Appendix A
Biographical Information

Committee on Water Resources Activities at the U.S. Geological Survey

George R. Hallberg, Chair, is a principal with the Cadmus Group, Inc., in Waltham, Massachusetts, conducting environmental research, regulatory analysis, and management services. Previously he was associate director and chief of environmental research at the University of Iowa’s environmental and public health laboratory and at the Iowa Department of Natural Resources. Dr. Hallberg was also an adjunct professor at both the University of Iowa and Iowa State University. He chaired the NRC Committee on Opportunities to Improve the USGS National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program and was on the NRC Committee on Mine Placement of Coal Combustion Wastes, Committee Assessment of Water Resources Research, and others, and served as a member of the Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources. He served on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Advisory Council for Environmental Policy and Technology and on the Office of Water’s Management Advisory Group. He is a National Associate of The National Academies. His research interests include environmental monitoring and assessment, agricultural-environmental impacts, chemical and nutrient fate and transport, contaminant occurrence and trends in drinking water, and health effects of environmental contaminants. Dr. Hallberg received a B.A. in geology from Augustana College and a Ph.D. in geology from the University of Iowa.


Lisa Alvarez-Cohen is the Fred and Claire Sauer Professor of Environmental Engineering as well as the Department Chair of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. She received her B.A. in engineering and applied science from Harvard University and her M.S. and Ph.D. in environmental engineering



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Appendix A Biographical Information Committee on Water Resources Activities at the U.S. Geological Survey George R. Hallberg, Chair, is a principal with the Cadmus Group, Inc., in Waltham, Massachusetts, conducting environmental research, regulatory analysis, and management services. Previously he was associate director and chief of environmental research at the University of Iowa’s environ- mental and public health laboratory and at the Iowa Department of Natural Resources. Dr. Hallberg was also an adjunct professor at both the Univer- sity of Iowa and Iowa State University. He chaired the NRC Committee on Opportunities to Improve the USGS National Water Quality Assess- ment (NAWQA) Program and was on the NRC Committee on Mine Placement of Coal Combustion Wastes, Committee Assessment of Water Resources Research, and others, and served as a member of the Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources. He served on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Advisory Council for Environmental Policy and Technology and on the Office of Water’s Management Advi- sory Group. He is a National Associate of The National Academies. His research interests include environmental monitoring and assessment, agri- cultural-environmental impacts, chemical and nutrient fate and transport, contaminant occurrence and trends in drinking water, and health effects of environmental contaminants. Dr. Hallberg received a B.A. in geology from Augustana College and a Ph.D. in geology from the University of Iowa. Lisa Alvarez-Cohen is the Fred and Claire Sauer Professor of Environ- mental Engineering as well as the Department Chair of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. She received her B.A. in engineering and applied science from Harvard University and her M.S. and Ph.D. in environmental engineering 109

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110 Appendix A and science from Stanford University. Her current research interests are the biotransformation of contaminants in the subsurface, including chlorin- ated solvents, MTBE, and NDMA, and innovative methods for evaluating in situ bioremediation, including molecular biology, isotope use, and direct microscopy. Dr. Alvarez-Cohen is an associate editor of Environmental Engineering Science and a Fellow of the American Academy for Microbi- ology. Her previous NRC service includes the Committee on USGS Water Resources Research, the Committee on In Situ Bioremediation, and the Committee on Source Removal of Contaminants in the Subsurface. Thomas Dunne (NAS) is a professor in the School of Environmental Sci- ence and Management at the University of California at Santa Barbara. He is a hydrologist and a geomorphologist, with research interests that include field and theoretical studies of drainage basin and hillslope evolution; sediment transport and floodplain sedimentation; debris flows and sedi- ment budgets of drainage basins. He served as a member of the WSTB Committee on Water Resources Research and Committee on Opportunities in the Hydrologic Sciences and was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1988 and to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1993. He has acted as a scientific advisor to the United Nations, the gov- ernments of Brazil, Taiwan, Kenya, Spain, the Philippines, Washington, Oregon, and several U.S. federal agencies. He is a recipient of the Ameri- can Geophysical Union Horton Award. Dr. Dunne holds a B.A. from Cambridge University and a Ph.D. in geography from The Johns Hopkins University. William H. Hooke is a Senior Policy Fellow and the Director of the At- mospheric Policy Program at the American Meteorological Society in Washington, DC. Prior to arriving at AMS in 2000, he worked for the Na- tional Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and antecedent agencies for 33 years. After six years of research with NOAA he moved into a series of management positions of increasing scope and responsibil- ity including Chief of the Wave Propagation Laboratory Atmospheric Studies Branch, Director of NOAA's Environmental Sciences Group (now the Forecast Systems Lab), Deputy Chief Scientist, and Acting Chief Sci- entist of NOAA. Between 1993 and 2000, he held two national responsi- bilities: Director of the U.S. Weather Research Program Office, and Chair of the interagency Subcommittee for Natural Disaster Reduction of the National Science and Technology Council, Committee on Environment and Natural Resources. He is a National Associate of The National Acad- emies. Dr. Hooke was a faculty member at the University of Colorado

