Attachment G
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

James W. Dally (Chair), University of Maryland, College Park. James W. Dally (NAE) is professor emeritus, University of Maryland, College Park. Dr. Dally has had a distinguished career in industry, government, and academia and is the former dean of the College of Engineering at the University of Rhode Island. Dr. Dally is Glenn L. Martin Institute Professor of Engineering (emeritus) at the University of Maryland at College Park. His former positions include senior research engineer, Armour Research Foundation; assistant director research, Illinois Institute of Technology Research Institute; and senior engineer, International Business Machines Corporation. Currently, he is also an independent consultant. Dr. Dally is a mechanical engineer and the author or co-author of six books, including engineering textbooks on experimental stress analysis, engineering design, instrumentation, and the packaging of electronic systems, and has published approximately 200 research papers. He has served on a number of National Research Council (NRC) committees such as the Committee on Alternatives for Controlling the Release of Solid Materials from Nuclear Regulatory Commission-Licensed Facilities, the Panel on Prospective Benefits of DOE/EERE’s Distributed Energy Resources R&D Program, and the Panel on Air and Ground Vehicle Technology for the Army Research Laboratory Technical Assessment Board. He has a B.S. and an M.S. from the Carnegie Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. from the Illinois Institute of Technology.


David H. Archer, Westinghouse Electric Corporation [retired]. David H. Archer (NAE) is an adjunct professor, Carnegie Mellon University. He has earned a B.S. in chemical engineering and mathematics from Carnegie Mellon University and a Ph.D. from the University of Delaware. He is a consulting engineer from the Westinghouse Corporation. He has extensive experience in the development, design, and evaluation of innovative fossil and nuclear-fueled power generation systems. His work has included basic studies of flame behavior and process equipment dynamics as well as the applications of high-temperature solid oxide fuels, coal gasifiers and fluidized bed combustors, hot gas cleaning units, and combustion turbines. He is currently involved at Carnegie Mellon in the development of advanced energy supply Committee for the Disposal of the Chemical Weapons Stock Pile, the Committee on R&D Opportunities for Advanced Fossil Fueled Energy Complexes, and the Committee Investigating Methods for the Evaluation of DOE/EERE Programs. He joined Westinghouse in 1960, retired, and joined Carnegie Mellon in 1990.


Ellen Berman, Consumer Energy Council of America. Ellen Berman has a 40-year career that spans the intersection of science and technology. She served as president of the Consumer Energy Council of America from its founding in 1973 until her retirement and the organization’s closing in 2006. Under Ms. Berman’s leadership, CECA was one of the leading public interest organizations in the United States focusing on the energy, telecommunications, and other industries providing essential services for consumers. Throughout her tenure as leader of CECA, Ms. Berman sought to advance the public’s understanding of the interrelationship of energy policy and the environment, transportation, telecommunications, and other disciplines. She directed the publication and dissemination of nearly 500 reports; technical, economic, and policy analyses; public testimony; and brochures, pamphlets, articles, official documents, consumer



