TABLE 10.2 Security Features for Security Level 2


Physical

•   Lockable doors, windows, and other passageways

•   Door locks with high-security cores

•   Separate from public areas

•   Hardened doors, frames, and locks

•   Perimeter walls extending from the floor to the ceiling (prevent access from one area to the other over a drop ceiling)

Operational

•   Secure doors, windows, and passageways when not occupied

•   Ensure all laboratory personnel receive security awareness training

•   Escort visitors and contractors, consider an entry log

Electronic

•   Access control system recommended

•   Intrusion alarm recommended where sabotage, theft, or diversion is a concern


and safety impact, and be detrimental to the research programs and the reputation of the institution.

10.H.1.3 High (Security Level 3)

A laboratory characterized as Security Level 3 (see Table 10.3) in this example can pose serious or potentially lethal biological, chemical, or radioactive risks to students, employees, or the environment. Equipment or material loss to theft, malicious pranks, or sabotage would have serious health and safety impacts and consequences to the research programs, the facilities, and the reputation of the institution.

10.H.2 Managing Security

As noted above, any security plan, no matter what level of security is needed, should identify a person or group responsible for the overall plan. The person or group managing the program should have at least basic security knowledge, understand the risks and vulnerabilities, and should be provided sufficient resources, responsibility, and authority.

10.H.3 Training

Security should be an integral part of the laboratory safety program. Ensure all personnel are trained in security issues, in addition to safety issues. Although safety and security are two different things, there are many overlaps between measures used to increase security and those used to increase safety, including

TABLE 10.3 Security Features for Security Level 3


Physical

•   Lockable doors, windows, and other passageways

•   Door locks with high-security cores

•   Separate from public areas

•   Hardened doors, frames, and locks

•   Perimeter walls extending from the floor to the ceiling (prevent access from one area to the other over a drop ceiling)

•   Double-door vestibule entry

Operational

•   Secure doors, windows, and passageways when not occupied

•   Ensure all laboratory personnel receive security awareness training

•   Escort and log in visitors and contractors

•   Lock doors, windows, and passageways at all times

•   Inspect items carried into or removed from the laboratory

•   Have an inventory system is in place for materials of concern.

•   Perform background checks on individuals with direct access to the materials of concern or within the control zone.

Electronic

•   Access control system that records the transaction history of all authorized individuals

•   Biometric personal verification technology recommended

•   Intrusion alarm system

•   Closed-circuit television cameras for entrance and exit points, materials storage, and special equipment


   minimizing the use of hazardous and precursor chemicals, which reduces health, safety, and potential security risks;

   minimizing the supply of hazardous materials on-site;

   restricting access to only those who need to use the material and understand the hazards from both a chemical standpoint and a security standpoint; and

   knowing what to do in an emergency or security breach, and how to recognize threats.

Ensure that all personnel understand the security measures in place and how to use them. No matter how complex a system may be, the weakest link tends to be personnel. For example, even the best access control system may not prevent laboratory personnel from granting an unauthorized individual access to a sensitive area.



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