APPENDIX B
Biographical Summaries of Workshop Chairs, Presenters, and Rapporteurs

Daniela G. Battisti (Ph.D., 1994) is a director of the Inward Investments Unit within the National Agency for Inward Investments and Business Development. Since 2004, when she joined the agency, she has successfully launched new projects and managed complex horizontal projects that involve different layers (central and local) of the public administration. Between 2001 and 2004 she was Coordinator of the Research and Study and member of the Board of Technical Advisors in the cabinet of the Minister for Innovation and Technologies. In 1999 she joined the Italian Presidency of the Council of Ministers. Before that she was involved in numerous R&D projects in the field of ICT. She is chair of the WPIE (Working Party on the Information Economy). She is also a member of the Global Advisory Board for the London Business School.


Christopher E.H. Corbin is currently an analyst within the European Union eContentplus funded ePSIplus Thematic Network, where he has several responsibilities, including: the thematic area of the impact of the EU Directive on public sector information with respect to financial charges made by public sector information holders, coordinating Member State national meetings, providing regular news content to the ePSIplus Web site, and maintaining the ePSIplus scorecard which ranks EU member states’ implementation of the directive.


Juan Carlos De Martin is currently serving as associate professor of information engineering at the Politecnico di Torino, Italy. Dr. De Martin's research activities are focused on multimedia processing and transmission. He spent two years (1993-1995) as visiting scholar at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and two years (1996-1998) in Dallas as a member of the technical staff at Texas Instruments as well as an adjunct professor at the University of Texas (1999). Between 1998 and 2005 he served as a principal researcher at the National Research Council (CNR) of Italy in Torino, where he led the multimedia communications research group. Dr. De Martin is also active in exploring the interaction between digital technologies and society. In this regard, in 2006 he founded the NEXA Center for Internet and Society of the Politecnico di Torino; he is also the coordinator of COMMUNIA, the European thematic network on the digital public domain funded by the European Commission (2007-2010). He is the author or co-author of more than ninety international scientific publications as well as an expert evaluator of research programs for, among others, the Italian Ministry of Industry. Dr. De Martin is a member of IEEE.


Antti Eskola is currently serving as a commercial counselor at the Innovation Department of the Finnish Ministry of Employment and the Economy. His responsibilities include information-society-related innovation policy issues, including the promotion of commercial reuse of public sector information. Mr. Eskola has been active in the OECD Working Party on the Information



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APPENDIX B Biographical Summaries of Workshop Chairs, Presenters, and Rapporteurs Daniela G. Battisti (Ph.D., 1994) is a director of the Inward Investments Unit within the National Agency for Inward Investments and Business Development. Since 2004, when she joined the agency, she has successfully launched new projects and managed complex horizontal projects that involve different layers (central and local) of the public administration. Between 2001 and 2004 she was Coordinator of the Research and Study and member of the Board of Technical Advisors in the cabinet of the Minister for Innovation and Technologies. In 1999 she joined the Italian Presidency of the Council of Ministers. Before that she was involved in numerous R&D projects in the field of ICT. She is chair of the WPIE (Working Party on the Information Economy). She is also a member of the Global Advisory Board for the London Business School. Christopher E.H. Corbin is currently an analyst within the European Union eContentplus funded ePSIplus Thematic Network, where he has several responsibilities, including: the thematic area of the impact of the EU Directive on public sector information with respect to financial charges made by public sector information holders, coordinating Member State national meetings, providing regular news content to the ePSIplus Web site, and maintaining the ePSIplus scorecard which ranks EU member states’ implementation of the directive. Juan Carlos De Martin is currently serving as associate professor of information engineering at the Politecnico di Torino, Italy. Dr. De Martin's research activities are focused on multimedia processing and transmission. He spent two years (1993-1995) as visiting scholar at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and two years (1996-1998) in Dallas as a member of the technical staff at Texas Instruments as well as an adjunct professor at the University of Texas (1999). Between 1998 and 2005 he served as a principal researcher at the National Research Council (CNR) of Italy in Torino, where he led the multimedia communications research group. Dr. De Martin is also active in exploring the interaction between digital technologies and society. In this regard, in 2006 he founded the NEXA Center for Internet and Society of the Politecnico di Torino; he is also the coordinator of COMMUNIA, the European thematic network on the digital public domain funded by the European Commission (2007-2010). He is the author or co-author of more than ninety international scientific publications as well as an expert evaluator of research programs for, among others, the Italian Ministry of Industry. Dr. De Martin is a member of IEEE. Antti Eskola is currently serving as a commercial counselor at the Innovation Department of the Finnish Ministry of Employment and the Economy. His responsibilities include information- society-related innovation policy issues, including the promotion of commercial reuse of public sector information. Mr. Eskola has been active in the OECD Working Party on the Information 87

