JOHN C. MATHER is a senior astrophysicist in the Observational Cosmology Laboratory at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). His research centers on infrared astronomy and cosmology. As a National Research Council postdoctoral fellow at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (New York), he led the proposal efforts for the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) (1974–1976) and came to GSFC to be the study scientist (1976–1988), project scientist (1988–1998), and the principal investigator for the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) on COBE. He and his team showed that the cosmic microwave background radiation has a blackbody spectrum within 50 parts per million, confirming the Big Bang theory to extraordinary accuracy. As senior project scientist (1995–present) for the James Webb Space Telescope, he leads the science team and represents scientific interests within the project management. He is the recipient of many awards, including the Nobel Prize in Physics (2006) with George Smoot for the COBE work.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 2
JOHN C. MATHER is a senior astrophysicist in the Observational Cosmology Labora- tory at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). His research centers on infrared astronomy and cosmology. As a National Research Council postdoctoral fellow at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (New York), he led the proposal efforts for the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) (1974–1976) and came to GSFC to be the study scientist (1976–1988), project scientist (1988–1998), and the principal investigator for the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) on COBE. He and his team showed that the cosmic microwave background radiation has a blackbody spectrum within 50 parts per million, confirming the Big Bang theory to extraordinary accuracy. As senior project scientist (1995–present) for the James Webb Space Telescope, he leads the science team and represents scientific interests within the project management. He is the recipient of many awards, including the Nobel Prize in Physics (2006) with George Smoot for the COBE work.