologic studies; development of alternatives to regulation; and use of participatory methods to study occupational health risks. He is coeditor of Occupational and Environmental Health: Recognizing and Preventing Disease and Injury, the fifth edition of which was published by Lippincott, Williams, and Wilkins in 2006. His recent work has focused on the examination of health and safety risks among heavy- and highway-construction workers; the study of the relationship of work risks and age among child laborers and older adults; and public health surveillance methods and systems for occupational disease. He has served as chair of the National Research Council (NRC) and Institute of Medicine (IOM) Committees on Health and Safety Needs of Older Workers and the Health and



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B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members David H. Wegman (Chair), is a professor in the School of Health and Environment at the University of Massachusetts–Lowell. He rejoined the faculty in fall 2008 after serving a 5-year term as dean of the School of Health and Environment. Previously he served as chair of the Department of Work Environment, a position he held since its founding in 1987, and he remains an adjunct professor at the Harvard School of Public Health. Prior to 1987 he served as director of the Division of Occupational and Environmental Health at the University of California–Los Angeles (UCLA) School of Public Health and on the faculty at Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Wegman has focused his research on epidemiologic studies of occupational respiratory disease, musculoskeletal disorders, and cancer. He has published more than 200 articles in the scientific literature. He has also written on public health and policy issues concerning hazard and health surveillance; methods of exposure assessment for epidemiologic studies; development of alternatives to regulation; and use of participatory methods to study occupational health risks. He is coedi- tor of Occupational and Environmental Health: Recognizing and Preventing Disease and Injury, the fifth edition of which was published by Lippincott, Williams, and Wilkins in 2006. His recent work has focused on the examination of health and safety risks among heavy- and highway-construction workers; the study of the re- lationship of work risks and age among child laborers and older adults; and public health surveillance methods and systems for occupational disease. He has served as chair of the National Research Council (NRC) and Institute of Medicine (IOM) Committees on Health and Safety Needs of Older Workers and the Health and 0

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0 e va l u at i n g o c c u Pat i o n a l H e a lt H a n d s a f e t y R e s e a R c H P R o g R a m s Safety Consequences of Child Labor. He has also been a member of the NRC–IOM Panel on Musculoskeletal Disorders and Work, and the IOM committees to Review the Health Consequences of Service During the Persian Gulf War and to Review Gender Differences in Susceptibility to Environmental Factors. Currently he serves as chair of the NRC–IOM Committee on Review of National Institute for Occupa- tional Safety and Health (NIOSH) Research Programs. He received his B.A. from Swarthmore College and his M.D. and M.Sc. from Harvard University and is board certified in preventive medicine (occupational medicine). William B. Bunn III, is vice president of health, safety, security, and productivity at International Truck and Engine Corporation (formerly Navistar International) in Warrenville, IL. Previously, he was medical director and director of health care, workers’ compensation, disability, and safety for Navistar International, and prior to that was director of International Medical Services for Mobil Corpora- tion. Dr. Bunn has an appointment as professor of clinical preventive medicine at Northwestern University School of Medicine. He received the Occupational and Environmental Education Foundation Award in 2003, the William S. Knudsen Award in 2002, and the Institute for Health and Productivity Management Cor- porate Health and Productivity Award in 2001. He chaired the NRC Committee on Department of Energy Radiation Epidemiological Research Programs, and has served on numerous advisory committees, including the Science Advisory Board of the Environmental Protection Agency, Board of Scientific Counselors of NIOSH, and Committee on Clinical Services. He is also a fellow board member and former officer of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine. He received a J.D. and M.D. from Duke University and an M.P.H. from the University of North Carolina. Carlos A. Camargo, Jr., is an associate professor of medicine and epidemiology at Harvard Medical School, an emergency physician at Massachusetts General Hospital and a research epidemiologist at the Channing Laboratory, Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, MA. His research focuses on asthma and other respiratory/allergy problems in several large national cohorts (e.g., the Nurses’ Health Studies). He also chairs the Steering Committee of the Emergency Medicine Network (EMNet), a research collaboration involving 204 emergency departments. This network has completed numerous multicenter studies and randomized trials focusing on respiratory/allergy emergencies and public health issues. Dr. Camargo is past president of the American College of Epidemiology and served on the 2005 U.S. Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee and the National Institutes of Health’s National Asthma Education and Prevention Program’s Third Expert Panel (the group writing the national asthma guidelines). He has authored more than 350

