Appendix C
Planning Committee and Rapporteur Biographies

Amy Braverman (Chair) is a scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Dr. Braverman received a PhD degree in statistics from the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) in 1999, the M.A. degree in mathematics from UCLA in 1992, and the B.A. degree in economics from Swarthmore College in 1982. She is a MISR co-investigator responsible for Level 3 algorithm development. Her research priorities are data reduction and analysis of massive datasets, data mining, and high-dimensional data visualization. She is also the Level 3 Scientist for MISR and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). She is a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on Applied and Theoretical Statistics.


Philip E. Ardanuy is chief scientist and director for Remote Sensing Applications at Raytheon Information Solutions. Dr. Ardanuy has 31 years of professional experience participating in NOAA, NASA, NSF, and DoD environmental applications programs. He specializes in developing integrated mission concepts through government-industry-academic partnerships. Dr. Ardanuy’s research and development career extends across net-centric and system-of-systems concepts, telepresence-telescience-telerobotics, tropical meteorology, the Earth’s radiation budget and climate, satellite instrument calibration and characterization, remote sensing applications and systems engineering, scientific applications research-to-operational transition, and validation of environmental observations. Dr. Ardanuy has authored over 50 publications on environmental and weather monitoring and modeling; sustainable exploration; utilization



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Appendix C Planning Committee and Rapporteur Biographies Amy Braverman (Chair) is a scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Dr. Braverman received a PhD degree in statistics from the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) in 1999, the M.A. degree in math - ematics from UCLA in 1992, and the B.A. degree in economics from Swarthmore College in 1982. She is a MISR co-investigator responsible for Level 3 algorithm development. Her research priorities are data reduc- tion and analysis of massive datasets, data mining, and high-dimensional data visualization. She is also the Level 3 Scientist for MISR and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). She is a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on Applied and Theoretical Statistics. Philip E. Ardanuy is chief scientist and director for Remote Sensing Applications at Raytheon Information Solutions. Dr. Ardanuy has 31 years of professional experience participating in NOAA, NASA, NSF, and DoD environmental applications programs. He specializes in developing inte - grated mission concepts through government-industry-academic part- nerships. Dr. Ardanuy’s research and development career extends across net-centric and system-of-systems concepts, telepresence-telescience- telerobotics, tropical meteorology, the Earth’s radiation budget and cli - mate, satellite instrument calibration and characterization, remote sensing applications and systems engineering, scientific applications research- to-operational transition, and validation of environmental observations. Dr. Ardanuy has authored over 50 publications on environmental and weather monitoring and modeling; sustainable exploration; utilization 

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 APPENDIX C of operational environmental satellite data; environmental sensing; and applications development and refinement approaches. He participates in numerous public service activities, including serving as associate edi - tor for the International Society for Optical Engineering (SPIE) Journal of Applied Remote Sensing, chair of the AMS Committee on Satellite Meteorol- ogy and Oceanography, and organizing and science planning committees for AMS and SPIE. Dr. Ardanuy is currently a member of the NRC Com- mittee on a Strategy to Mitigate the Impact of Sensor De-scopes and De- manifests on the NPOESS and GOES-R Spacecraft. He previously served on the NRC Committee on Environmental Satellite Data Utilization and on two panels of the Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space: Panel on Earth Science Applications and Societal Objectives and Panel on Options to Ensure the Climate Record from the NPOESS and GOES-R Spacecraft. John J. Bates is Chief of the Remote Sensing Applications Division of the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Climatic Data Center. Dr. Bates received a PhD in meteorology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison on the topic of satellite remote sens- ing of air-sea heat fluxes. He joined the NOAA Environmental Research Laboratories in Boulder, CO, in 1988 and there continued his work in applying remotely sensed data to climate applications. In 2002, Dr. Bates moved to the NOAA National Climatic Data Center in Asheville, NC. Dr. Bates’s research interests are in the use of operational and research satellite data and weather radar data to study the global water cycle and studying interactions of the ocean and atmosphere. He has authored over 25 peer-reviewed journal articles on these subjects. He served on the American Meteorological Society’s (AMS) Committee on Interaction of the Sea and Atmosphere (1987-1990) and the AMS Committee on Applied Radiation (1991-1994). As a member of the National Research Council’s Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) panel (1993-1997), Dr. Bates reviewed U.S. agency participation and plans for observing the global water cycle. He has also been a contributing author and U.S. government reviewer of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change assessment reports. He currently serves on the International GEWEX Radiation Panel, whose goal is to bring together theoretical and experi- mental insights into the radiative interactions and climate feedbacks asso- ciated with cloud processes, including the effects of water vapor within the atmosphere and at the Earth’s surface. James A. Coakley, Jr. is a professor in the Department of Atmospheric Sciences, College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State University (OSU). His research concentrates on the Earth’s energy bud -