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APPENDIXES 88 Economy drafting work on the Recommendation of the OECD Council for enhanced access and more effective use of public sector information. Martin Fornefeld is the chief executive officer of MICUS Management Consulting at its Düsseldorf, Germany, location. After his three-year assistant position at the Technical University of Clausthal with foreign studies in Berkeley, California. and Asia, he held a management position at Siemens Nixdorf Informations systeme AG. Subsequently he was director with joint proxy of an international consultancy firm for nine years and finally partner of the firm before he established MICUS Management Consulting jointly with Jutta Lautenschlager in 2000. Dr. Fornefeld is chairman of the IWG-Network, an association of companies and organizations created to increase the economic impact of the reuse of PSI in Germany. Dr. Fornefeld’s expertise lies in the areas of strategy consulting, market studies, and public-private business models/partnerships, which he developed substantially in recent years, particularly in the area of public sector information and broadband development in Europe. He earned his Ph.D. in engineering from the University of Clausthal in Germany. Antoinette Graves led the U.K. Office of Fair Trading’s market study on the Commercial Use of Public Information, which was released in December 2006. She participated in the OECD’s Working Party on the Information ecEonomy, presented to the European Commission-funded ePSIplus conferences, and continued to take an interest in public sector information until she left the OFT in December 2008 to take up a post as a senior policy advisor at the United Kingdom’s Intellectual Property Office. Javier Hernández-Ros is head of the, Access to Information Unit, DG Information Society and Media, at the European Commission. Trained as a civil engineer at the Universidad Politécnica in Madrid, he has a masters degree in business administration from the Instituto de Empresa. After seven years working for engineering companies in Spain, he joined the European Commission in 1986 and was involved in technology transfer and innovation policies, where he set up the European network of innovation relay centres and the Innovating Regions in Europe network. Since June 2002 he has been head of the Access to Information Unit (formerly, Digital Libraries and Public Sector Information). He is currently coordinating the EU Digital libraries initiative and promoting legal initiatives to support the development of the digital content industry, notably the directive for reuse of public sector information. He was also responsible for the e-Content and the Safer Internet programmes for the period 2002-2005. John Houghton is a professorial fellow at Victoria University's Centre for Strategic Economic Studies (CSES) and director of the centre's Information Technologies and the Information Economy Program. He has had a number of years experience in information technology policy, more general industry policy, and related economic research. He has published and spoken widely on information technology, industry, and science and technology policy issues. His research is at the interface of theory and practice with a strong focus on the policy application of economic and social theory and of leading-edge research in various relevant fields. Consequently, his contribution tends to be in bringing knowledge and research methods to bear on policy issues in an effort to raise the level of policy debate and improve policy outcomes. He has co-authored several chapters in the past years of the OECD publications Information Technology Outlook and Communications Outlook. He also publishes annual updates on the Australian ICT industry sponsored by the

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APPENDIXES 89 Australian Computing Society. In 1998, John was awarded a National Australia Day Council, Australia Day Medal for his contribution to industry policy development. Eivind Lorentzen works for the Department of Research and Innovation, Norwegian Ministry of Trade and Industry. Tilman Merz is a German-Canadian management consultant with Roland Berger Strategy Consultants in London. He holds an M.P.A. from the London School of Economics and Political Science and an economics degree from the University of St. Gallen, Switzerland. Prior to and during his postgraduate studies, Tilman worked for the Latin America division of the German Development Bank KfW, the Information Economy Group at the OECD (ICCP), focusing on broadband Internet and public sector information policy, as well as for the U.K. Department for International Development (DFID) on issues of legislative strengthening. Tilman’s academic interests revolve around developmental and environmental policy with special emphasis on Latin America. In consulting, Tilman focuses on infrastructure, telecoms, the public sector as well as corporate restructuring. Michael J. L. Nicholson, B.Sc. F.R.I.C.S., is chairman of the Locus Association (an association of private sector PSI reusers in the United Kingdom) and deputy chairman of the PSI Alliance (the equivalent of Locus for the EU). He is founder and chief executive officer of Intelligent Addressing Limited, the company managing the largest and probably most successful of the local government integrated address data management projects in Europe. His previous business, Property Intelligence PLC, was sold to the Costar Group of Bethesda, Maryland, in 2003. Kirsti Nilsen is an independent researcher and writer. Until her retirement she was a faculty member for a number of years in the Faculty of Information and Media Studies at the University of Western Ontario, and has also taught as an adjunct and visiting professor at other universities in North America and Scandinavia. She is particularly interested in the area of information policy, focusing on public sector information and trade policy. She is the author of The Impact of Information Policy (Ablex, 2001), and co-author of Constraining Public Libraries: The World Trade Organization’s General Agreement on Trade in Services (Scarecrow Press, 2006). A review of the literature on the economics of information prepared under contract for Statistics Canada in 2007 is the basis for the presentation included in this publication. Kirsti Nilsen has also published a book chapter on e-government and another on international trade policy, along with articles and conference proceedings both on various aspects of information policy and in her other areas of interest. She is currently convener of the International Trade Treaties Working Group of the Canadian Library Association, and a past president of the Canadian Association for Information Science. A graduate of Emerson College and Simmons College in Boston, she received her Ph.D. from the University of Toronto. Jean-Jacques Sahel is director of government and regulatory affairs for Europe at Skype. Previously Mr. Sahel was deputy director of services industries in U.K. Trade and Investment (UKTI), the British Government’s external trade promotion arm. There he led the initiative to promote overseas the United Kingdom’s strength in financial services. Before that, he held senior posts at the Department of Trade and Industry, among them head of global communications policy. Jean-Jacques served UK interests in many telecoms and IT negotiations and forums during his years in public service. These included the OECD, where he was a vice chair of the anti-spam task

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APPENDIXES 90 force and chairman of the Working Party on the Information Economy (2005-2007); the ITU; the United Nation’s World Summit on the Information Society; and the WTO. He is the current U.K. signatory of the 2006 UN ITU treaties. Raed M. Sharif is a Ph.D. candidate in information science and technology and an adjunct professor at the School of Information Studies at Syracuse University. Raed’s research focuses on access to and reuse of public sector information and its impact on scientific and socioeconomic development. He worked for over two years (2005-2007) as a research associate with the Office of International Scientific and Technical Information Programs (ISTIP) at the U.S. National Academies and with the U.S. National Committee on CODATA, where he was involved in designing, launching, and evaluating science and technology policy projects and activities. He is a member of the CODATA task group on Preservation of and Access to Scientific and Technical Data in Developing Countries and a steering committee member at the InterAcademy Panel on International Issues (IAP) Program on Digital Knowledge Resources and Infrastructure in Developing Countries. Raed is also active in promoting the involvement of young scientists in the science and technology policy-making processes. To that end he is currently chairing the Young Scientists Forum at the U.N. Global Alliance for ICT and Development (GAID) Community of Expertise on Enhancing Access to and Application of Scientific Data in Developing Countries (e-SDDC). Before starting his doctoral studies, Raed worked for five years as a business development manager at Birzeit University in Palestine. He also worked as a consultant for the UNESCO, UNDP, EU, and USAID on ICT-related projects and their impact on the Palestinian people and economy. Raed received his bachelors degree in economics and political science in 1999 and his M.B.A. in 2002 from Birzeit University in Palestine. Robbin te Velde is senior researcher at Dialogic Innovation & Interaction, a small research firm in the Netherlands. He has extensive knowledge in the field of STI policy with a strong focus on IT. He has also worked at technical universities and research consultancies where he conducted many international comparative studies on ICT-related matters on behalf of national and supranational public institutes (covering Europe, North America, Asia, and the Middle East). His background is in administrative sciences, specializing in international relations and economics, and in the philosophy of science. He has written a large number of scientific articles in a wide range of areas such as international politics, philosophy, knowledge management, business administration, technology policy, and information management. Paul F. Uhlir, J.D., is director of the Board on Research Data and Information, including the U.S. National Committee for CODATA, at the U.S. National Academies in Washington, D.C. His area of emphasis is issues at the interface of science, technology, and law, with a primary focus on digital information policy and management. Prior to that, he worked in the following capacities at the National Academies: director of the Office of International Scientific and Technical Information Programs, 1999-2008; associate executive director of the Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications, 1991-1999; and senior staff officer at the Space Studies Board, 1985-1991, where he managed projects on solar system exploration and environmental remote sensing programs for NASA. Before joining the National Academies, he worked on remote sensing law and intergovernmental cooperation in meteorological satellite programs at the general counsel’s office of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in the Department of Commerce. He has published and lectured widely and has been involved in numerous consulting