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aPPendix b  peer-reviewed publications. Dr. Camargo received his M.D. from the University of California–San Francisco; his M.P.H. from the University of California–Berkeley; and his Dr.P.H. from the Harvard School of Public Health. Susan E. Cozzens is a professor of public policy at the Georgia Institute of Technol- ogy, director of its Technology Policy and Assessment Center, and associate dean for research at its Ivan Allen College. She is currently working on research in the fields of science, technology, and inequalities; she continues to work internationally on developing methods for research assessment, as well as science and technology indicators. Prior to joining the faculty at Georgia Tech, she was the director of the Office of Policy Support at the National Science Foundation (NSF). Dr. Cozzens has served as a consultant to numerous organizations, including the Office of Science and Technology Policy, NSF, Office of Technology Assessment, General Account- ability Office, National Cancer Institute, National Institute on Aging, and other NIH institutes. She has served on several NRC and IOM committees, including Evaluation of the Sea Grant Program Review Process, Assessment of Centers of Excellence Programs at NIH, Research Standards and Practices to Prevent the De- structive Application of Biotechnology, and the Committee to Review the NIOSH Hearing Loss Research Program. Dr. Cozzens is the past editor of Science, Technol- ogy, & Human Values and the Journal of the Society for Social Studies of Science. She currently is the co-editor of Research Evaluation. She earned her Ph.D. in sociology from Columbia University. Letitia K. Davis is director of the Occupational Health Surveillance Program in the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, where she has worked for more than 20 years to develop state-based surveillance systems for work-related illnesses and inju- ries. She has overseen the formation of a physician reporting system for occupational disease, the Massachusetts Occupational Lead Registry, a comprehensive surveillance system for fatal occupational injuries, the Massachusetts Sharps Injury Surveillance System, and a model surveillance system for work-related injuries to children and adolescents younger than 18. She has conducted numerous surveillance research studies exploring use of existing public health data sources to document work- related injuries and illnesses. She is currently engaged in a project using community health center data to document occupational health needs of underserved worker populations. She is also responsible for the development of prevention programs to address identified occupational health problems and advises the department leader- ship on matters of occupational health policy. Dr. Davis serves as adjunct faculty of the Department of Work Environment at the University of Massachusetts–Lowell and as a visiting lecturer on Occupational Health at the Harvard School of Public Health. She is also a lead consultant in occupational health to the Council of State

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 e va l u at i n g o c c u Pat i o n a l H e a lt H a n d s a f e t y R e s e a R c H P R o g R a m s and Territorial Epidemiologists and has played a leadership role nationally in the ef- fort integrate occupational health into public health practice at the state level. She is a past member of the Board of Scientific Counselors of NIOSH and of the National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health. Dr. Davis received her doctorate in occupational health from the Harvard School of Public Health. James W. Dearing is senior scientist at the Institute for Health Research with Kaiser Permanente Colorado, where he directs the Cancer Communication Research Center and codirects the Center for Health Dissemination and Implementation Research (with Russell Glasgow). Until 2006, he was professor and director of graduate studies for the School of Communication Studies at Ohio University and has been a faculty member at Michigan State University, a visiting faculty member at the University of Michigan, and a visiting scholar at the University of California– Berkeley. Dr. Dearing studied under and collaborated with Everett M. Rogers for 20 years. Dr. Dearing’s primary area of expertise is the application of diffusion of innovation concepts to challenges of moving evidence-based practices, programs, and policies into practice. He has led research projects about community-based health system reform, mass media agenda setting, community health promotion planning, interorganizational networks, and organizational change. Dr. Dearing has most recently conducted studies sponsored by the NSF; John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation; The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation; National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; and the National Cancer Institute. His most recent book, Communication of Innovations, was co-edited with Arvind Singhal. He holds a Ph.D. in communication theory and research from the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Southern California. Fred A. Mettler, Jr., is a professor emeritus in the Department of Radiology at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine. He was chair of the department for 18 years, from 1984 to 2003. He is currently chief of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine at the New Mexico Federal Regional Medical Center. He is an academician of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences and a Fellow of both the American College of Radiology and the American College of Nuclear Physicians. Dr. Mettler has authored more than 310 scientific publications, including 18 books on medi- cal management of radiation accidents, medical effects of ionizing radiation, and radiology and nuclear medicine. He holds four patents. He was a scientific vice president of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, and remains a member. He has chaired two committees for the IOM and NRC. He is currently the U.S. Representative to the United Nations for Radiation Effects and is an emeritus commissioner of the International Commission on Radiation Protection. He was the health effects team leader of the International Chernobyl

