Year

Event

1990

A congressionally mandated smoking ban takes effect on all domestic airline flights of 6 h or less. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issues a draft risk assessment of secondhand smoke.

1991

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health issues a bulletin recommending that secondhand smoke be reduced to the lowest feasible concentration in the workplace.

1992

Hospitals applying to the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations for accreditation are required to develop a policy prohibiting smoking by patients, visitors, employees, volunteers, and medical staff. EPA releases its report classifying secondhand smoke as a group A carcinogen (known to be harmful to humans), placing secondhand smoke in the same category as asbestos, benzene, and radon.

1993

Los Angeles passes a ban on smoking in all restaurants. The U.S. Postal Service eliminates smoking in all facilities. Congress enacts a smoke-free policy for Special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) clinics. A working group of 16 state attorneys general releases recommendations for establishing smoke-free policies in fast-food restaurants. Vermont bans smoking in all public buildings and in many private buildings open to the public.

1994

The U.S. Department of Defense prohibits smoking in all indoor military facilities. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration proposes a rule that would ban smoking in most U.S. workplaces. San Francisco passes a ban on smoking in all restaurants and workplaces. The Pro-Children Act requires persons who provide federally funded children’s services to prohibit smoking in their facilities. Utah enacts a law restricting smoking in most workplaces.

1995

New York City passes a comprehensive ordinance effectively banning smoking in most workplaces. Maryland enacts a smoke-free policy for all workplaces except hotels, bars, some restaurants, and private clubs. California passes comprehensive legislation that prohibits smoking in most enclosed workplaces. Vermont’s smoking ban is extended to include restaurants, bars, hotels, and motels except establishments holding a cabaret license.

1996

The U.S. Department of Transportation reports that about 80% of nonstop scheduled U.S. airline flights between the United States and foreign points will be smoke-free by June 1, 1996.

1997

President Clinton signs an executive order establishing a smoke-free environment for federal employees and all members of the public visiting federally owned facilities. The California EPA issues a report determining that secondhand smoke is a toxic air contaminant. Settlement is reached in the class-action lawsuit brought by flight attendants exposed to secondhand smoke.

1998

The U.S. Senate ends smoking in the Senate’s public spaces. California law takes effect banning smoking in bars that do not have a separately ventilated smoking area. The Minnesota tobacco-document depository is created as a result of a tobacco-industry settlement with Minnesota and BlueCross BlueShield of Minnesota. U.S. tobacco companies are required to maintain a public depository to house more than 32 million pages of previously secret internal tobacco-industry documents.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement