Appendix A
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Rand H. Fisher, Chair, is currently senior vice president for systems planning and engineering for The Aerospace Corporation. Before he retired from the U.S. Navy, RADM Fisher served concurrently as director of the Communications Acquisition and Operations Directorate within the National Reconnaissance Office, commander of the SPAWAR Space Field Activity for the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command, naval program executive officer (PEO) for Space Systems, and director of the Transformational Communications Office. He previously served as commander of the Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division in China Lake, California, and assistant commander for test and evaluation, Naval Air Systems Command. RADM Fisher has also served as the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command’s research and development program manager; as director of the Systems Program Management Division; as lead systems engineer for the Naval Space Technology Program; as deputy program manager and then as major program manager, Special Systems Program Office; and as major program manager, Advanced Systems Program Office. RADM Fisher graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy with a B.S. in physics and from the Naval Postgraduate School with an M.S. in physics. He has been awarded the Distinguished Service Medal, Defense Superior Service Medal, Legion of Merit, Defense Meritorious Service Medal, and various other service medals and awards.


J. Daniel Stewart, Vice Chair, is the associate vice president for research at the University of Tennessee (UT). Since September 2004, in this role, he supports the UT executive vice president in overseeing research activities at its five campuses across the state as well as its research activities with strategic partners such as the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which UT jointly manages with Battelle.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 41
Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Rand H. Fisher, Chair, is currently senior vice president for systems planning and engineering for The Aerospace Corporation. Before he retired from the U.S. Navy, RADM Fisher served concurrently as director of the Communications Acquisition and Operations Directorate within the National Reconnaissance Office, commander of the SPAWAR Space Field Activity for the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command, naval program executive officer (PEO) for Space Systems, and director of the Transformational Communications Office. He previously served as commander of the Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division in China Lake, California, and assistant commander for test and evaluation, Naval Air Systems Command. RADM Fisher has also served as the Space and Naval Warfare Sys- tems Command’s research and development program manager; as director of the Systems Program Management Division; as lead systems engineer for the Naval Space Technology Program; as deputy program manager and then as major pro- gram manager, Special Systems Program Office; and as major program manager, Advanced Systems Program Office. RADM Fisher graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy with a B.S. in physics and from the Naval Postgraduate School with an M.S. in physics. He has been awarded the Distinguished Service Medal, Defense Superior Service Medal, Legion of Merit, Defense Meritorious Service Medal, and various other service medals and awards. J. Daniel Stewart, Vice Chair, is the associate vice president for research at the University of Tennessee (UT). Since September 2004, in this role, he supports the UT executive vice president in overseeing research activities at its five cam- puses across the state as well as its research activities with strategic partners such as the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which UT jointly manages with Battelle. 

OCR for page 41
2 OPTIMIZING USAF AND DOD REVIEW OF AIR FORCE ACQUISITION PROGRAMS He also serves as an adjunct professor at the UT College of Business Administra - tion. Before joining UT, Dr. Stewart served as the executive director of the Air Force Material Command at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio. Dr. Stewart entered federal service in 1974 as a technology manager with the Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory at Edwards Air Force Base in California. Before that, he served with The Aerospace Corporation, providing systems engineering and tech - nical support to the Air Force’s Space and Missile Systems Organization. In 1981, he transferred to Eglin AFB in Florida, where he held various mid-level to senior management positions involving development planning, acquisition, and test and evaluation. Before becoming the first executive director for the Air Force Mate- rial Command, he served as the executive director for the Air Armament Center, with responsibility for the development, test, acquisition, and sustainment of air- delivered weapon systems. He is a Stanford University Sloan Fellow and served details in Washington, D.C., supporting the congressionally mandated 1995 and 2005 base realignment and closure activities. Dr. Stewart holds B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in aerospace engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology and a master’s degree in management science from Stanford University. As a member of the Senior Executive Service, he was awarded two Distinguished and three Meritorious Presidential Rank Awards. John A. Betti (NAE) is a retired Undersecretary of Defense for the Department of Defense (DOD). In that position at DOD, he had oversight responsibility for the Defense Research and Development and Acquisition process involving over $140 billion and 500,000 people. He also served as the National Armaments Director and the nation’s representative to NATO and to the Four Powers (United States, France, Germany, and Great Britain) National Armament Directors’ meet - ings. He was a member of the DOD Executive Committee and Defense Planning and Resources Board as well as chairman of the Defense Acquisition Board and the Defense Ethics Council. During his tenure with Ford Motor Company, his responsibilities included executive vice president of the Diversified Products Operation with responsibility for 12 businesses with total revenues of $13 bil - lion (1988 dollars), 95,000 people, manufacturing plants in the United States, Canada, Mexico, Brazil, and six European countries, and joint ventures in Japan, korea, and the United States. Six of the businesses engineered and manufactured electronic, electrical-mechanical, heating and air-conditioning, plastic, alumi- num and iron castings and glass components for the automotive industry. The nonautomotive businesses were Ford Aerospace ($1.5 billion revenue, defense and aerospace), Ford New Holland ($3 billion revenue, tractor and farm imple - ments), Rouge Steel ($1.5 billion revenue, steel), Philco Ford Brazil ($300 million revenue, television and VCR sets for Brazilian market), Ford Land Development (office buildings, shopping centers, hotels, and golf courses), and Hertz (automo - tive and equipment rentals). Mr. Betti also served as executive vice president for technical and operating staffs and was responsible for eight corporate staffs with

OCR for page 41
 APPENDIX A worldwide responsibilities in manufacturing and engineering; purchasing and supply; quality; environmental and safety; research; design; marketing; and the Alpha Project (responsible for developing innovative manufacturing, engineer- ing, product and business processes to ensure the company’s competitiveness for products, quality, and cost into the twenty-first century). Christopher L. Blake is the senior technical fellow for air system design and integration and the deputy to the vice president for enterprise process integration at Lockheed Martin Aeronautics (LM Aero). He is responsible for developing a solution to functional process integration to improve LM Aero program execution. He is also charged with improving the company’s approaches to system design and integration and ensuring that they represent company and industry best practice. Earlier, Mr. Blake served as the leader and technical expert of several key systems engineering efforts, including Enterprise Standard Planning Package Development, F-35 Functional Baseline Development, and the Aerial Common Sensor LM Aero Independent Review Team. He has served as a systems engineering technical authority in support of many LM Aero key programs and is widely acknowledged as a company expert on systems engineering matters. From 1971 to 2004, Mr. Blake was a civilian with the DOD Aeronautical Systems Division at Headquarters Air Force Materiel Command, accumulating 33 years as a proven systems engineer and program manager in advanced development, acquisition, manufacturing, and sustainment of aircraft weapons systems. He was a senior executive for the Air Force’s Aeronautical Systems Center and the Air Force Materiel Command. He held several key leadership positions: the associate director of plans and programs for the Air Force Materiel Command, primarily focused on base reallocation and closure (BRAC) planning, and director of engineering for the F-22A program and for the C-17 program. At LM Aero, Mr. Blake regularly represents the view of the customer to ensure LM Aero planning is in touch with customer expectations. A 1971 graduate of Wright State University with a B.S. degree in systems engineer- ing, Mr. Blake earned a first master’s degree in systems engineering in 1981, also from Wright State University, and a second master’s degree in systems manage- ment in 1989 from Stanford University’s Sloan Fellowship Program. Claude M. Bolton, Jr., became the executive in residence for the Defense Acqui- sition University (DAU) on January 3, 2008. In this position, Mr. Bolton supports the DAU president, faculty, and students with strategic planning, course develop - ment, and mentoring. Mr. Bolton’s primary focus is assisting the DAU president to achieve the congressional direction to recruit, retain, train, and educate the DOD acquisition workforce. Before that, Mr. Bolton served as the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology (ASAALT), serving as the Army acquisition executive (AAE), the senior procurement executive, and the science advisor to the Secretary. Mr. Bolton was also the senior R&D official for the Army and had principal responsibility for all Army matters related to logistics.

