Year

Event

2000

The New Jersey Supreme Court strikes down a local clean-indoor-air ordinance adopted by the city of Princeton on the grounds that state law preempts local smoking restrictions. A congressionally mandated smoking ban takes effect on all international flights departing from or arriving in the United States.

2002

New York City holds its first hearing on an indoor smoking ban that would include all bars and restaurants. The amended Clean Indoor Air Act enacted by the state of New York (Public Health Law, Article 13-E), which took effect July 24, 2003, prohibits smoking in virtually all workplaces, including restaurants and bars. The Michigan Supreme Court refuses to hear an appeal of lower-court rulings striking down a local clean-indoor-air ordinance enacted by the city of Marquette on the grounds that state law preempts local communities from adopting smoking restrictions in restaurants and bars that are more stringent than the state standard. Delaware enacts a comprehensive smoke-free law and repeals a preemption provision precluding communities from adopting local smoking restrictions that are more stringent than state law. Florida voters approve a ballot measure that amends the state constitution to require most workplaces and public places—with some exceptions, such as bars—to be smoke-free.

2003

Dozens of U.S. airports—including airline clubs, passenger terminals, and nonpublic work areas—are designated as smoke-free. Connecticut and New York enact comprehensive smoke-free laws. Maine enacts a law requiring bars, pool halls, and bingo venues to be smoke-free. State supreme courts in Iowa and New Hampshire strike down local smoke-free ordinances, ruling that they are preempted by state law.

2004

Massachusetts and Rhode Island enact comprehensive smoke-free laws. The International Agency for Research on Cancer issues a new monograph identifying secondhand smoke as “carcinogenic to humans.”

2005

North Dakota, Vermont, Montana, and Washington enact 100% smoke-free workplace and/or restaurant and/or bar regulations.

2006

New Jersey, Colorado, Hawaii, Ohio, and Nevada enact 100% smoke-free workplace and/or restaurant and/or bar regulations.

2007

Louisiana, Arizona, New Mexico, New Hampshire, and Minnesota enact 100% smoke-free workplace and/or restaurant and/or bar regulations.

2008

Illinois, Maryland, Iowa, and Pennsylvania enact 100% smoke-free workplace and/or restaurant and/or bars regulations.

As of Jan. 4, 2009

Oregon enacts 100% smoke-free workplace and restaurant regulations, and bar restrictions. Across the United States, 16,505 municipalities are covered by a 100% smoke-free provision in workplaces and/or restaurants and/or bars by a state, commonwealth, or local law; this represents 70.2% of the U.S. population. The District of Columbia and 37 states have local laws in effect that require 100% smoke-free workplaces and/or restaurants and/or bars.

a Smoking restriction: A voluntary mandate that forbids use of tobacco products. Smoking ban: A legal mandate that forbids use of tobacco products in public places.

SOURCE: ANRF, 2009.



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