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APPENDIXES 91 and pro bono activities. He holds a B.A in history from the University of Oregon and a J.D. and M.A. in international relations from the University of San Diego. Graham Vickery is head of the Information Economy Group in the Information, Computer and Communications Policy Division of OECD in Paris. As head of the Information Economy Group and programme director for OECD information technology, he oversees digital content and industry programmes covering e-business, information economy, intangibles and intellectual capital, new technologies, industrial performance, manufacturing flexibility, work organization, and industry globalization. He is the author of numerous OECD publications and articles and has presented papers at many international conferences on the information economy, technology strategies, sector developments, and government policies. Rodney Weiher is the chief economist of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in Washington, D.C., where he develops and leads a series of peer-reviewed studies and analyses of the economic dimensions of NOAA’s programs, products, and services. These studies include cost-benefit analyses of major earth observing systems, quantitative estimates of the economic benefits of weather, climate, ocean and other forecasts, and valuation of non-market environmental assets. He also advises senior NOAA management on economic issues of relevance to the agency and serves on various interagency and international economic forums. Weiher previously served as a career senior executive to the White House’s Office of Management and Budget in the areas of energy, environment, and natural resources, as well as serving in senior positions dealing with energy issues in the private sector. He holds a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Virginia. In the fall of 2008 he retired from federal service and now consults on a variety of economic issues. Nancy E. Weiss serves as general counsel of the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), a U.S. government agency that advances museum, library, and information services, and provides financial assistance to the nation’s 122,000 libraries and 17,500 museums. In this capacity she provides expert advice on the legal aspects of cultural activity and information policy-making, public/private partnerships, and federal financial assistance, and helps ensure that key policy documents recognize the important role that libraries and museums play in economic development, the creation, dissemination, and preservation of knowledge, and the design and management of the technological infrastructure for the 21st century. Prior to joining IMLS, Nancy served as deputy general counsel of the National Endowment for the Humanities, where she also provided counsel to the U.S. Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Program and represented the agency on the National Archives and Records Administration Trust Fund Board. Nancy earlier practiced litigation and media law at Williams and Connolly in Washington D.C., held a legal research fellowship in New Delhi, India, and completed a federal judicial clerkship with the Hon. William W. Schwarzer (N.D. California and director of the Federal Judicial Center). Nancy graduated with honors from the University of Michigan Law School, and Phi Beta Kappa with a degree in economics from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Frederika M. Welle Donker, M.Sc., works for the OTB Research Institute for Housing, Urban and Mobility Studies, Geo Information and Land Development Section at Delft University of Technology in The Netherlands. After graduating in electronics engineering at North Sydney College of TAFE in Australia, she worked as a technical officer at the Commonwealth Scientific &

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APPENDIXES 92 Industrial Research Organisation and at the University of Sydney. She completed her M.Sc. with the Faculty of Technology, Policy & Management of Delft University of Technology in 2001. She then worked for three years as a research assistant at the Erasmus Medical Centre (Faculty of Medicine, Erasmus University) in Rotterdam. Since 2005 Frederika has been a researcher at the OTB Research Institute for Housing, Urban and Mobility Studies at Delft University of Technology. Between 2005 and 2008 she has focused on geo portals and the accessibility of geo information, including legal aspects of accessibility and economic aspects such as pricing models. In 2009 she will begin a Ph.D. study titled Impact of the European Union Framework on the Free Flow of Geo Information and Geo Services. Her other research interests are policy development with respect to the role of the public sector in the geo information market and reuse of public sector information to develop value added products and services and Web 2.0 applications in Europe, Australia, the United States, and Canada. Jim Wretham is head of information policy at the Office of Public Sector Information in the United Kingdom. He has been involved in copyright and information issues for the best part of twenty years. Initially he led a team that managed the licensing of Crown and Parliamentary copyright in Her Majesty's Stationery Office. Following the privatization of the trading functions of HMSO in 1996, he transferred to the Cabinet Office as the head of licensing. Since then his role has taken on a much wider information remit, becoming head of information policy in 2001. In that role Jim was one of the lead officials for the United Kingdom in the negotiation of the European Directive on the Re-use of Public Sector Information. He also played a leading role in the drafting of the U.K. regulations that implemented the directive. As a member of the Office of Public Sector Information, he joined the National Archives in 2006.