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0 APPENDIX C get and climate change, with particular interest in the role clouds play in the climate system. Prior to joining OSU, he led the National Center for Atmospheric Research’s Cloud-Climate Interaction Group and Satellite Data Analysis Group. He is a member of the NOAA Council on Long- term Climate Monitoring, NASA’s Global Aerosol Climatology Project Science Team, NASA’s PICASSO-CENA Science Team, the Science Steer- ing Committee of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography’s Center for Clouds, Chemistry and Climate, and the NASA CERES Science Team. He formerly served on the NRC Committee on Meteorological Analysis, Prediction, and Research, and currently serves on the NRC’s Climate Research Committee. Karen Kafadar is a professor in the Department of Statistics at Indi- ana University. Her research focuses on robust methods, data analysis, and characterization of uncertainty in the physical, chemical, biological, and engineering sciences. Her previous appointments include National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Hewlett-Packard, and the National Cancer Institute. Until 2008, she was a professor at the Univer- sity of Colorado-Denver, where she directed the Statistical Consulting Service, collaborated with researchers in the School of Medicine, and taught courses in applied and theoretical statistics. She is currently serv - ing as chair of the NRC’s Committee on Applied and Theoretical Statistics and as a member of the NRC’s Board on Mathematical Sciences and their Applications. She has served as Editor or Associate Editor on several editorial review boards and on the governing boards of the American Sta- tistical Association (ASA), the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, and the International Statistical Institute. Dr. Kafadar is a fellow of the ASA and has authored over 80 journal articles and book chapters. She received her B.S. in mathematics and M.S. in statistics from Stanford University in 1975 and received her PhD in statistics from Princeton University in 1979. Douglas Nychka is a senior scientist at the National Center for Atmo- spheric Research (NCAR). Before joining NCAR, he spent 14 years as a faculty member in the Statistics Department at North Carolina State University. In his current role, his primary challenge is interdisciplinary research and migrating statistical techniques to important scientific prob - lems and using these problems to motivate novel statistical research. His personal research interests include nonparametric regression, statistical computing, spatial statistics, and spatial designs. Dr. Nychka is a former member of the NRC’s Committee on Applied and Theoretical Statistics. He received his PhD from the University of Wisconsin.

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 APPENDIX C Joyce E. Penner is a professor in the Department of Atmospheric, Oce- anic, and Space Sciences, and director of the Laboratory for Atmospheric Science and Environmental Research at the University of Michigan. Dr. Penner’s research focuses on improving climate models through the addi- tion of interactive chemistry and the description of aerosols and their direct and indirect effects on the radiation balance in climate models. She is also interested in urban, regional, and global tropospheric chemistry and budgets, cloud and aerosol interactions, and cloud microphysics, climate and climate change, and model development and interpretation. Dr. Penner has been a member of numerous advisory committees related to atmospheric chemistry, global change, and Earth science. She was most recently a member of the NRC Committee on Metrics for Global Change Research. She formerly served on the NRC’s Committee on Research Priorities for Airborne Particulate Matter (1997-2004), the Committee on Geophysical and Environmental Data (1995-2000), and the Committee for Review of the Science Implementation Plan of the NASA Office of Earth Science (2000). Dr. Penner is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union and currently serves on the NRC’s Climate Research Committee. Steven Platnick is a TC4 platform scientist for the ER-2 aircraft. His research includes theoretical and experimental studies of satellite, aircraft, and ground-based cloud remote sensing. He has been involved exten- sively with remote sensing field studies, including use of the MODIS Air- borne Simulator instrument flown on the NASA ER-2. Dr. Platnick is the Deputy Project Scientist for NASA’s Aqua spacecraft and a member of the MODIS Science Team working on operational cloud optical and micro- physical products. He is also a member of the CloudSat Science Team. His collaborations with NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center began in 1993, and he is currently a member of the Climate and Radiation Branch in the Laboratory for Atmospheres. Previously, Dr. Platnick was a research associate professor in the Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology, Uni - versity of Maryland Baltimore County. He received a PhD in atmospheric sciences from the University of Arizona. Staff Martha McConnell is a program officer for the Board on Atmospheric Science and Climate (BASC) and the Polar Research Board (PRB) at the National Research Council. Prior to joining the NRC in 2008, she was a congressional fellow working for Senator Lautenberg (NJ) working on ocean and climate issues with a focus on ocean acidification legislation. Martha has also worked for the Sea Education Association, Inc., and the

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 APPENDIX C Support Office for Aerogeophysical Research (SOAR). She holds a BA in geology from Colgate University and a MS and PhD in paleocean- ography/paleoclimatology from the University of South Carolina. Her research interests include calibration of climate proxies and the applica - tion of those proxies to the sediment record in order to identify the timing and magnitude of climate variability in the past. Scott T. Weidman is the director of the National Research Council’s Board on Mathematical Sciences and Their Applications (BMSA). He joined the NRC in 1989 with the Board on Mathematical Sciences and moved to the Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology in 1992. In 1996 he estab- lished a new board to conduct annual peer reviews of the Army Research Laboratory, which conducts a broad array of science, engineering, and human factors research and analysis, and he later directed a similar board that reviews the National Institute of Standards and Technology. He has been full-time with the BMSA since June of 2004. During his NRC career, he has staffed studies on a wide variety of topics related to mathemati - cal, chemical, and materials sciences, laboratory assessment, and science and technology policy. His current focus is on building up the NRC’s capabilities and portfolio related to all areas of analysis and computa- tional science. He holds bachelor degrees in mathematics and materi- als science from Northwestern University and M.S. and PhD degrees in applied mathematics from the University of Virginia. Prior to joining the NRC, he had positions with General Electric, General Accident Insurance Company, Exxon Research and Engineering, and MRJ, Inc. Lauren Brown is a Research Associate and former Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Fellow with the Polar Research Board and the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate. She is currently com- pleting her MS Degree in marine studies with a concentration in physical ocean science and engineering at the University of Delaware. Her research involves the analysis of tidal currents, velocity structure and ocean phys- ics off the coast of northwestern Greenland to determine the influence on the larger regional dynamics. She holds a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Delaware in physics and astronomy.