Appendix B
Biographical Information: Committee on New Orleans Regional Hurricane Protection Projects
Committee on New Orleans Regional Hurricane Protection Projects

G. Wayne Clough (NAE), Chair, is secretary of the Smithsonian Institution. Prior to joining Smithsonian in 2008, Dr. Clough was the president of the Georgia Institute of Technology. His technical interests lie primarily in geotechnical engineering, earthquake engineering, and heavy construction, particularly underground construction. Dr. Clough’s research has centered on laboratory and field testing, earthquake analysis, soil behavior, and the application of numerical methods to soil-structure interaction. He has been especially interested in developing new methods that allow design of soil-structure systems using movement control concepts. With his increasing involvement in academic administration, he has taken a greater interest in higher education and technology policy. Dr. Clough’s recent writings have been on the future of the research and development enterprise, and the role of technology in society. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in civil engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology and his Ph.D. degree in geotechnical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley.


Rafael L. Bras (NAE) is the Dean of the Henry Samueli School of Engineering at the University of California, Irvine, and Distinguished Professor in its Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. Dr. Bras’ research interests are in the prediction of hydrologic extremes (flood and droughts), the use of forecasts to improve responses to those disasters, and improved water resources management. He is also interested in quantifying the effects of large-scale changes in land surfaces (agriculture, deforestation) on the global hydrologic cycle and energy cycles. Dr. Bras also has conducted studies in landscape evolution and fluvial geomorphology. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in civil engineering and his Sc.D. degree in water resources and hydrology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.



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Appendix B Biographical Information: Committee on New Orleans Regional Hurricane Protection Projects Committee on New Orleans Regional Hurricane Protection Projects G. Wayne Clough (NAE), Chair, is secretary of the Smithsonian Institution. Prior to joining Smithsonian in 2008, Dr. Clough was the president of the Georgia Institute of Technology. His technical interests lie primarily in geotechnical engineering, earthquake engineering, and heavy construction, particularly underground construction. Dr. Clough’s research has centered on laboratory and field testing, earthquake analysis, soil behavior, and the application of numerical methods to soil-structure interaction. He has been especially interested in developing new methods that allow design of soil-structure systems using movement control concepts. With his increasing involvement in academic administration, he has taken a greater interest in higher education and technology policy. Dr. Clough’s recent writings have been on the future of the research and development enterprise, and the role of technology in society. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in civil engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology and his Ph.D. degree in geotechnical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. Rafael L. Bras (NAE) is the Dean of the Henry Samueli School of Engineering at the University of California, Irvine, and Distinguished Professor in its Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. Dr. Bras’ research interests are in the prediction of hydrologic extremes (flood and droughts), the use of forecasts to improve responses to those disasters, and improved water resources management. He is also interested in quantifying the effects of large-scale changes in land surfaces (agriculture, deforestation) on the global hydrologic cycle and energy cycles. Dr. Bras also has conducted studies in landscape evolution and fluvial geomorphology. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in civil engineering and his Sc.D. degree in water resources and hydrology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 41

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42 The New Orleans Hurricane Protection System John T. Christian (NAE) is a consulting engineer in Waban, Massachusetts. His primary area of interest is geotechnical engineering. Much of his early work involved developing and applying numerical methods such as the finite element method. He has also worked on reliability methods for geotechnical applications, soil dynamics, and earthquake engineering on a broad range of civil engineering projects. Dr. Christian’s current interests are largely focused on the use of reliability techniques in geotechnical engineering and on earthquake engineering. Much of his work in industry was associated with power generating facilities, including but not limited to nuclear power plants. Dr. Christian is also interested in the evolving procedures and standards for undergraduate education, especially as reflected in the accreditation process. He received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in civil engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Jos Dijkman is a flood management engineer with Deltares/Delft Hydraulics in Delft, The Netherlands. Mr. Dijkman has over 30 years of experience in water resources and flood management projects, both in the Netherlands and internationally. He has lived and worked for many years in Southeast Asia, where he focused on regional water management issues. He was also involved in many water management and flood mitigation projects internationally, including the United States (upper Mississippi River basin). He had played a leading role in several feasibility and public policy studies in the Netherlands related to mitigating current and expected future flooding risks. Among these was the “Room for the River” study, which set a new course for national flood risk management policy in the Netherlands. He also serves as a member of the independent Dutch National Advisory Committee on Flood Management Issues. Mr. Dijkman received his M.Sc. degree in civil engineering from the University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands. Robin L. Dillon-Merrill is an associate professor at Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business. Her areas of specialty include decision and risk analysis, with applications in the fields of space missions, information systems, and worker safety issues. Prior to her appointment at Georgetown, Dr. Dillon served on the faculty at Virginia Tech’s Pamplin College of Business, and with Fluor Daniel, Inc., where she analyzed technologies and sites for tritium supply and recycling using decision analysis and a simulation of production assurance. She received her B.S. and M.S. degrees in systems engineering with risk analysis concentration from the University of Virginia, and her Ph.D. degree in engineering risk analysis from Stanford University. Delon Hampton (NAE) is the chairman of the board at Delon Hampton and Associates in Washington, DC. His major interest is in the area of tunneling and underground design and construction. Dr. Hampton has been involved

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Appendix B 43 in the design and/or construction of tunnels in both hard and soft ground, as well as shafts and connecting and intercepting structures. He has also been involved in restoration and rehabilitation of a failed submerged tunnel system, and in tunneling research. He has also worked on design of highway and airfield pavements. This includes establishing design parameters for subgrades and base courses, as well as required pavement thicknesses for Portland cement concrete and asphaltic concrete surface courses. Dr. Hampton received his B.S. degree in civil engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in civil engineering from Purdue University. Greg J. Holland is the director of the Mesoscale and Microscale Meteorology (MMM) Division of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colorado. Dr. Holland spent much his career with Australia’s Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre. Previously he was with Aerosonde, a manufacturer of lightweight and long-range robotic aircraft. After beginning his career as a mathematician, he focused primarily on tropical meteorology and severe weather at the Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre. In 2005, he joined the staff at NCAR, where he directs the MMM unit. He also helped set up field facilities, and he established programs studying the coastal impacts of tropical cyclones. He received his B.S. degree from the University of New South Wales in mathematics and physics and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in atmospheric science from Colorado State University. Richard A. Luettich, Jr. is the director of the Institute of Marine Sciences at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research has dealt broadly with modeling and measurement of circulation and transport in coastal waters. Dr. Luettich’s modeling efforts have emphasized the development and application of unstructured grid solution techniques that are optimized for geometrically complex systems such as sounds, estuaries, inlets and inundated regions. He has co-developed a circulation and storm surge model that has been applied extensively for modeling storm surge in the southern Louisiana and New Orleans areas. Dr. Luettich also has participated in the development of components of the national Coastal Ocean Observing System. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in civil engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology and his Sc.D. in civil engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Peter Marshall is a consulting engineer. Previously he was vice-president of operations at Burns & Roe Services Corporation after a career in the Civil Engineer Corps of the U.S. Navy. Prior to joining Burns and Roe, he served as a senior vice-president with Parsons Brinckerhoff Construction Services Corporation, where he was responsible for project development and project operations. His experience in the Navy Civil Engineer Corps included positions with the Naval Facilities Engineering Command. His positions there included

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44 The New Orleans Hurricane Protection System commanding officer of the Navy Public Works Center in San Francisco, fleet civil engineer of Naval Forces Europe, commander of the 22nd Naval Construction Regiment and Pacific Division of NAVFAC, and vice-commander of NAVFAC. Mr. Marshall is a fellow of the Society of American Military Engineers and a licensed professional engineer in Virginia and California. He received his B.S. degree in civil engineering from Tufts University and his M.S. degree in ocean engineering from the University of Rhode Island. David H. Moreau is a professor in the Departments of City and Regional Planning and Environmental Sciences and Engineering at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Dr. Moreau teaches water resources planning and regional environmental planning. His research interests include analysis, planning, financing, and evaluation of water resource and related environmental programs. He is engaged in water resources planning at the local, state, and national levels. He has chaired or served on several NRC committees, most recently as a member of the NRC committee that issued the report, “Nutrient Control Actions for Improving Water Quality in the Mississippi River Basin and the Northern Gulf of Mexico.” Dr. Moreau serves as chairman of the North Carolina Environmental Management Commission, the state’s regulatory commission for water quality, air quality, and water allocation. Dr. Moreau received his B.S. degree from Mississippi State University, his M.S. degree from North Carolina State University, and his Ph.D. degree from Harvard University. Thomas D. O’Rourke (NAE) is the Thomas R. Briggs professor of engineering at Cornell University. His areas of study and research include: 1) large ground deformation during earthquakes, with emphasis on mechanisms and characteristics of soil liquefaction and its influence on critical lifeline systems, 2) seismic performance of water supply and gas and liquid fuel distribution systems, with emphasis on earthquake protection of water supply and energy distribution systems, methods for earthquake loss estimation, and interactive modeling of utility systems, 3) deep excavation and underground construction technology, with emphasis on predicting ground movements caused by deep excavations and tunneling, improved methods for assessing stability of deep excavations, and the use of deep soil mixing and jet grouting technologies, 4) pipeline design, rehabilitation, and systems performance, and 5) performance and interaction of polymeric materials with soil and groundwater. Dr. O’Rourke received his B.S. degree in civil engineering from Cornell University in 1970 and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in civil engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Kenneth W. Potter is a professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Wisconsin. Dr. Potter’s areas of research

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Appendix B 45 interests include hydrological modeling and design, estimation of hydrologic risk, estimation of hydrological budgets, and restoration of aquatic systems. He has been a fellow of the AAAS, a fellow of the AGU, and a Woodrow Wilson fellow. Dr. Potter received his B.S. degree in geology from Louisiana State University and his Ph.D. in geography and environmental engineering from Johns Hopkins University. Y. Peter Sheng is a professor with the Civil and Coastal Engineering Department at the University of Florida, Gainesville. His fields of interest include coastal and estuarine circulation modeling and monitoring; turbulent transport and modeling; sediment transport and water quality dynamics and modeling; light attenuation processes; seagrass dynamics and modeling; atmospheric boundary layer dynamics; tornado dynamics; dispersion and deposition processes and modeling; storm surge and coastal flooding modeling and monitoring; and, integrated modeling for ecosystem restoration and coastal hazard mitigation. Dr. Sheng received his B.S. degree in mechanical engineering from the National Taiwan University, and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in engineering, fluid and thermal sciences, from Case Western Reserve University. Robert H. Weisberg is a Distinguished University Professor and a professor of physical oceanography in the College of Marine Science at the University of South Florida. Dr. Weisberg is an experimental physical oceanographer engaged in ocean circulation and ocean-atmosphere interaction studies in the tropics, on continental shelves, and in estuaries. He is the director of the USF Ocean Circulation Group and co-director of the USF Coastal Ocean Modeling and Prediction System and Center for Prediction of Red Tide. His research presently emphasizes in-situ measurements, analyses, and models of the West Florida shelf circulation and interactions between the shelf and the estuaries and between the shelf and the deep ocean. Dr. Weisberg received his B.S. degree in materials science and engineering from Cornell University and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in physical oceanography from the University of Rhode Island. Andrew J. Whittle is a professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His area of expertise is in geotechnical engineering, constitutive models for geomaterials, analysis methods for foundations, excavations and tunnels, in situ test methods, and ground improvement. Dr. Whittle’s teaching interests include introduction and advanced geotechnical engineering and theoretical soil mechanics. He received his B.Sc. degree from Imperial College of Science and Technology and his Sc.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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46 The New Orleans Hurricane Protection System NRC Staff Jeffrey Jacobs is a scholar with the NRC Water Science and Technology Board. Dr. Jacobs’s research interests include policy and organizational arrangements for water resources management and the use of scientific information in water resources decision making. He has studied these issues extensively both in the United States and in mainland Southeast Asia. Prior to joining the NRC he was a faculty member at the National University of Singapore and at Texas A&M University. Since joining the NRC in 1997, Dr. Jacobs has served as the study director for over twenty NRC reports. He received his B.S. degree in geography from Texas A&M University, his M.A. degree in geography from the University of California, Riverside, and his Ph.D. degree in geography from the University of Colorado.