D
Biographical Sketches

COMMITTEE

ALAN R. NELSON, M.D. (Chair), is an internist-endocrinologist who was in private practice in Salt Lake City, Utah, until becoming chief executive officer (CEO) of the American Society of Internal Medicine (ASIM) in 1992. Following the merger of ASIM with the American College of Physicians (ACP) in 1998, Dr. Nelson headed the Washington Office of ACP-ASIM until his semiretirement in January 2000; he currently serves as special adviser to the executive vice president and CEO of the college. A member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences, he was a member of the Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences Research. He also was chair of the IOM Committee on Ethnic and Racial Disparities in Health Care and is a co-editor of the study report Unequal Treatment: Confronting Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care (2003). He has served on approximately a dozen IOM committees and review panels, including the Committee on Redesigning Health Insurance Benefits, Payment, and Performance Improvement Programs from 2004 to 2006. Dr. Nelson was a member of the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (MedPAC) from 2000 to 2006. MedPAC advises the U.S. Congress on Medicare policies concerning payment, quality, and access to care. Dr. Nelson was president of the American Medical Association in 1989–1990 after serving two years as chair of the board and was president of the World Medical Association in 1991–1992. Prior to moving to the Washington, DC, area, Dr. Nelson was clinical professor of medicine at Utah, where he received the Outstanding Clinical Faculty Award in 1989. Dr. Nelson was born in Logan, Utah, in 1933, attended Utah State University, and received his M.D. degree from Northwestern University in 1958.


SARKIS G. AMPIAN, is an industrial minerals consultant and geochemist, retired from the U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM) after nearly 40 years of service. Mr. Ampian served in the USBM Research and Commodity Groups. His work in the Commodity Group centered on monitor-



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D Biographical Sketches COMMITTEE ALAN R. NELSON, M.D. (Chair), is an internist-endocrinologist who was in private practice in Salt Lake City, Utah, until becoming chief ex- ecutive officer (CEO) of the American Society of Internal Medicine (ASIM) in 1992. Following the merger of ASIM with the American Col- lege of Physicians (ACP) in 1998, Dr. Nelson headed the Washington Office of ACP-ASIM until his semiretirement in January 2000; he cur- rently serves as special adviser to the executive vice president and CEO of the college. A member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the Na- tional Academy of Sciences, he was a member of the Roundtable on En- vironmental Health Sciences Research. He also was chair of the IOM Committee on Ethnic and Racial Disparities in Health Care and is a co- editor of the study report Unequal Treatment: Confronting Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care (2003). He has served on approxi- mately a dozen IOM committees and review panels, including the Com- mittee on Redesigning Health Insurance Benefits, Payment, and Performance Improvement Programs from 2004 to 2006. Dr. Nelson was a member of the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (MedPAC) from 2000 to 2006. MedPAC advises the U.S. Congress on Medicare policies concerning payment, quality, and access to care. Dr. Nelson was president of the American Medical Association in 1989–1990 after serv- ing two years as chair of the board and was president of the World Medi- cal Association in 1991–1992. Prior to moving to the Washington, DC, area, Dr. Nelson was clinical professor of medicine at Utah, where he received the Outstanding Clinical Faculty Award in 1989. Dr. Nelson was born in Logan, Utah, in 1933, attended Utah State University, and received his M.D. degree from Northwestern University in 1958. SARKIS G. AMPIAN, is an industrial minerals consultant and geo- chemist, retired from the U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM) after nearly 40 years of service. Mr. Ampian served in the USBM Research and Com- modity Groups. His work in the Commodity Group centered on monitor- 115

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116 REVIEW OF THE NIOSH ROADMAP ing all domestic and offshore clay, oil shale, zircon, barium and stron- tium, and drilling-mud activities. Mr. Ampian also served as a principal mineralogist in the USBM with research outreach to all federal, state, and international regulatory agencies, including publishing and lecturing on the Department of Interior’s position on asbestos, crystalline silica, and clay locatable matters. Currently, he serves as a consultant on crys- talline silica. JOHN R. BALMES, M.D., is professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, and chief of the Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine at San Francisco General Hospital. He is also professor of environmental health sciences at the University of Califor- nia, Berkeley, and director of the Northern California Center for Occupa- tional and Environmental Health. His research is in the area of occupational and environmental respiratory disease. He studies the acute effects of inhalation exposures to ambient air pollutants in his human exposure laboratory at San Francisco General Hospital and the chronic effects of such exposures in epidemiological studies with collaborators at the University of California, San Francisco, and the University of Cali- fornia, Berkeley. He is also interested in genetic determinants of re- sponses to air pollutants. For the past five years, Dr. Balmes has been leading research, funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Preven- tion (CDC), to assist in the development of a national program to link environmental hazards with health outcomes data to improve the tracking of diseases potentially related to environmental exposures. Dr. Balmes received the Environmental and Occupational Medicine Academic Award from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), 1991–1996. He was appointed the physician member of the California Air Resources Board in December 2007. Dr. Balmes received his M.D. from Mt. Sinai School of Medicine in 1976. PATRICK N. BREYSSE, Ph.D., is professor in the Department of En- vironmental Health Sciences and director of the Division of Environ- mental Health Engineering at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. He is also program director of the Industrial Hygiene Training Program and director of the Center for Childhood Asthma in the Urban Environment. His main research interest is in exposure assessment, including pollutant source characterization, expo- sure measurement and interpretation, development and use of biomarkers of exposure-dose-effect, and evaluating relationships between sources,