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Appendix A 111 from 1969 to 1987, and served as a fellow of two NOAA Joint Institutes (CIRES, 1971-1977; CIRA 1987-2000). The author of over fifty refereed publications and co-author of one book, Dr. Hooke holds a B.S. (Physics Honors) from Swarthmore College (1964), and S.M. (1966) and Ph.D (1967) degrees from the University of Chicago. Dr. Hooke was elected to membership in the American Philosophical Society in 2006. Thomas L. Huntzinger has his own consulting business which currently coordinates the watershed restoration and protection efforts for Clinton Reservoir, a water supply to 120,000 people as part of the state of Kansas non point source protection program. He was previously a Senior Hy- drologist for Applied Ecological Services, Inc. He managed the firms con- sulting services for the Kansas City office and coordinated the engineering work on projects in the Kansas City office. His areas of expertise include hydrologic analysis, water management, water use and water quality. Prior to his consulting work, he spent eight years as the water appropriations program manager for the Kansas Department of Agriculture, Division of Water Resources directed by the Kansas Chief Engineer. He was respon- sible for water appropriations and water rights permits in Kansas. He worked 26 years for the U. S. Geological Survey as a hydrologist, district chief, and program manager. USGS assignments in Oklahoma, Louisiana, Kansas, and Nebraska included FEMA flood analysis, low flow character- istics, coastal flow monitoring and other coastal processes, groundwater analysis, hazardous waste site assessments, and team leader for the Platte River NAWQA project. He is a registered professional engineer in Kansas and Oklahoma and has BS and MS degrees in Agricultural Engineering. Holly E. Richter is the Upper San Pedro Program Director for The Nature Conservancy. She has worked for the Conservancy on riparian conserva- tion projects in the Western states for over 20 years. She was appointed to the Upper San Pedro Water District Organizing Board in 2007 by Gover- nor Napolitano, and also serves as the Conservancy’s lead representative on the Upper San Pedro Partnership, a regional consortium of 21 local, state and federal agencies including scientists, land managers, and deci- sion-makers. She serves as chair for the Partnership’s Technical Commit- tee (2000-2008) and is Vice Chair for the Partnership’s Executive Commit- tee (2006-2008). She also assists partner agencies with coordination of regional, cross-border water management and conservation projects within the bi-national San Pedro watershed. Her professional interests include regional groundwater management, riparian ecology and conservation, and environmental conflict resolution. Dr. Richter received a Cooperative