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aPPendix b  Project. He graduated with a B.A. in mathematics from Columbia University and an M.D. from Thomas Jefferson University. He received an M.P.H. from Harvard University. Franklin E. Mirer is professor of Environmental and Occupational Health at Hunter College of the City University of New York. Previously, he served for de- cades as director of the Health and Safety Department for the United Automobile, Aerospace and Agricultural Implement Workers of America. His primary scientific interest is exposure and risk assessment in the occupational environment, and the interaction of science and policy in setting and enforcing health regulations. Dr. Mirer has served on National Academies committees on Institutional Means for Risk Assessment, Risk Assessment Methodology, and the Review of the Health Effects Institute. He has testified before House and Senate committees on occupa- tional safety and health matters. He was inducted into the National Safety Council’s Health and Safety Hall of Fame and is a Fellow of the Collegium Ramazzini and the American Industrial Hygiene Association. He holds appointments as an adjunct professor at the Michigan School of Public Health, adjunct associate professor at the Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, and visiting lecturer at the Harvard School of Public Health. He holds a Ph.D. in physical organic chemistry from Harvard University and is a toxicologist and certified industrial hygienist. Jacqueline Nowell is director of the Occupational Safety and Health Office at the United Food and Commercial Workers International Union. Ms. Nowell and her staff develop and monitor ergonomic programs in the red meat, poultry, and retail industries. They develop educational materials and conduct training programs for local union stewards and leadership on a variety of safety and health issues in the union’s represented industries. She is a member of the American Public Health Association and American Industrial Hygiene Association, and she serves on the NIOSH/National Occupational Research Agenda Traumatic Injuries and Special Populations at Risk Teams. She is currently a board member on the District of Co- lumbia Occupational Safety and Health Board, which establishes policies related to occupational safety and health issues in the District of Columbia. She has worked for the New York Committee for Occupational Safety and Health and was an as- sistant professor at Hunter College’s School of Health Sciences and Environmental and Occupational Health Science Program. Ms. Nowell received her M.P.H. from UCLA and is a certified industrial hygienist. Raja V. Ramani is emeritus George H., Jr., and Anne B. Deike Chair of Mining Engineering and professor emeritus of mining and geoenvironmental engineering at Pennsylvania State University. His research activities include mine health, safety,

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 e va l u at i n g o c c u Pat i o n a l H e a lt H a n d s a f e t y R e s e a R c H P R o g R a m s productivity, environment, and management; flow mechanisms of air, gas, and dust in mining environs; and innovative mining methods. Dr. Ramani has been a con- sultant to the United Nations, The World Bank, and the National Safety Council. He was the 1995 president of the Society for Mining, Metallurgy, and Exploration. He served on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Mine Health Research Advisory Committee. He was chair of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Committee on Post Disaster Survival and Rescue and a member of the Health Research Panel of the NAS Committee on the Research Programs of the U.S. Bureau of Mines. He was a member of the Department of the Interior’s Advisory Board to the Director of the U.S. Bureau of Mines and a member of the Secretary of Labor’s Advisory Committee on the Elimination of Coal Worker’s Pneumoco- niosis. More recently, he was a member of the NAS committees on Technologies for the Mining Industries and on Coal Waste Impoundments. He also chaired the NRC–IOM Committee to Review the NIOSH Mining Safety and Health Research Program. Dr. Ramani is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Dr. Ramani holds an M.S. and a Ph.D. in mining engineering from Penn State, where he has been on the faculty since 1970. Jorma Rantanen is the director emeritus of the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health. Dr. Rantanen has served as president of the International Commission on Occupational Health. He has led efforts to anticipate emerging workplace hazards, built an international network of occupational safety and health professionals, and improved working conditions in developing nations. He has been a pioneer in the development and recognition of comprehensive occupational health, including development of healthy and safe work environments, promotion and maintenance of work ability, and introduction of healthy work practices and lifestyles. He was awarded the NIOSH Lifetime Achievement Award in Occupational Safety and Health. He is the author of more than 430 research reports and book chapters covering medical biochemistry, radiation biology, toxicology, and risk assessment. Dr. Rantanen holds a Ph.D. in radiation biology and medical biochemistry from the University of Turku. Richard L. Tucker is vice president of Tucker and Tucker Consultants, Inc., a pri- vate consulting organization related to management of large projects. Dr. Tucker’s career has included three overlapping, but complementary, aspects. He has been a professor and researcher at two universities and, in retirement, holds the Joe C. Walter, Jr., Chair Emeritus at the University of Texas–Austin. He has been an academic administrator and director of a major research center involving several hundred construction industry executives. He has also had considerable direct industry involvement as an employee, an executive, and a consultant with several

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aPPendix b  of the world’s largest companies and projects. He has been personally involved in developing improved construction productivity methods, industry benchmarking, and metrics. Dr. Tucker has published more than 100 reports and journal articles. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of Construction. Dr. Tucker has a Ph.D. in civil engineering from the University of Texas. James J. Zuiches is vice chancellor for extension, engagement, and economic de- velopment at North Carolina State University. He served previously as professor and extension specialist in the Department of Community and Rural Sociology at Washington State University (WSU). Dr. Zuiches has also served as dean of the WSU College of Agricultural, Human, and Natural Resource Sciences; director of the Agricultural Research Center; director of Cooperative Extension; and vice chair and member of the Washington State Board of Natural Resources. His research specializations include demography, community and rural sociology, and research administration. He has also written on research priorities, indirect costs, distance education, and the returns on investment in research. Dr. Zuiches has received the Sustained Superior Performance Award from the NSF and is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He served on the NRC Committee on the Future of Colleges of Agriculture in the Land-Grant University System, and on the NRC Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources. He has a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

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