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117 APPENDIX D exposure, doses, and disease. Dr. Breysse co-directed a medical screen- ing program for former Department of Energy workers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and currently serves on the laboratory’s Beryllium Health and Safety Committee. He is also a former chair of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists Worldwide. Dr. Breysse received his M.H.S. in occupational safety and health and his Ph.D. in environmental health engineering from the Johns Hopkins University. ROBERT D. GIBBONS, Ph.D., is a professor of biostatistics and psy- chiatry and director of the Center for Health Statistics at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He received his doctorate in statistics and psycho- metrics from the University of Chicago in 1981. He received a Young Scientist Award from the Office of Naval Research (1981), a Career Sci- entist Award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH; 1995), and numerous other NIH grants. His research spans the areas of medical, bio- logical, and environmental statistics, with particular emphasis on statisti- cal problems in mental health, health services research, longitudinal data analysis, and environmental regulatory statistics. Dr. Gibbons is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and twice received the Youden Prize for statistical contributions to chemistry, and the Harvard Award for contributions to psychiatric epidemiology and biostatistics. Dr. Gib- bons has served on several IOM committees including the Committee on Halcion, the Committee on Organ Procurement and Transplantation, and the Committee on the Assessment of the U.S. Drug Safety System. He has authored more than 180 peer-reviewed papers and four books. His most recent work is in the general area of drug safety with particular em- phasis on understanding the relationship between central nervous system (CNS) drugs and suicide. Dr. Gibbons is a member of the Institute of Medicine. TOM K. HEI, Ph.D., is professor of environmental health sciences and deputy director of the Center for Environmental Research at the Mailman School of Public Health and professor and vice chairman of radiation oncology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University. Dr. Hei’s research focuses on environmental carcinogenesis, specifically mechanisms of chemical and radiation carcinogenesis-mutagenesis at the cellular and molecular levels. Dr. Hei’s ongoing funded research pro- grams focus on the basic cellular and molecular mechanisms of environ- mental carcinogens such as tobacco smoke, radon, asbestos fibers, and

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118 REVIEW OF THE NIOSH ROADMAP heavy metals. Immortalized human bronchial and breast epithelial cell models are used to examine the molecular mechanisms involved in the multistage nature of human cell carcinogenesis. Dr. Hei received his doc- torate in experimental pathology from Case Western Reserve University. KARIN O. HOAL, Ph.D., P.G., is director of the Advanced Mineralogy Research Center and research professor in the Department of Geology and Geological Engineering at Colorado School of Mines. Her areas of expertise are in mineral characterization, automated mineralogy, petrol- ogy, diamond geology, and geometallurgy. Dr. Hoal received a Ph.D. in geology from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst; an M.Sc. from McGill University; and a B.Sc. from St. Lawrence University. She was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Cape Town, South Africa, spe- cializing in mantle metasomatism. She is a fellow of the Society of Eco- nomic Geologists; a member of the Society for Mining, Metallurgy, and Exploration; a member of the National Association of Women Business Owners; a certified professional geologist; and a past member of Sigma Xi. She has served on several university committees, as well as the cur- rent advisory committee for the 2009 Gemological Research Conference, Gemological Institute of America and the review committee for the 2008 International Geological Congress Travel Grant Awards. She has 31 peer-reviewed publications. Dr. Hoal has 24 years’ experience in acade- mia, industry, and government and is currently spearheading the devel- opment of integrated mineral analysis using quantitative mineralogy techniques. JOE L. MAUDERLY, D.V.M., is vice president and a senior scientist of the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute in Albuquerque, New Mexico; director of the National Environmental Respiratory Center; and former director of the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute. He is a research professor in the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center. After receiving his doctorate in veterinary medicine from Kansas State University and brief periods in clinical practice and the U.S. Air Force, he specialized in research on comparative respiratory physiology, comparative pulmonary responses to inhaled toxicants, and the human health hazards of materials inhaled in the workplace and the environ- ment. During the past decade, his research has focused on disentangling the physical-chemical species causing health effects of complex mixtures of air contaminants, with emphasis on combustion emissions, and on the utility of animal studies for estimating human health hazards. He has au-

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119 APPENDIX D thored or coauthored more than 290 articles, chapters, books, and pub- lished technical reports and is on the editorial boards of Inhalation Toxi- cology and Environmental Health Perspectives. He has chaired and participated in numerous National Research Council (NRC), Environ- mental Protection Agency (EPA), and university advisory committees, including the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee. He has held of- fices in the Environmental and Occupational Health Assembly of the American Thoracic Society and the Inhalation and Respiration Section of the Society of Toxicology. GREGORY P. MEEKER, M.Sc., is a research scientist at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Denver, Colorado, and a project chief for the USGS Earth Materials and Human Health Project. His current re- search focuses on detailed studies of the mineralogy and morphology of fibrous and asbestiform amphiboles including those that triggered a ma- jor EPA Superfund action in Libby, Montana. Mr. Meeker was a princi- ple investigator in the USGS study of the dusts generated by the collapse of the World Trade Center and served as a member of the EPA World Trade Center Expert Technical Review Panel. Mr. Meeker is currently a member of the Science Advisory Panel for a study of air quality in Min- nesota’s taconite mining region being conducted by the University of Minnesota’s Natural Resources Research Institute. He also served on two EPA technical panels to develop methods for the analysis of asbestos- contaminated vermiculite attic insulation. Other recent investigations include studies of naturally occurring asbestos in California and envi- ronmental studies of sedimentary materials deposited as a result of Hur- ricane Katrina. His research interests involve the application of microscopy and microanalysis to the fields of geochemistry, mineralogy, volcanology, and environmental geology. Prior to joining the USGS in 1989, he worked for Charles Evans & Associates in Redwood City, Cali- fornia, as a senior research analyst in materials analysis. He began his career at the California Institute of Technology in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, where he studied meteorites and lunar ma- terials with the electron microscope, electron microprobe, and ion micro- probe. Mr. Meeker is a past president of the Microbeam Analysis Society, and has twice been a national tour speaker for that organization. Mr. Meeker holds a master of science degree in geology from California State University, Los Angeles.

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120 REVIEW OF THE NIOSH ROADMAP ANDREA KIDD TAYLOR, Dr.P.H., is an assistant professor at the Morgan State University (MSU) School of Community Health and Pol- icy. She has more than 20 years’ experience in occupational and envi- ronmental health and safety. Before joining the MSU faculty, Dr. Taylor served a five-year term on the U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investi- gation Board (CSB), a board established under the Clean Air Act Amendment of 1990 to investigate chemical accidents at fixed facilities, an appointment that she received from President Clinton with confirma- tion by the U.S. Senate. Prior to the CSB, she worked as an industrial hygienist and occupational health policy consultant for the United Auto Workers in Detroit, Michigan. Dr. Taylor serves as a member of the Be- yond Pesticides/National Coalition Against the Misuse of Pesticides Ad- visory Board; she formerly served as a member of the U.S. Presidential Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans’ Illnesses and as a health representative on the National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH). She has authored many publications, in- cluding articles that highlight minority workers, chemical safety, and disease and injury prevention. Her research interests are occupational and environmental health and safety interventions and policies, indoor air quality in public schools, minority workers, and the prevention of envi- ronmental exposure to pests and pesticides. CONSULTANT ERNEST E. McCONNELL, D.V.M., is president of ToxPath, Inc., a consulting firm in Raleigh, NC, that specializes in experimental toxicol- ogy and pathology. Much of his research experience has dealt with the pathological effects of various types of asbestos and man-made fibers used as asbestos substitutes. Before becoming a consultant, Dr. McCon- nell was director of the Division of Toxicological Research and Testing Program, National Toxicology Program at the National Institute of Envi- ronmental Health Sciences (NIEHS). He has served two terms as a mem- ber of the NRC Committee on Toxicology and on several NRC committees, including the Subcommittee on Manufactured Vitreous Fi- bers. He received his D.V.M. from Ohio State University and his M.S. in pathology from Michigan State University. He completed his residency in comparative pathology at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Walter-Reed Army Medical Center.