OCR for page 41
 OPTIMIZING USAF AND DOD REVIEW OF AIR FORCE ACQUISITION PROGRAMS In his role as ASAALT/AAE, Mr. Bolton led the Army’s acquisition function and its acquisition management system. He oversaw the life-cycle management and sustainment of Army weapons systems and equipment, from R&D through test, evaluation, acquisition, logistics, fielding, and disposition. He oversaw the Army’s program for the elimination of chemical weapons program and had oversight and executive authority over the Project and Contracting Office charged with Iraq reconstruction. Mr. Bolton was responsible for appointing, managing, and evaluating program executive officers as well as managing the Army Acquisition Corps and Army Acquisition Workforce. A veteran of more than 30 years of active military service, Mr. Bolton retired as a major general in the Air Force following a highly decorated career. In 1969, Mr. Bolton received his Air Force commission through the University of Nebraska’s Air Force ROTC program. Mr. Bolton earned a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from the University of Nebraska; a master’s in management from Troy State University; and a master’s in national security and strategic studies from the Naval War College. In July 2006, he was awarded a doctorate in science from Cranfield University in England. In May 2007, he was awarded an Honorary Doctor of Science degree from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, his alma mater. Allan v. Burman is president of Jefferson Solutions, a division of the Jefferson Consulting Group, LLC. Under his leadership, Solutions has provided change management services and/or acquisition reform training to many federal depart - ments and agencies and other public service entities. He also has advised firms, congressional committees, and federal and state agencies on management and acquisition reform matters and regularly speaks to groups on related topics. Before joining The Jefferson Group in 1994, Dr. Burman had a lengthy career in the federal government, serving in policy positions in the White House’s Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and in the Office of the Secretary of Defense. As the former administrator for federal procurement policy, he had the longest tenure of any administrator, serving in the Executive Office of the President under Presidents Reagan, Bush, and Clinton. As a member of the Senior Executive Ser- vice, Dr. Burman served in the early 1980s in OMB’s National Security Division as chief of the Air Force Branch and was the first OMB Branch Chief to receive a Presidential Rank Award. Dr. Burman is a fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration, a principal of the Council for Excellence in Government, a director of the Procurement Round Table, a fellow and member of the board of advisors to the National Contract Management Association, and an honorary member of the National Defense Industrial Association. He is also an adjunct professor at the International Law Institute (ILI), a member of ILI’s Procurement Advisory Board, and an adjunct professor at George Mason University. John T. Dillard is a senior lecturer in the Graduate School of Business and Public Policy at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California. He joined the

OCR for page 41
 APPENDIX A faculty in the fall of 2000 upon his retirement from the U.S. Army at the rank of Colonel. In the mid-1980s, he served as manager of Close Combat Systems at Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey, and worked across a myriad of technologies and system concepts that have evolved into fielded products, such as the M-4 carbine, the 120-mm mortar, and the sniper weapon. Later, he was an assistant project man- ager for development of both the Army tactical missile system and the JAVELIN antitank weapon system at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. These systems incorporate state-of-the-art technologies and are still in sustained production and fielding. Both have proved to be highly effective in combat. As product manager for the Joint Advanced Special Operations Radio System at Fort Monmouth, New Jersey, he successfully completed a 3-year prototyping effort on time and under budget. In 1998, he was appointed to head all DOD contract administration in the New York metropolitan area. His organization won the President’s Quality Award, the federal government’s equivalent to the Malcolm Baldrige Award for Quality, and held the title for 2 years. He has also served on the faculty of the U.S. Army War College and is now an adjunct professor for the University of California at Santa Cruz, educating Silicon Valley public and private industry professionals in project management. With extensive experience in system development and procurement, his research has primarily focused on defense acquisition policy changes and their implications. His work on centralized control of defense acquisition programs was used by the Defense Science Board in its 2005 report on management oversight in acquisition organizations and was again cited in the study Beyond Goldwater- Nichols on defense acquisition reform by the Center for Strategic and International Studies. His current research is oriented to spiral development and computational modeling of evolutionary acquisition. Charles E. Franklin is the retired vice president of the Raytheon Company Evalu- ation Team. He was appointed to this position in September 2003. General Franklin joined Raytheon Company in 1998, and until his current assignment, served as president of its Integrated Defense Systems business. Before that, he served as vice president and general manager of the Raytheon Electronic Systems’ Air and Missile Defense Systems business unit. Before joining Raytheon, he worked for Lockheed Martin-Sanders in Nashua, New Hampshire, as vice president for Programs and Mission Success and vice president for quality and mission success. Before Lockheed, General Franklin held the rank of lieutenant general, U.S. Air Force, and was commander of the Electronic Systems Center, Air Force Materiel Command, Hanscom Air Force Base. He was responsible for the Air Force’s Cen - ter of Excellence, with more than 500 command and control, communications, and intelligence systems, handling more than $3 billion in programs annually. While at Hanscom, he also served as deputy commander, Tactical Systems, and deputy commander for the Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System. Before transferring to Hanscom Air Force Base, General Franklin held the position of program executive officer, Tactical and Airlift Programs, Air Force Executive

OCR for page 41
 OPTIMIZING USAF AND DOD REVIEW OF AIR FORCE ACQUISITION PROGRAMS Office Organization, in Washington, D.C. His earlier assignments included system program director, advanced medium-range air-to-air missiles at Eglin Air Force Base, and commander, Rome Air Development Center, at Griffiss Air Force Base. General Franklin earned a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology and a master’s degree in aeronautical-mechanical engineering from the Air Force Institute of Technology. Charles L. Johnson II is vice president of Air Force Networks and Support Systems for Boeing Integrated Defense Systems. Before joining Boeing, he was a lieutenant general serving as both the PEO for C2ISR and as the Commander for the Electronic Systems Center (ESC), Hanscom Air Force Base. The center’s mission is to acquire C2ISR systems and all cryptologic systems for the Air Force, Joint Services, and COCOMS. The organization comprises more than 12,000 people located at six sites throughout the United States. The men and women of the ESC manage more than $5 billion in programs annually in support of the Air Force and joint and coalition forces. General Johnson has performed the duties of an operations group commander and of a program director of the C-141 and C-17 system program offices, respectively. He was a command pilot with more than 4,000 hours in the B-52G, C-5A/B, C-17, C-141A/B, CH-3E, kC-135R, UH-1N, and F-I5E. Previously, the general was Commander, Oklahoma City Air Logistics Center, and Installation Commander, Tinker Air Force Base. General Johnson received a B.S. in civil engineering from the U.S. Air Force Academy and an M.S. in engineering administration and law from George Washington University. He also completed a business program on executive development and leadership at the University of Illinois; a program for senior executives in national and international study at the John F. kennedy School of Government, Harvard University; and an acquisition professional development program, Certified Level III Program Management, at Defense Systems Management College. Leslie F. kenne is an independent consultant providing expertise and guidance to industry in the areas of program management, logistics, test and evaluation, and ethics compliance. She retired from the U.S. Air Force in 2003 after 32 years of military service. She serves on three corporate boards: Harris Corporation, Unisys, and now SRI International. General kenne also serves on the National Research Council’s Air Force Studies Board, which performs studies on topics selected by Air Force leadership. General kenne graduated from Auburn University with a degree in aerospace engineering and entered the Air Force in 1971 as a distin- guished graduate of the ROTC program. She served as a flight line maintenance officer in operations and attended the U.S. Air Force Test Pilot School in 1974. She served in various test and evaluation project management and supervisory posi - tions in development, operational, and joint testing organizations during a 12-year period. General kenne directed three major development programs while in the Air Force: the low-altitude navigation and targeting infrared system for night, the

OCR for page 41
 APPENDIX A F-16, and the Joint Strike Fighter. She also served as vice commander of the Aero- nautical Systems Center at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base and the Sacramento Air Logistics Center at McClellan Air Force Base. Her last two positions before retiring were commander of the Electronic Systems Center at Hanscom Air Force Base and the deputy chief of staff for warfighting integration at the Pentagon. Andrew P. Sage (NAE) is the founding dean emeritus of the School of Informa- tion Technology and Engineering and a professor at George Mason University. He is an elected fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the International Council on Systems Engineering. He is the editor of the John Wiley textbook series on systems engineering and management, the INCOSE Wiley journal Systems Engineering, and is coeditor of Information, Knowledge, and Systems Management. He edited IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics from January 1972 through December 1998 and also served for 2 years as presi - dent of the IEEE SMC Society. In 1994 he received the Donald G. Fink Prize from the IEEE and a Superior Public Service Award for his service on the CNA Corporation board of trustees from the U.S. Secretary of the Navy. In 2000, he received the Simon Ramo Medal from the IEEE in recognition of his contribu - tions to systems engineering and an IEEE Third Millennium Medal. In 2002, he received an Eta kappa Nu Eminent Membership Award and the INCOSE Pioneer Award. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2004 for contributions to the theory and practice of systems engineering and systems management. In 2007, he was elected as a charter member of the Omega Alpha systems engineering honor society. His interests include systems engineering and management efforts in a variety of application areas, including systems integration and architecting, reengineering, engineering economic systems, and sustainable development. Dr. Sage received a B.S.E.E. degree from the Citadel, a S.M.E.E. degree from MIT, and a Ph.D. from Purdue, the last in 1960. He has been a faculty member at several universities and in 1984 became First American Bank Professor of Information Technology and Engineering at George Mason University and the first dean of its School of Information Technology and Engineering. Mark D. Schaeffer is executive director and chief systems engineer with ManTech SRS. Before that he was director of systems and software engineer- ing (SSE), Office of the Under Secretary of Defense (Acquisition, Technology and Logistics). As director of SSE he served as the department’s chief engi - neer responsible for policy, guidance, and education and training for systems engineering, development test and evaluation, risk management, reliability and maintainability, quality, production, and manufacturing. In addition, he provided engineering and development T&E support to approximately 180 DOD programs for fixed, rotary, and unmanned aircraft; land and sea systems; tactical missiles; communication; and command and control domains. He was the focal point

OCR for page 41
8 OPTIMIZING USAF AND DOD REVIEW OF AIR FORCE ACQUISITION PROGRAMS for the department’s efforts to revitalize systems engineering that included new DOD-wide SE policy, guidance and related education and training, establish - ment and leadership of a forum of chief engineers from the military services and agencies within DOD and restructuring of engineering assessments leading to major milestone review by the Defense Acquisition Board. Before SSE, he served as DARPA’s chief operating officer and chief information officer with direct responsibility for day-to-day operations of all DARPA security (physical and programmatic), automated information systems, human resources, and facili- ties. He has held positions in the Navy Department, the Presidential Commission on Merchant Marine and Defense, and served on the congressional professional staff. Schaeffer received a B.S.M.E. from California State University and has completed executive education at MIT and Duke University. He was the DOD sponsor of the NDIA Systems Engineering Division; a DOD representative to INCOSE’s Corporate Advisory Board; chairman, Stevens Institute of Technol - ogy, School of Systems and Enterprise Advisory Board; and chairman of the NATO Life Cycle Management Group and its Continuous Acquisition and Life Cycle Support Management Board. george R. Schneiter is currently a consultant to Boeing Integrated Defense Systems and to the Institute for Defense Analyses, the Defense Science Board, and the Missile Defense Agency. Before that he held several positions with the Office of the Secretary of Defense, including director, Strategic and Tactical Systems, Office of the Under Secretary of Defense (Acquisition, Technology and Logistics), with responsibility for acquisition oversight of all DOD strategic and tactical sys - tems (aircraft, missiles, ships, land vehicles, and electronic warfare) and related arms control implementation and compliance, developmental test and evaluation, and foreign comparative testing. He has also held positions with the Center for Naval Analyses as well as The Aerospace Corporation. Dr. Schneiter received a B.S.M.E., an M.S.M.E., and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Purdue University. He received the Distinguished Executive Presidential Award; the Meritorious Executive Presidential Award (three times); the DOD Distinguished Civilian Service Medal (three times); Outstanding Mechanical Engineer, Purdue University School of Mechanical Engineering; Commander, National Order of Merit, Government of France; and is a fellow of the American Institute of Aero - nautics and Astronautics. Robert J. Skalamera is a professional consultant, working with selected clients in government, industry, and academia. His services include systems engineer- ing, technical management, and risk management in major systems acquisition and sustainment. He was the recipient of the 2007 Lt Gen Thomas R. Ferguson Jr. Award for Systems Engineering Leadership of the National Defense Industrial Association. Before that, Mr. Skalamera was the Deputy Director of Systems and Software Engineering for the Office of the Secretary of Defense in Washington,

OCR for page 41
9 APPENDIX A D.C. Mr. Skalamera is an accomplished leader in applied systems engineering with more than 35 years of experience in defense systems, research, development, integration, test, and sustainment. He is recognized nationally and internationally for expertise in systems engineering, risk management, enterprise development, total life-cycle management, program assessment, and related subordinate fields in both technical and technical management domains. Richard Szafranski is a partner in Toffler Associates, where he was a found- ing member in 1996, a managing partner from 2000 through 2006, and is now responsible for managing its international growth. Toffler Associates has clients in Belgium, Germany, Italy, The Netherlands, South korea, and Sweden, along with global firms headquartered in the United States. Toffler Associates is a strategic planning and advisory firm that helps organizations transition to a knowledge- based economy. His consulting portfolio includes working with CEOs, COOs, senior executives, and officials of U.S. and international government agencies in global defense, security, aerospace, manufacturing, communications, and services. He helps clients focus on competitive strategies, globalization, branding, new ven- tures, mergers and acquisitions, and organizational transformation and is a coach for many senior executives. Mr. Szafranski served as an independent director on the board of directors for SBS Technologies, Inc., an embedded computer com - pany, from 2003 until its acquisition by General Electric, chairing the Manage - ment Development and Compensation Committee and serving on the Corporate Governance and Nominating Committee. As committee chair he introduced the company’s first formal executive pay-for-performance program. He also served as an independent director on the board of directors for the Ceridian Corpora - tion, a business services and benefits company, from 2006, taking the company from a publicly traded company to a private company in 2007. He has completed executive education at the Harvard Business School. Randall S. Weidenheimer is currently director of program integration in the XonTech Systems operating unit of Northrop Grumman’s Information Systems Sector. Colonel Weidenheimer began his career at the Air Force’s space acquisi- tion organization. He first worked on a program to measure the space environment and moved on to the Advanced Warning System program, which developed tech- nology for the next-generation strategic warning infrared surveillance satellites. Upon graduation from the University of Arizona with a master’s degree in physics, he began working at the Air Force Space Technology Center. He worked on a variety of acquisition, tracking, and pointing and directed energy weapon system technology efforts related to the Strategic Defense Initiative. He worked on both laser and neutral particle beam programs, moving from action officer to branch chief to division chief. In his last Air Force assignment, Colonel Weidenheimer served as the system program director and then as the Wing Commander, for the SBIRS Wing, which had responsibility for developing and fielding both the legacy

OCR for page 41
0 OPTIMIZING USAF AND DOD REVIEW OF AIR FORCE ACQUISITION PROGRAMS Defense Support Program satellites and the new SBIRS high satellites and pay - loads. Colonel Weidenheimer led a program office of 500 people, with a portfolio value of more than $40 billion and annual budgets in excess of $700 million. He also took a major defense acquisition program through the Nunn-McCurdy breach process. He retired from the Air Force in 2007 and joined Northrop Grumman shortly thereafter. Rebecca A. Winston is president of Winston Strategic Management Consultants. She is a former chair of the board of the Project Management Institute (PMI) and is a fellow of the institute. An expert on project management in the fields of research and development, energy, environmental restoration, and national secu - rity, she is known throughout the United States and globally as a leader in program and project management, primarily on programs funded by the U.S. government. She is a graduate of the University of Nebraska’s College of Law, has a B.S. in education from Nebraska Wesleyan University, and an M.S. in biology from Idaho State University. She is a licensed attorney in Iowa and Nebraska. Active in the PMI since 1993, Ms. Winston helped pioneer PMI’s Specific Interest Groups (SIGs) in the 1990s, including the Project Earth and government SIGs, and was a founder and first co-chair of the Women in Project Management SIG. She served two terms on the PMI board of directors as director at large, secretary-treasurer, vice chair, and chair. She is also a member of the American Bar Association and the Association of Female Executives. Ms. Winston currently serves as a consul - tant to organizations such as the National Nuclear Security Administration, the Department of Energy, and the Department of Homeland Security on program and project management, project reviews, risk management, and vulnerability assessments. She has extensive experience in the areas of national defense and security and has worked closely with local, regional, and national officials, includ- ing Congress and the Pentagon.