Attachment A
Statement of Task

The National Research Council will appoint a committee to conduct a review of the U.S. Department of Energy’s appliance standards program. The committee’s task is to evaluate or critique the methodology used for setting energy conservation standards for the purpose of determining whether site (point of use) or source (full fuel cycle) energy efficiency measures best serve the goals of energy conservation standards.

The committee may seek to answer questions such as the following:

  • Are available data on appliance and commercial equipment on both point-of-use and/or full fuel-cycle energy use appropriate for the studies undertaken? Are there uncertainties with the data?

  • Are the models and analyses used appropriate for the studies undertaken?

  • Does the measure of energy efficiency and/or energy use (point-of-use or full fuel-cycle) impact the ability of the public to participate in the appliance standards rulemaking process?

  • Does the measure of energy efficiency and/or use affect the studies undertaken by DOE?

The committee will not address whether energy conservation standards are appropriate government policy or what levels may or may not be appropriate. The committee will consider the technical support documents (TSDs) that have been developed for recent rulemakings (distribution transformers and residential furnaces and boilers), the report by Rand, Measures of Residential Energy Consumption and Their Relationships to DOE Policy, the GARD Analytics report, Public Policy and Real Energy Efficiency, and the DOE test procedures codified in the Code of Federal Regulations at 10 CFR Part 430, as well as any other relevant literature. The review will comment on whether one measure of energy efficiency or another (point-of-use or full fuel-cycle) improves the efficacy of the rulemaking process over the other. The committee will write a letter report on its review and conclusions.



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Attachment A Statement of Task The National Research Council will appoint a committee to conduct a review of the U.S. Department of Energy’s appliance standards program. The committee’s task is to evaluate or critique the methodology used for setting energy conservation standards for the purpose of determining whether site (point of use) or source (full fuel cycle) energy efficiency measures best serve the goals of energy conservation standards. The committee may seek to answer questions such as the following: • Are available data on appliance and commercial equipment on both point-of-use and/or full fuel-cycle energy use appropriate for the studies undertaken? Are there uncertainties with the data? • Are the models and analyses used appropriate for the studies undertaken? • Does the measure of energy efficiency and/or energy use (point-of-use or full fuel- cycle) impact the ability of the public to participate in the appliance standards rulemaking process? • Does the measure of energy efficiency and/or use affect the studies undertaken by DOE? The committee will not address whether energy conservation standards are appropriate government policy or what levels may or may not be appropriate. The committee will consider the technical support documents (TSDs) that have been developed for recent rulemakings (distribution transformers and residential furnaces and boilers), the report by Rand, Measures of Residential Energy Consumption and Their Relationships to DOE Policy, the GARD Analytics report, Public Policy and Real Energy Efficiency, and the DOE test procedures codified in the Code of Federal Regulations at 10 CFR Part 430, as well as any other relevant literature. The review will comment on whether one measure of energy efficiency or another (point-of-use or full fuel-cycle) improves the efficacy of the rulemaking process over the other. The committee will write a letter report on its review and conclusions. 16