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 33
Attachment G Biographical Sketches of Committee Members James W. Dally (Chair), University of Maryland, College Park. James W. Dally (NAE) is professor emeritus, University of Maryland, College Park. Dr. Dally has had a distinguished career in industry, government, and academia and is the former dean of the College of Engineering at the University of Rhode Island. Dr. Dally is Glenn L. Martin Institute Professor of Engineering (emeritus) at the University of Maryland at College Park. His former positions include senior research engineer, Armour Research Foundation; assistant director research, Illinois Institute of Technology Research Institute; and senior engineer, International Business Machines Corporation. Currently, he is also an independent consultant. Dr. Dally is a mechanical engineer and the author or co-author of six books, including engineering textbooks on experimental stress analysis, engineering design, instrumentation, and the packaging of electronic systems, and has published approximately 200 research papers. He has served on a number of National Research Council (NRC) committees such as the Committee on Alternatives for Controlling the Release of Solid Materials from Nuclear Regulatory Commission-Licensed Facilities, the Panel on Prospective Benefits of DOE/EERE’s Distributed Energy Resources R&D Program, and the Panel on Air and Ground Vehicle Technology for the Army Research Laboratory Technical Assessment Board. He has a B.S. and an M.S. from the Carnegie Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. from the Illinois Institute of Technology. David H. Archer, Westinghouse Electric Corporation [retired]. David H. Archer (NAE) is an adjunct professor, Carnegie Mellon University. He has earned a B.S. in chemical engineering and mathematics from Carnegie Mellon University and a Ph.D. from the University of Delaware. He is a consulting engineer from the Westinghouse Corporation. He has extensive experience in the development, design, and evaluation of innovative fossil and nuclear-fueled power generation systems. His work has included basic studies of flame behavior and process equipment dynamics as well as the applications of high-temperature solid oxide fuels, coal gasifiers and fluidized bed combustors, hot gas cleaning units, and combustion turbines. He is currently involved at Carnegie Mellon in the development of advanced energy supply Committee for the Disposal of the Chemical Weapons Stock Pile, the Committee on R&D Opportunities for Advanced Fossil Fueled Energy Complexes, and the Committee Investigating Methods for the Evaluation of DOE/EERE Programs. He joined Westinghouse in 1960, retired, and joined Carnegie Mellon in 1990. Ellen Berman, Consumer Energy Council of America. Ellen Berman has a 40-year career that spans the intersection of science and technology. She served as president of the Consumer Energy Council of America from its founding in 1973 until her retirement and the organization’s closing in 2006. Under Ms. Berman’s leadership, CECA was one of the leading public interest organizations in the United States focusing on the energy, telecommunications, and other industries providing essential services for consumers. Throughout her tenure as leader of CECA, Ms. Berman sought to advance the public’s understanding of the interrelationship of energy policy and the environment, transportation, telecommunications, and other disciplines. She directed the publication and dissemination of nearly 500 reports; technical, economic, and policy analyses; public testimony; and brochures, pamphlets, articles, official documents, consumer 33

OCR for page 33
guides, and op-ed pieces. Ms. Berman has served on numerous national energy policy committees. She continues to be an active member of the Aspen Institute Energy Policy Forum. She served on the Council on Competitiveness National Innovation Initiative. She serves on the Advisory Council of the Women’s Council on Energy and the Environment. In 2004, Ms. Berman was awarded a Key Women in Energy in the Americas Pathfinder and Trailblazer Award. In the past she served on the Committee on Energy and Economic Development of the NAACP; the Magnetic Fusion Research and Development Advisory Committee and the Residential Energy Conservation Advisory Committee of the Office of Technology Assessment of the U.S. Congress; the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy’s Building Efficiency Program; and the Secretary of Energy’s Fuel Oil Marketing Advisory Committee. She was invited by the White House and the Japanese Ministry of International Trade and Industry to participate in a month-long executive business study program in Japan. Ms. Berman served as 2008 chair and 2007 co-chair of the 2007 Sarasota International Design Summit, a sustainable design initiative sponsored by the Ringling College of Art and Design in Sarasota, Florida. Ms. Berman holds a B.A. in Russian language and literature from Barnard College of Columbia University. Ramon L. Espino, University of Virginia. Ramon L. Espino is currently research professor, University of Virginia, Charlottesville; he has been on the faculty since 1999. Prior to joining the Department of Chemical Engineering, he was with ExxonMobil for 26 years. He held a number of research management positions in petroleum exploration and production, petroleum process and products, alternative fuels and petrochemicals. He has published about 20 technical articles and holds 9 patents. Dr. Espino’s research interests focus on fuel cell technology, specifically in the development of processors that convert clean fuels into hydrogen and of fuel cell anodes that are resistant to carbon monoxide poisoning. Another area of interest is the conversion of methane to clean liquid fuels and specifically the development of catalysts for the selective partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas. He served on the NRC Committee on R&D Opportunities for Advanced Fossil-Fueled Energy Complexes, the NRC Committee on Review of DOE/EERE’s Vision 21 R&D Program, and the NRC Committee on Prospective Evaluation of Applied Energy Research and Development at DOE/EERE (Phase One and Two). He received a B.S. degree in chemical engineering from Louisiana State University, and an M.S. and a doctor of science in chemical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. David Hungerford, California Energy Commission. David Hungerford is the special advisor to Commissioner Arthur Rosenfeld at the California Energy Commission. He most recently served as the Energy Commission’s lead staff on demand response policy development. He was the facilitator of a committee formed to oversee measurement and evaluation of Demand Response programs and rate designs approved by the California Public Utilities Commission, as well as the facilitator of a working group set up by the California Public Utilities Commission to develop programs and tariffs for large commercial and industrial customers. Dr. Hungerford’s professional career has focused on conducting and overseeing evaluation research of energy efficiency and demand response programs and using those results to analyze the impacts of policy change for the purpose of developing and guiding policy initiatives. He has also served on numerous technical advisory committees for investor-owned utility programs and public interest energy research (PIER) projects. Since 2003, He has served on the advisory group overseeing PIER demand response research at the Demand Response Research Center at 34

