Appendix A
Workshop Agenda

Frontiers in Soil Science Research

December 12-14, 2005

National Academy of Sciences, Lecture Room

Washington, DC


Monday, December 12

6:00

Workshop introduction by Charles Rice, Kansas State University

Welcome comments from National Academy of Sciences President Ralph J. Cicerone

 

Keynote address: Brent Clothier, Horticultural and Food Research Institute of New Zealand

Sustaining Soil Science: Participation, Policy, Purchase and Progress

7:00

Discussion

7:30-9:00

Reception buffet in the Great Hall

Tuesday, December 13

8:00

Session 1: How well do we understand the interaction of physical, chemical, and biological processes in soils that impact the atmosphere, vegetation, and the hydrogeosphere? Where are the innovations? What gaps need to be addressed?



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Appendix A Workshop Agenda Frontiers in Soil Science Research December 12-14, 2005 National Academy of Sciences, Lecture Room Washington, DC Monday, December  6:00 Workshop introduction by Charles Rice, Kansas State University Welcome comments from National Academy of Sciences President Ralph J. Cicerone Keynote address: Brent Clothier, Horticultural and Food Research Institute of New Zealand Sustaining Soil Science: Participation, Policy, Purchase and Progress 7:00 Discussion 7:30-9:00 Reception buffet in the Great Hall Tuesday, December  Session 1: How well do we understand the interaction of 8:00 physical, chemical, and biological processes in soils that impact the atmosphere, vegetation, and the hydrogeosphere? Where are the innovations? What gaps need to be addressed? 

OCR for page 49
0 APPENDIX A For example, with respect to greenhouse gas fluxes or liquid, gas, and biologic transport. Speaker: Susan Trumbore, University of California, Irvine Transient Tracers on Land: Coordinated Use of Tracers to Quantify Soil Processes within the State Factor Framework Discussants: Janet S. Herman, University of Virginia John M. Norman, University of Wisconsin, Madison Moderator: Jerry Hatfield, USDA-ARS, National Soil Tilth Laboratory 9:30 Break Session 2: What are the chemical interactions at the 10:00 molecular level that define the fate of ions, chemicals, and/or microbes as they are transported through soil systems? How can knowledge gained through molecular investigations be used to constrain studies focused on the chemical interactions and how are these linked to physical and biological processes? Speaker: Scott Fendorf, Stanford University Toward Gaining a Molecular-level Understanding of Processes Governing the Fate and Transport of Ions/Chemicals within Soils Discussants: Gary Pierzynski, Kansas State University Donald Sparks, University of Delaware Moderator: Paul M. Bertsch, University of Georgia 11:30 Lunch Session 3: What controls biodiversity belowground? How can 1:00 knowledge gained through molecular biological investigations (i.e., genomics, proteomics, metabolomics) be used to advance soil science? How do coupled chemical, physical,

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 APPENDIX A and biological processes influence biodiversity? How does this biodiversity affect the function of the soil system? Speaker: James M. Tiedje, Michigan State University Attacking Nature’s Greatest Biological Frontier, the Soil Community Discussants: Cindy H. Nakatsu, Purdue University Kenneth H. Nealson, University of Southern California Moderator: Julie D. Jastrow, Argonne National Laboratory 2:30 Break Session 4: What is the effect of in situ soil architecture on soil 3:00 physical, chemical, and biological processes? How does it vary from one soil system to another? What are the controlling factors? Speaker: Iain M. Young, Scottish Informatics, Mathematics, Biology, and Statistics (SIMBIOS) Centre, University of Abertay Architecture and Biology of Soil Systems Discussants: Brenda J. Buck, University of Nevada Larry P. Wilding, Texas A&M University Moderator: Johan Bouma, Wageningen University, Netherlands 4:30 Breakout Groups. See listing for assignments and locations. 6:00-7:00 Poster display and beer and wine reception

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 APPENDIX A Wednesday, December  8:00 Report on Tuesday’s breakout groups Session 5: How does landscape architecture (topography, 9:00 vegetation, land use) affect the upscaling of soil processes to a regional level? Speaker: César Izaurralde, Joint Global Change Research Institute, University of Maryland How Does Landscape Architecture Affect the Upscaling of Soil Processes to a Regional Level? Discussants: Henry Lin, Pennsylvania State University Susan Moran, USDA-ARS Southwest Watershed Research Center Moderator: Jennifer Harden, U.S. Geological Survey 10:30 Break Session 6: What are the new tools for making in situ 11:00 and laboratory measurements of soil biological and physicochemical properties and processes? How can soil science use technologies and tools already used in other disciplines to advance soil science research? Speakers: Kenneth Kemner, Argonne National Laboratory X-Ray Imaging and Spectroscopy for Making In Situ Measurements of Soil Biological and Physicochemical Properties and Processes Kenneth J. Klabunde, Kansas State University Nanotechnology and Its Possible Applications to Soil Science Moderator: Joaquin Ruiz, University of Arizona 12:30 Lunch (on your own, available in cafeteria downstairs)

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 APPENDIX A Session 7: From a systems analysis standpoint, what are 2:00 the key indicators for detecting the resilience and stability of the soil system? What are critical factors that control the resilience and stability? Our understanding of soils in the United States is based largely on observations, measurements, and maps generated during the past 60 years. How might our current understanding of soils and soil processes be impacted by changes in climate, land use, and water-nutrient-biotic interactions? What types of monitoring might be needed to detect such changes? Speaker: Kate Scow, University of California, Davis Soil and Ecosystems: Stability, Resilience, and Resistance in the Face of Disturbance Discussants: Jayne Belnap, U.S. Geological Survey Canyonlands Research Station, Utah Birl Lowery, University of Wisconsin, Madison Moderator: William A. Jury, University of California, Riverside 3:30 Plenary discussion 6:00 Adjourn