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112 Appendix A Conservation Award from the Department of the Interior in 2008, and is a member of the Arizona Hydrological Society and the Arizona Riparian Council. She received both her BS in Landscape Architecture and a Ph.D in Rangeland Ecosystem Science, specializing in riparian ecosystem mod- eling, from Colorado State University. Franklin W. Schwartz is a professor and the Ohio Eminent Scholar in hydrogeology at The Ohio State University. Dr. Schwartz’s research inter- ests encompass field and theoretical aspects of mass transport, contaminant hydrogeology, and watershed hydrology. He is coauthor of the texts Physi- cal and Chemical Hydrogeology, published in 1990 and 1998, and Founda- tions of Ground Water, published in 2003. He has received various awards recognizing his contributions to hydrogeology, including the O. E. Meinzer Award, the Excellence in Science and Engineering Award, and the M. King Hubbert Science Award. He was elected as a fellow of the American Geo- physical Union in 1992. In addition to his teaching and research, Dr. Schwartz acts as a consultant to government and industry, and he acts in various advisory capacities. He has served on various NRC panels and as a member of the Water Science and Technology Board. He received his Ph.D. in geology from the University of Illinois. Rebecca R. Sharitz is professor of plant biology at the University of Georgia and senior scientist at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory in Aiken, South Carolina, where she has been the Head of the Division of Wetlands Ecology. Her research focuses on ecological processes in wet- lands, including factors affecting the structure and function of bottomland hardwood and swamp forest ecosystems, responses of wetland communi- ties to environmental disturbances, and effects of land management prac- tices on nearby wetland systems. Dr. Sharitz has served on several NRC committees including the Committee on Restoration of the Greater Ever- glades Ecosystem (CROGEE) and the Committee on Restoration of Aquatic Ecosystems: Science, Technology and Public Policy. She has also served as Vice President, Treasurer, and Council member of the Ecological Society of America, and she was recently elected a Fellow in the Society of Wetland Scientists. She received a B.S. in biology from Roanoke Col- lege and a Ph.D. in botany and plant ecology from the University of North Carolina. Donald I. Siegel is a professor of geology at Syracuse University, where he teaches graduate courses in hydrogeology and aqueous geochemistry. He holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in geology from the University of Rhode

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Appendix A 113 Island and Pennsylvania State University, respectively, and a Ph.D. in hydrogeology from the University of Minnesota. His research interests are in solute transport at both local and regional scales, wetland-ground water interaction, and paleohydrogeology. Siegel is a recipient of the O. E. Meinzer Award, presented by the Hydrogeology Division of the Geological Society of America (GSA). He recently served as a counselor of GSA, and is an associate editor of the Hydrogeology Journal. He has been a member of numerous NRC committees including the Committee on Wetlands Char- acterization, Committee on Techniques for Assessing Ground Water Vulner- ability, and Committee on Review of the USGS National Streamflow Infor- mation Program. He chaired the Committee on River Science at the U.S. Geological Survey. He is a National Associate of The National Academies. Roland C. Steiner is Regional Water and Wastewater Manager for the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission. He is responsible for devel- oping and maintaining the major functional and financial relationships be- tween WSSC and adjacent utilities, including management and funding of cost-shared water supply reservoirs and advisory services, water curtail- ment agreements, and reconciliation of WSSC’s capital funding at several wastewater treatment plants. Previously he was Associate Director for Water Resources and Director of Cooperative Water Supply Operations on the Potomac for the Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin. There, he was responsible for directing the water resources program of the Commission including covering coordinated drought supply management of river and reservoir resources for the Washington, DC region. He is a Professional Engineer in Maryland, and a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers, American Water Works Association, and Water Envi- ronment Federation. He has a B.Sc. in Civil Engineering from the Univer- sity of Pennsylvania, and M.Sc. in Civil Engineering: Engineering- Economic-Planning from Stanford University, and a Ph.D. in Environ- mental Engineering from The Johns Hopkins University. David G. Tarboton is Professor, Utah Water Research Laboratory and De- partment of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Utah State University. His research and teaching is in the area of surface water hydrology. His research focuses on advancing the capability for hydrologic prediction by developing models that take advantage of new information and process understanding enabled by new technology. This includes the use of hydro- logic and geographic information systems and digital elevation models that take advantage of spatially distributed information for hydrologic predic- tion. His work has contributed to advances in terrain analysis for hydrol-

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114 Appendix A ogy, terrain stability mapping and stream sediment inputs, geomorphology, stochastic and nonparametric statistical methods in hydrology, and snow hydrology. He has served on the NRC committees on Review of the USGS National Streamflow Information Program and River Science at the U.S. Geological Survey. Dr. Tarboton received his B.S. in civil engineer- ing from the University of Natal in Durban, South Africa in 1981, then a M.S. and Sc.D. in civil engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1987 and 1990 respectively.