OCR for page 33
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and as a member of the technical advisory panel for the San Diego Gas & Electric Advanced Metering Infrastructure project. His professional focus is in energy policy analysis and his research interests are in technology/society issues, technology adoption, consumer behavior, and social change applied to the problem of energy consumption. He received his Ph.D. in human ecology from the University of California, Davis and holds a B.A. in English and in environmental studies from Baylor University. Steven Nadel, American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy. Steven Nadel is executive director of the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE), Washington, D.C., where he has worked since 1989. He is responsible for overall management of the organization including supervising program directors, fund-raising, overseeing administrative systems, and working with the board of directors. Prior to becoming the executive director, Mr. Nadel served at deputy director and also led ACEEE’s Buildings and Equipment Program and Utilities Program for many years. With the ACEEE Buildings Program he has worked on appliance and equipment efficiency standards, building codes, and market transformation programs. He led successful efforts to incorporate lamp, motor and HVAC standards and luminaire and office equipment labeling in the federal Energy Policy Act of 1992 and to include standards on 15 new products in the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Both are now law. He continues to play a major role on U.S. efficiency standards and market transformation programs. With the ACEEE Utilities Program he helped plan, profile, and evaluate energy efficiency programs for many years, and remains active in the development of public benefit programs and policies in several states and in the development of programs to reduce peak electric demand in response to recent electric reliability problems. Mr. Nadel has led or assisted on numerous research projects, leading to over 100 published papers. In early 2006 he authored a report on energy efficiency resource standards (energy-savings targets for utilities) and since that time has provided assistance to several states and members of Congress working on legislative and regulatory proposals. He has an M.S. in energy management from the New York Institute of Technology and a B.A. in government and an M.A. in environmental studies from Wesleyan University in Connecticut. Richard K. Newell, Duke University. Richard G. Newell is the Gendell Associate Professor of Energy and Environmental Economics at the Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences, Duke University. He is a University Fellow at Resources for the Future, Washington, D.C. He recently served as the senior economist for energy and environment on the President’s Council of Economic Advisers, where he advised on policy issues ranging from automobile fuel economy and renewable fuels to management of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Committee on National Science Foundation Innovation Inducement Prizes, the NAS Committee on Energy R&D, the National Petroleum Council Global Oil and Gas Study Committee, the Advisory Board of the Automotive X-Prize, and the Editorial Board of the journal Energy Economics. He has served as an independent expert reviewer and advisor for governmental, non-governmental, international, and private institutions including the National Commission on Energy Policy, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Energy Information Administration, the U.S. National Science Foundation, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the Pew Center on Global Climate Change, and others. He holds a Ph.D. from Harvard 35

OCR for page 33
University, a master in public affairs (M.P.A.) from Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, and a B.S. and a B.A. from Rutgers University. Reinhard Radermacher, University of Maryland, College Park. Reinhard Radermacher is a professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Maryland. He has 30 years of experience in research and development of energy conversion systems in general and CHP (Cooling Heating and Power) Systems and air-conditioning/heat pumping devices in particular. He is an internationally recognized expert in the use of working fluid mixtures. Dr. Radermacher founded the Energy Laboratory in 1983 and is the director and co-founder of the Center for Environmental Energy Engineering (CEEE) at the University of Maryland. The center is taking the lead in developing energy conversion systems that meet environmental and economic concerns. Dr. Radermacher’s service includes international activities such as being the U.S. representative of the International Energy Agency Annexes 13 and 34, past vice president of Commission B1, and president of Commission B2 of the International Institute of Refrigeration (IIR). He is an honorary member of the IIR and has been invited for lecture tours to Europe, China, Japan, Korea, and South America. He also serves as the coordinator of the Student Exchange Program for the University of Maryland, College of Engineering. Nationally, he is an active fellow of the American Society of Heating Refrigeration and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) and a member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). His work has resulted in more than 150 publications, as well as numerous invention records and 10 patents, and he co-authored three books. He serves as the editor ASHRAE’s HVAC&R Research journal starting in July 2002. He holds an M.S. and a Ph.D. in physics from the Munich Institute of Technology and was a visiting scientist and NATO scholar at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Phyllis Reha, Minnesota Public Utilities Commission. Phyllis A. Reha was appointed to the Minnesota Public Utilities Commission (PUC) by Governor Jesse Ventura on May 16, 2001, and reappointed by Governor Tim Pawlenty on June 26, 2007, and serves as its vice chair. Commissioner Reha has been active in a number of utility and energy organizations during her tenure as a PUC commissioner. She is a member of the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) and currently serves as the chair of the Committee on Energy Resources and the Environment. She is also a member of and past president of the Mid-America Regulatory Conference. Commissioner Reha also serves on the advisory councils of the Electric Power Research Institute; the New Mexico State University Center for Public Utilities; and the National Council on Electricity Policy. Recently she was selected as one of seven commissioners nationally to participate on a leadership group, sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy, whose charge was to develop a National Energy Efficiency Action Plan. She is also co-chair of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission/NARUC Demand Response Collaborative, which will explore how to coordinate federal and state approaches to electricity demand response policies and practices. Commissioner Reha has a B.A. degree from the University of Minnesota and a J.D. from the University of Minnesota Law School. Eric Williams, Arizona State University. Eric Williams is assistant professor in civil and environmental engineering and in the School of Sustainability. As part of his responsibilities, he is also developing a program in Earth Systems Engineering and Management. Before joining 36

OCR for page 33
Arizona State University, he spent a year as visiting faculty at civil and environmental engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, preceded by eight years in Tokyo at United Nations University where he conducted research related to information technology and the environment. His research interests include industrial ecology, life cycle assessment, information technology (IT), and energy systems, with a focus on the environmental assessment and management of IT hardware. In addition to IT-related issues, Dr. Williams is also working on the effects of development and urbanization on energy demand in industrializing nations, including analysis of relationships between infrastructure provision and transport-related carbon dioxide emissions in Asia and projections of future energy demand of the Chinese iron/steel sector, hybrid life cycle assessment (which combines process and economic input-output techniques), uncertainty analysis in industrial ecology, and sector-level forecasting of technological change/growth. Dr. Williams earned degrees in physics at Macalester College, in St. Paul (B.A.) and the State University of New York, Stony Brook (Ph.D.). James L. Wolf, Independent Consultant. James Wolf is an independent consultant working with private companies, governments, and foundations on energy and climate change issues. He was formerly vice president of energy and environmental markets for Honeywell, Inc. where he focused on business development opportunities to develop new products and services and market existing services to energy and environmental concerns. Previously, he was executive director at the Alliance to Save Energy, a nonprofit coalition whose board of directors is composed of U.S. senators, chief executive officers of major corporations, and environmental leaders. He also served as acting deputy assistant administrator for policy and planning with the U.S. Department of Commerce’s National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, where he helped design and supervise policies and programs addressing marine pollution, global climate change, alternative energy resources, and international scientific research protocols. Mr. Wolf has a J.D. degree from Harvard Law School. 37