FIGURE 2-2 Schematic representation of airflow through the six filter banks that make up each MDB HVAC filter unit. Carbon filters each contain 48 filter trays arrayed in six columns and eight rows, with each tray oriented in horizontal position. The 85 indicates 85 percent efficiency for the particulate prefilter; H indicates HEPA filter; F indicates filter; and C indicates carbon filter. SOURCE: Robie Jackson, Waste Management Manager, ANCDF, and Tracy Smith, Trial Burn Manager, ANCDF, “The use of carbon at ANCDF,” Presentation to the committee, June 5, 2008.

FIGURE 2-2 Schematic representation of airflow through the six filter banks that make up each MDB HVAC filter unit. Carbon filters each contain 48 filter trays arrayed in six columns and eight rows, with each tray oriented in horizontal position. The 85 indicates 85 percent efficiency for the particulate prefilter; H indicates HEPA filter; F indicates filter; and C indicates carbon filter. SOURCE: Robie Jackson, Waste Management Manager, ANCDF, and Tracy Smith, Trial Burn Manager, ANCDF, “The use of carbon at ANCDF,” Presentation to the committee, June 5, 2008.

Chemical Agent Disposal Facility (NECDF), which recently completed destruction of the stockpile of bulk VX nerve agent stored in ton containers at the site. Table 2-2 also indicates the quantities of carbon that the Army currently anticipates for off-site and on-site treatment.

Table 2-3 estimates the quantities of carbon anticipated to be exposed to agent and the operations that produce them at each of the Chemical Materials Agency (CMA) incineration facilities. Table 2-4 pro

FIGURE 2-3 A filter tray. SOURCE: Robie Jackson, Waste Management Manager, ANCDF, and Tracy Smith, Trial Burn Manager, ANDCF, “The use of carbon at ANCDF,” Presentation to the committee, June 5, 2008.

FIGURE 2-3 A filter tray. SOURCE: Robie Jackson, Waste Management Manager, ANCDF, and Tracy Smith, Trial Burn Manager, ANDCF, “The use of carbon at ANCDF,” Presentation to the committee, June 5, 2008.

vides complementary estimates of the quantities of carbon that can be considered unexposed to agent and the operations where this carbon was used. These estimates include used carbon from both operations and closure and are based on data provided by the Army showing which carbon it expects will be treated on-site in the MPF (exposed) and which can be slated for off-site shipment (unexposed.)

It is important to note that the numbers in Tables 2-3 and 2-4 represent calculated estimates as of September 2008 and are subject to changes based on operational factors, design modifications, and ongoing developments and negotiations concerning permitting and regulatory requirements for on-site analysis and treatment and off-site shipment and disposal. There is also some variation in how the data from which these tables were generated was compiled at each site (e.g., dry weight or actual weight, frame and hardware weight included or not). However, the main point made by Tables 2-3 and 2-4 is that the anticipated total amount of exposed carbon (~508,400 lb) is about one-fourth the anticipated total amount of unexposed carbon (~2,107,800 lb), or only about one-fifth the total used carbon (~2,616,200 lb) expected from operations and closure at the four incineration sites.

Also evident from Table 2-3: The overwhelming majority of exposed carbon comes from the MDB HVAC system, which is also the source of about half the unexposed carbon, as shown in Table 2-4. The PFS



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement