Appendix B
Speaker Biographies

Tom Arnold, M.S., is Chief Executive of Concern Worldwide. Concern Worldwide is Ireland’s largest nongovernmental organization (NGO) helping with emergencies, long-term development, and advocacy, and it is active in 30 countries, mainly in Africa and Asia. Prior to working with Concern Worldwide, Mr. Arnold was Assistant Secretary General and Chief Economist in the Irish Department of Agriculture and Food. He was Chairman of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Committee of Agriculture from 1993 to 1998 and Chairman of the Working Group on Agricultural Policies and Markets from 1990 to 1993. At an earlier stage in his career, he worked with the European Commission for 10 years, 3 of which were in Africa. Mr. Arnold has been appointed to a number of international bodies in recent years. He was a member of the advisory board of the United Nations (UN)’s Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) (2006–2009), a member of the UN Millennium Project’s Hunger Task Force (2003–2005), and a member of the World Economic Forum Expert Group on poverty and hunger. He was a member of the Irish government’s Hunger Task Force (2007–2008). He is currently Chairman of the European Food Security Group, a network of 40 European NGOs working to enhance food security in developing countries. Mr. Arnold is a member of the Advisory Board for the International Food Policy Research Institute’s (IFPRI’s) 20/20 Initiative, which seeks to develop and promote a shared vision and consensus for action for assuring sustainable food and nutrition security for all by 2020. He is currently a member of the Irish government’s Commission on Taxation and a governor of the Irish Times, Ireland’s leading newspaper. Mr. Arnold is a graduate in agricultural economics from University College Dublin and has master’s degrees from the Catholic University of Louvain and Trinity College Dublin.



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Appendix B Speaker Biographies Tom Arnold, M.S., is Chief Executive of Concern Worldwide. Concern World- wide is Ireland’s largest nongovernmental organization (NGO) helping with emergencies, long-term development, and advocacy, and it is active in 30 coun- tries, mainly in Africa and Asia. Prior to working with Concern Worldwide, Mr. Arnold was Assistant Secretary General and Chief Economist in the Irish Department of Agriculture and Food. He was Chairman of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Committee of Agriculture from 1993 to 1998 and Chairman of the Working Group on Agricultural Policies and Markets from 1990 to 1993. At an earlier stage in his career, he worked with the European Commission for 10 years, 3 of which were in Africa. Mr. Arnold has been appointed to a number of international bodies in recent years. He was a member of the advisory board of the United Nations (UN)’s Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) (2006–2009), a member of the UN Millennium Project’s Hunger Task Force (2003–2005), and a member of the World Economic Forum Expert Group on poverty and hunger. He was a member of the Irish government’s Hunger Task Force (2007–2008). He is currently Chairman of the European Food Security Group, a network of 40 European NGOs working to enhance food security in developing countries. Mr. Arnold is a member of the Advisory Board for the International Food Policy Research Institute’s (IFPRI’s) 20/20 Initiative, which seeks to develop and promote a shared vision and consensus for action for assuring sustainable food and nutrition security for all by 2020. He is currently a member of the Irish government’s Commission on Taxation and a governor of the Irish Times, Ireland’s leading newspaper. Mr. Arnold is a graduate in agricultural economics from University College Dublin and has master’s degrees from the Catholic University of Louvain and Trinity College Dublin. 

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 IMPACTS OF THE GLOBAL FOOD PRICE CRISIS Catherine Bertini, B.A., served as Executive Director of the UN World Food Programme from 1992 to 2002, turning the organization into the world’s largest humanitarian aid agency, and was the UN Under-Secretary General for Manage - ment from 2003 to 2005. Ms. Bertini’s responsibilities as the Under-Secretary General included controlling the United Nation’s $3 billion biennial budget as well as human resources and security for 9,000 staff members. For her innova- tive leadership in assisting hundreds of millions of victims of war and natural disaster throughout the world, Ms. Bertini received the 2003 World Food Prize. She has also been honored by the Republic of Italy with its Order of Merit and by the Association of African Journalists with its Prize of Excellence. In 1996, The Times of London named her one of “The World’s Most Powerful Women.” Martin Bloem, M.D., Ph.D., is Chief for Nutrition and HIV/AIDS Policy, UN World Food Programme, in Rome, Italy. He holds a medical degree from the University of Utrecht and a doctorate from the University of Maastricht, and he has joint faculty appointments at both Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Tufts University Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. Dr. Bloem has had more than two decades of experience in nutrition research and policy. He was a Medical Officer at the Ministry of Defense in The Hague, the Netherlands, and at CIVO-TNO Toxicology & Nutrition Institute, TNO in Zeist, the Netherlands. He was a scientific consultant at the Nutrition Supplement Cooperation Project in Thailand. He has served as Country Director of Helen Keller International (HKI) Bangladesh and HKI Indonesia; as Regional Director for HKI Asia Pacific; and as Senior Vice President and Chief Medical Officer of HKI Singapore. Francesco Branca, M.D., Ph.D., is Director of the Department of Nutrition for Health and Development at the World Health Organization (WHO). He has been Regional Advisor on Nutrition and Food Security at the WHO Regional Office for Europe, dealing with the design and implementation of nutrition policy and nutrition surveillance. He has been a senior scientist at the Italian Food and Nutrition Research Institute in Italy, dealing with nutrition surveillance; with the design, management and evaluation of public health nutrition programs in Africa and Central Asia; and the implementation of research on the biological effects of micronutrients and bioactive compounds in food. He has been a member of the European Food Safety Authority Panel on Nutrition, the President of the Federa - tion of the European Nutrition Societies, and has taught public health nutrition at the University of Rome. Dr. Branca has been working extensively in primary health care in the Horn of Africa. Paul Dorosh, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., is Senior Research Fellow with the Interna- tional Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) and Program Leader of the Ethiopia Strategy Support Program in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Before moving to Ethiopia,

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 APPENDIX B he worked 6 years as a Senior Economist with The World Bank, in the Spatial and Local Development Team and in the South Asia Agricultural and Rural Develop - ment Unit. He earlier worked for 6 years as a Senior Research Fellow with the International Food Policy Research Institute, including 4 years in Dhaka, Ban - gladesh, where he was an Advisor to the Ministry of Food. From 1989 to 1997, Dorosh was a Senior Research Associate and Associate Professor with Cornell University where he worked on the effects of structural adjustment policies and poverty in Madagascar, Niger, and other countries of sub-Saharan Africa. He holds a B.A. in applied mathematics from Harvard University and a Ph.D. in applied economics from the Food Research Institute of Stanford University. Nina V. Fedoroff, Ph.D., is Science and Technology Adviser to the Secretary of State and to the Administrator of the U.S. Agency for International Develop- ment (USAID). Dr. Fedoroff is on leave from the Pennsylvania State University, where she is the Willaman Professor of Life Sciences and the Evan Pugh Pro - fessor in the Biology Department and the Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences. Dr. Fedoroff is a leading geneticist and molecular biologist who has contributed to the development of modern techniques used to study and modify plants. She received her Ph.D. in molecular biology from the Rockefeller University in 1972. In 1978, she became a staff member at the Carnegie Institution of Washington and a faculty member in the Biology Department at Johns Hopkins University. In 1995, Dr. Fedoroff joined the faculty of the Pennsylvania State University, where she served as the founding director of the Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences. Dr. Fedoroff has done fundamental research in the molecular biology of plant genes and transposons, as well on the mechanisms plants use to adapt to stressful environments. Her book, Mendel in the Kitchen: A Scientist’s View of Genetically Modified Foods, published in 2004 by the Joseph Henry Press of the National Academy of Sciences, examines the scientific and societal issues surrounding the introduction of genetically modified crops. Dr. Fedoroff is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the European Academy of Sciences. She has served on the National Science Board of the National Science Foundation, and she is a 2006 National Medal of Science laureate. Harvey V. Fineberg, M.D., Ph.D., is the President of the Institute of Medicine. He served as Provost of Harvard University from 1997 to 2001, following 13 years as Dean of the Harvard School of Public Health. He has devoted most of his academic career to the fields of health policy and medical decision making. His past research has focused on the process of policy development and imple - mentation, assessment of medical technology, evaluation and use of vaccines, and dissemination of medical innovations. Dr. Fineberg helped found and served as president of the Society for Medical Decision Making and also served as consul - tant to the World Health Organization. At the Institute of Medicine, he has chaired

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 IMPACTS OF THE GLOBAL FOOD PRICE CRISIS and served on a number of panels dealing with health policy issues, ranging from AIDS to new medical technology. He also served as a member of the Public Health Council of Massachusetts (1976–1979), as chairman of the Health Care Technology Study Section of the National Center for Health Services Research (1982–1985), and as president of the Association of Schools of Public Health (1995–1996). Dr. Fineberg is coauthor of the books Clinical Decision Analysis, Innoators in Physician Education, and The Epidemic That Neer Was, an analy- sis of the controversial federal immunization program against swine flu in 1976. He has coedited several books on such diverse topics as AIDS prevention, vaccine safety, and understanding risk in society. He has also authored numerous articles published in professional journals. Dr. Fineberg is the recipient of several honor- ary degrees and the Joseph W. Mountin Prize from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). He earned his bachelor’s and doctoral degrees from Harvard University. Hafez Ghanem, M.A., Ph.D., was appointed Assistant Director-General, Eco- nomic and Social Development Department in November 2007. Mr. Ghanem holds a B.A. and an M.A. in economics (economic development and international trade) from the American University in Cairo, Egypt, and a Ph.D. in economics (trade, econometrics) from the University of California, Davis. Mr. Ghanem began his professional career with the World Bank in Washington, DC, in 1983. Between 1995 and 1997, he served as Principal Economist for Armenia, Georgia, Moldova, and Ukraine. From 1997 to 2000, he worked successively as Sector Leader, Public Economics and Trade Policy for Europe and Central Asia Region. Subsequently, he was appointed as the World Bank’s Country Director in Madagascar, Comoros, Mauritius, and Seychelles. Since 2004, he served as Country Director in Nigeria. Daniel Glickman, B.A., J.D., is chairman and CEO of the Motion Picture Association of America, Inc., (MPAA), which serves as the voice and advocate of the American motion picture, home video, and television industries. Its mem- bers include Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures, Paramount Pictures, Sony Pictures Entertainment, Twentieth Century Fox Film Corp., and NBC Universal and Warner Bros. Entertainment. Prior to joining the MPAA, Mr. Glickman was the director of the Institute of Politics at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government (2002–2004). He also served as Senior Advisor to the law firm of Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld in Washington, DC. Mr. Glickman served as U.S. Secretary of Agriculture from March 1995 until January 2001. Under his leadership, the department administered farm and conservation pro - grams; modernized food-safety regulations; forged international trade agreements to expand U.S. markets; and improved its commitment to fairness and equality in civil rights. Before his appointment as Secretary of Agriculture, Mr. Glickman served for 18 years in the U.S. House of Representatives, representing the 4th

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 APPENDIX B Congressional District of Kansas. During that time, he was a member of the House Agriculture Committee, including 6 years as chairman of the subcommit - tee with jurisdiction over federal farm policy issues. Moreover, he was an active member of the House Judiciary Committee, Chairman of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, and a leading congressional expert on general aviation policy. Before his election to Congress in 1976, Glickman served as president of the Wichita, Kansas, school board; was a partner in the law firm of Sargent, Klenda and Glickman; and worked as a trial attorney at the U.S. Securi - ties and Exchange Commission. He received his B.A. in history from the Uni - versity of Michigan and his J.D. from The George Washington University. He is a member of the Kansas and the District of Columbia bars. Mr. Glickman serves on the board of directors of the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, Hain-Celestial Corp., Communities in Schools, Food Research and Action Center (FRAC), the National 4-H Council, the William Davidson Institute, and the Center for U.S. Global Engagement. He is also a member of the Genocide Prevention Task Force, chaired by former Secretaries Madeleine Albright and Bill Cohen; the Council on Foreign Relations; and the Kansas Bioscience Authority. In addition, Mr. Glickman serves as the Chicago Council on Global Affairs Cochair of the Global Agriculture Development Project (with Catherine Bertini). He is a former member of the international advisory board of the Coca-Cola Co. He has been a Senior Fellow and part-time instructor in the public policy departments at Georgetown University and Wichita State University and is a lecturer on public policy at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government. Hans R. Herren, Ph.D. (Planning Committee Member), has been the President of Millennium Institute since May 2005. Prior to joining Millennium Institute, he was Director-General of the International Center for Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE) in Nairobi, Kenya. He also served as Director of the Africa Biological Control Center of the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA) in Benin. At ICIPE, Dr. Herren developed and implemented programs in the area of human, animal, plant, and environmental health (the 4-H paradigm) as they relate to insect issues. At IITA, he conceived and implemented the highly successful biological control program that saved the African cassava crop, avert- ing Africa’s worst-ever food crisis. He serves on the boards of numerous orga- nizations, including as Cochair of the International Assessment of Agricultural Knowledge, Science, and Technology; Chairman of BioVision, a Swiss founda - tion with a global mandate to alleviate poverty and improve the livelihoods of poor people while maintaining the precious natural resource base that sustains life; President of the International Association of the Plant Protection Sciences; and former member of the National Research Council Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources. Dr. Herren earned his Ph.D. at the Federal Institute of Tech- nology in Zurich, Switzerland, and holds numerous awards that recognize his distinguished and continuing achievements in original research.

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0 IMPACTS OF THE GLOBAL FOOD PRICE CRISIS Christopher Hillbruner, M.S., received a master’s degree in food policy from the Tufts University Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy in 2007. He now works at Chemonics as a Food Security Warning Specialist for USAID’s Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET). FEWS NET collabo- rates with international, regional, and national partners to provide timely and rigorous early warning and vulnerability information on emerging and evolving food security issues. FEWS NET professionals in Africa, Central America, Haiti, Afghanistan, and the United States monitor and analyze relevant data and infor- mation in terms of its impacts on livelihoods and markets to identify potential threats to food security. Once these issues are identified, FEWS NET uses a suite of communications and decision support products to help decision makers act to mitigate food insecurity. Josephine Iziku Ippe, M.Sc., has 15 years of experience in nutrition and related M.Sc., programs in Africa, mostly in east and central Africa. She is currently the Nutri - tion Manager in the UNICEF Bangladesh Country Office, based in Dhaka. Before joining UNICEF, she worked for 5 years with Oxfam GB in Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Congo, Nicaragua, and South Sudan. During her fifth year with Oxfam GB, she also provided technical support to countries mainly within the Horn and east and central African regions. She was a Nutrition Programme Manager for SCF-UK in Darfur, Sudan, and later she was a Nutrition Coordinator for Action African in Need (AAIN) in the Southern Sudanese Refugees Camp, Ikafe, and North Uganda. She was an Assistant Project Officer of Nutrition for UNICEF/ Operation Life Line (OLS). She managed the emergency nutrition program in the Malawi Country Office as a Nutrition Project Officer, and then became the Chief of the Nutrition Section for UNICEF, North Sudan, responsible for emergency and development nutrition projects and sector coordination. She has a B.Sc. in family sciences from the Ahfad University for Women in Omdurman, Sudan, and an M.Sc. in human nutrition from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, University of London. Isatou Jallow, M.Sc. (Planning Committee Member), is a nutritionist and gen- der advocate with 22 years of field and policy experience at both the country and international level. She currently serves as the Chief of Women, Children, and Gender Policy of the UN World Food Programme based in Rome. Some of her achievements include the transformation of the Ministry of Health Nutrition Unit of The Gambia to a National Nutrition Agency under the Office of the Vice President, with a mandate to coordinate nutrition across the various sectors. She also adapted the global UNICEF/WHO Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative to a community initiative (Baby Friendly Community Initiative) incorporating maternal and infant nutrition, environmental sanitation, and personal hygiene into 10 steps for communities to implement. The initiative was initially piloted in 12 communities in The Gambia and gradually scaled up to almost 300 communi -

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 APPENDIX B ties. Ms. Jallow is currently Cochair of the UN Standing Committee on Nutrition (SCN) working group on Breastfeeding and Complementary Feeding. She is also an advisory committee member of the IFPRI-coordinated “Millions Fed” project. She was selected as the second Abraham Horwitz lecturer for the UN SCN 28th session in 1998. In May 2009, she was awarded the Medal of National Order of The Republic of The Gambia for her achievements in nutrition. Ms. Jallow holds a M.Sc. in nutrition from the University of Oslo, Norway. Jackie Judd is Vice President and Senior Advisor for Communications at the Kaiser Family Foundation. She joined the foundation in 2003 as a Senior Visit - ing Fellow. Ms. Judd’s current responsibilities include managing and developing multimedia projects for the foundation’s events and websites, involvement in the foundation’s international partnerships related to the coverage of HIV/AIDS and managing the Technology Working Group. Ms. Judd is a former long-time broad- cast journalist covering a range of issues including politics, health care policy, and Congress. She was with ABC News for 16 years as a correspondent for World News Tonight with Peter Jennings, Nightline, and Good Morning America. At National Public Radio, she was a news anchor and cohost on Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Ms. Judd is also a former CBS News radio correspondent. Her honors include National Emmy awards, an Edward R. Murrow Award, the Joan Barone Award, the David Bloom award, a duPont Award, a commendation from Women in Radio and Television for a series on women’s health issues, and an Overseas Press Club Citation of Excellence. She received a bachelor’s degree from American University (AU) in 1974. Ms. Judd serves on the Dean’s Advisory Committee at AU’s School of Communications, and she is a member of the board of directors of Rebuilding Together of Washington, DC. Asma Lateef, B.A., M.A., is Director of Bread for the World Institute. An affili- ate of Bread for the World, a nonpartisan, Christian antihunger organization, the institute publishes its annual Hunger Report, as well as briefing papers and educational materials on issues related to domestic and international hunger and poverty. She has also worked as a consultant at the UN Conference on Trade and Development and the International Labour Organization. She holds a bachelor’s degree from McGill University in Montreal, Canada, a postgraduate diploma from the London School of Economics, and a master’s degree in economics from the University of Maryland. Ruth Levine, Ph.D., is Vice President for Programs and Operations and Senior Fellow at the Center for Global Development (CGD), where she leads the center’s work on global health policy. Dr. Levine has a doctorate in economic demography from Johns Hopkins University. She is a health economist with more than 15 years of experience designing and assessing the effects of social sector programs in Latin America, eastern Africa, the Middle East, and South Asia. Before joining

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 IMPACTS OF THE GLOBAL FOOD PRICE CRISIS the CGD, Dr. Levine designed, supervised, and evaluated loans at the World Bank and the Inter-American Development Bank. Between 1997 and 1999, she served as the advisor on the social sectors in the office of the executive vice president of the Inter-American Development Bank. She has co-authored The Health of Women in Latin America and the Caribbean (The World Bank, 2001), Millions Saed: Proen Successes in Global Health (CGD, 2004, updated as Cases in Global Health: Millions Saed [Jones and Bartlett, 2007]), and Performance Incenties for Global Health: Potential and Pitfalls (CGD, 2009). Reynaldo Martorell, Ph.D. (Planning Committee Chair), is the Robert W. Woodruff Professor of Public Health in the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University, where he also served as Chair of the Department of Global Health. Previously, he was a Professor in the Division of Nutritional Sciences at Cornell University and at the Food Research Institute at Stanford University. Dr. Martorell’s research interests include maternal and child nutrition (particularly in developing countries), child growth and development, the significance of early childhood malnutrition for short- and long-term human function, micronutrient malnutrition, and the emergence of obesity and chronic diseases in developing countries. Dr. Martorell’s policy interests include global health concerns, par- ticularly programs and policies in food and nutrition, issues dealing with hunger and malnutrition, and the health implications of changes in diet and lifestyles in developing countries (including the emergence of obesity and related chronic diseases of dietary origin in developing countries). He was active at the National Research Council during the 1980s, serving on the Food and Nutrition Board, its Committee on International Nutrition Programs, and the Subcommittee on Vitamin A Deficiency Prevention and Control. More recently he chaired the IOM Planning Committee for the Joint U.S.–Mexico Workshop on Preventing Obesity of Children and Youth of Mexican Origin. Dr. Martorell is a consultant to The World Bank, UNICEF, and WHO; past President of the Society for International Nutrition Research; and past Associate Editor of the Journal of Nutrition. Dr. Martorell received a bachelor’s degree in anthropology from St. Louis Univer- sity and a Ph.D. in biological anthropology from the University of Washington. He was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 2002 and currently serves on the Committee on Childhood Obesity Prevention and as a member of the Food and Nutrition Board. John Mason, Ph.D., is a Professor in the Department of International Health and Development at Tulane University. He works to improve nutrition, particularly of children and women, in developing countries. Starting in nutritional biochemis - try, Dr. Mason moved on to research child health and nutrition in east and west Africa, before joining the Food and Agricultural Organization where he worked on nutritional surveillance and program planning. He then became Director of the Cornell Nutritional Surveillance Program, conducting research and training

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 APPENDIX B both in Cornell and overseas; at the same time he codirected a joint program with UNICEF to promote nutrition in eastern and southern Africa. Returning to the UN in 1986, Dr. Mason was Technical Secretary of the UN Coordinating Com- mittee on Nutrition (ACC/SCN) based in WHO, where he started the series of UN reports on the world nutrition situation, the Refugee Nutrition Information System, and supervised 15 UN publications on nutrition policy issues. He joined Tulane University in 1996. His interests are currently focused on nutrition policy development; on approaches to sustaining community-based programs for nutri- tion improvement; and micronutrient deficiencies, in terms of epidemiology and prevention. Currently he is acting as an advisor to The World Bank and UNICEF for the National Nutrition Program in Ethiopia; to the UN-SCN in reporting on the world nutrition situation; and to WHO as a member of the Expert Reference Group for the Health and Nutrition Tracking System, and for a landscaping exercise to identify priorities for nutrition interventions. Dr. Mason received his bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees from University of Cambridge. Ellen Mathys, M.P.H., is the Senior Food Security Early Warning and Response Specialist with the USAID-funded Food and Nutrition Technical Assistance Proj- ect II (FANTA-2). She has 13 years of experience working in 19 low-income countries in the areas of nutrition and food security. From 2004 to 2006 she served as the Livelihoods Advisor with the USAID-funded Famine Early Warn- ing Systems Network (FEWS NET) in Washington, DC. Recently she assisted FANTA and Office of Food for Peace (FFP) with developing guidance on early warning and response, including trigger indicators and guidance on food assis - tance programming in urban emergencies for the private voluntary organizations (PVO) community. She has developed global tools and best practice guidance for the UN and the Global Nutrition Cluster related to international nutrition and food security assessment in emergencies as well as integrating food/nutrition and HIV programs in crisis and refugee settings. She has an M.P.H. from Tulane University, with a focus on international nutrition and food security and complex emergencies and disaster management. James McGovern, B.A., M.P.A., is currently serving his seventh term in Con- gress, and he was first sworn in as U.S. Representative for Massachusetts’ 3rd Congressional District in January 1997. Representative McGovern is Vice Chair- man of the House Rules Committee, which sets the terms for debate and amend - ments on most legislation, and he is a member of the House Budget Committee. Representative McGovern is also Cochair of both the Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission and the House Hunger Caucus. Before his election to Congress, Representative McGovern spent 14 years working as a senior aide for the late U.S. Representative John Joseph Moakley (D-South Boston), former dean of the Massachusetts delegation and Chairman of the House Rules Committee. During those years, Representative McGovern earned a strong reputation as a champion

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 IMPACTS OF THE GLOBAL FOOD PRICE CRISIS of human rights. In 1989, Representative McGovern was chosen by Congress- man Moakley to lead a congressional investigation into the murders of six Jesuit priests and two lay women in El Salvador. In Congress, Representative McGovern has championed several education initiatives, including a bill to increase grant assistance for college students and their families. He has led the fight to provide adequate health care, including home health care, and he has worked to increase funding for the Land and Water Conservation Fund. He has fought to preserve and strengthen Social Security, and he has secured millions of dollars in federal assistance to central and southeastern Massachusetts. Representative McGovern earned his bachelor of arts (1981) and master’s of public administration (1984) degrees from the American University, working his way through college by serv - ing as an aide in the office of U.S. Senator George McGovern (D-SD). He went on to manage Senator McGovern’s 1984 presidential campaign in Massachusetts, and he delivered his nomination speech during the 1984 Democratic National Convention in San Francisco. Fangquan Mei, M.S., Ph.D., is the Standing Vice President of the State Food and Nutrition Consultant Committee of the State Council of China. He is also Presi - dent of the Chinese Association for Agricultural Modernization and the Honorary Director-General of the Agricultural Information Institute, CAAS. He is engaged in research for food and agriculture development strategies, consumption and production structures, and information management. At present, Professor Mei is in charge of key projects on food security and early warning systems in China and the development of an agricultural research information system (ARIS) in China. He is the former President of the Asian Federation for Information Technology in Agriculture. He won the first and second National Science and Technology Progress Award three times, has published 117 papers, is in charge of writing and compiling 13 copies of monographic works, and trained 76 postgraduates (Ph.D. and M.S.). Recently, he was invited to visit 20 countries and present at 68 international academic conferences, including the International Conference on Nutrition (ICN), the FAO 50th Anniversary, the World Fertilizer Conference, the World Food Production Conference, and the Asia Conference on Agricultural Information Technology. David Nabarro, M.D., serves as an Assistant Secretary General in the United Nations. He holds the position of Senior UN System Coordinator for Avian and Human Influenza, reporting to the UN Deputy Secretary-General, on secondment from the World Health Organization (WHO) since September 2005. In April 2008 he was given an additional responsibility as Deputy UN System Coordinator by the UN Secretary-General, and he has been Coordinator for the Global Food Security Crisis as of January 2009. A physician and public health specialist, Dr. as Nabarro has worked in the UK National Health Service, taught at the London and Liverpool Schools of Tropical Medicine, worked in child health programs in

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 APPENDIX B Nepal, served as regional manager for the UK Save the Children Fund in South Asia, and in 1989 served as health and population adviser to the British Overseas Development Administration (ODA) in Nairobi, Kenya. In 1990 Dr. Nabarro moved to London as ODA’s Chief Health and Population Adviser and was pro- moted to the position of Director for Human Development in the Department for International development in 1997. In 1999, he joined WHO to manage the Roll Back Malaria project; in 2000 he became Executive Director in the Office of the Director-General. He transferred to WHO’s Sustainable Development and Healthy Environments cluster in 2003. He was then appointed Representative of the Director General for Health Action in Crises, coordinating support for health assessments and aspects of crises preparedness, response, and recovery opera- tions in a variety of locations including Darfur, Liberia, and countries affected by the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami. Ruth K. Oniang’o, Ph.D. (Planning Committee Member), is the Executive Director of the Rural Outreach Program and has been elected a member of Par- liament of the Government of Kenya. Dr. Oniang’o has done much consultation work, such as with the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) in nutrition. Her areas of research and consultation are household food and nutritional security, women’s nutrition, child health, and community-level agro-processing, in which she has published widely. Dr. Oniang’o has been awarded the Silver Star Medal by the President of the Republic of Kenya for outstanding service to the country in community development through action research in 1995 and the Distinguished Service Medal for national service in 1998. She has served on the board of the Kenya Bureau of Standards, Egerton University Council, and Poverty Eradica- tion Commission. She is the founder and editor-in-chief of the African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition, and Deelopment. She is on the board of the Kenya Gatsby Charitable Trust, Food Security and Sustainable Development Division of the Economic Commission for Africa, Institute for Policy Analysis and Research, International Fertilizer Development Center, Biotechnology Advi - sory Council of Monsanto-USA, and the Private Sector Corporate Governance Trust. She is also on the advisory committee of the Biofortification Project of the International Food Policy Research Institute. She is a member of the working group forming the Society of African Journal Editors, a panel member of the World Cancer Research Fund International, and Founder-President of the Kenya Union of Food Science and Technology. Dr. Oniang’o received her B.S. (with distinction) and M.S. degrees from Washington State University in the United States and her Ph.D. from the University of Nairobi, Kenya, and she has since spent 20 years in academia. Per Pinstrup-Andersen, Ph.D. (Planning Committee Member), is the H. E. Babcock Professor of Food and Nutrition Policy at Cornell University and Profes- sor of Development Economics at Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University in

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 IMPACTS OF THE GLOBAL FOOD PRICE CRISIS Denmark. Before assuming his current positions, Dr. Pinstrup-Andersen was the Director General of the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) from 1992 to 2002. He had previously been Director of the Cornell Food and Nutrition Policy Program, Professor of Food Economics at Cornell University, member of the Technical Advisory Committee of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research, Research Fellow and Director of the Food Consumption and Nutrition Policy Program at IFPRI, Agricultural Economist at the Interna - tional Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Director of the Agro-Economic Division at the International Fertilizer Development Center, and an Associate Professor of the Danish Veterinary and Agricultural University in Copenhagen. He is currently a member of the NRC Roundtable on Science and Technology for Sustainability and has served on other IOM or NRC committees, including the Committee on Agricultural Biotechnology, Health, and the Environment; Com - mittee on International Nutrition Programs; and the Food and Nutrition Board. He holds a B.S. in agricultural economics from the Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University in Denmark and an M.S. and Ph.D. from Oklahoma State University. Dr. Pinstrup-Andersen is the recipient of the 2001 World Food Prize. Ellen G. Piwoz, Sc.D., M.H.S., is a Senior Program Officer in the Global Health Program of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, responsible for nutrition in the Integrated Health Solutions Development division. Prior to joining the Gates Foundation in 2007, Dr. Piwoz was the Director of the Center for Nutrition at the Academy for Educational Development in Washington, DC. During her 12 years at the academy, she directed the Sustainable Approaches to Nutrition in Africa Project, and she was a senior nutrition advisor to USAID’s Africa Bureau Office of Sustainable Development. Dr. Piwoz held adjunct appointments at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health and at the University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health where she was an investigator in several studies examining ways to prevent HIV transmission dur- ing breast-feeding. She was an elected councilor of the Society for International Nutrition Research, American Society of Nutrition from 2002 to 2006. Juan A. Rivera, Ph.D. (Planning Committee Member), is the Founding Direc- tor of the Center for Research in Nutrition and Health at the National Institute of Public Health and is a Professor of Nutrition in the School of Public Health in Mexico. He is also an Adjunct Professor in the Division of Nutritional Sciences at Cornell University and at the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory Uni- versity. Dr. Rivera’s research interests include the epidemiology of stunting, the short- and long-term effects of undernutrition during early childhood, the effects of zinc and other micronutrient deficiencies on growth and health, the study of malnutrition in Mexico, and the design and evaluation of programs to improve nutritional status of children. Dr. Rivera is a former Director of Nutrition and

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 APPENDIX B Health at the Nutrition Institute of Central America and Panama. He is Cochair of the International Zinc Nutrition Consultative Group. Since 2000, he has been a member of the panel of experts of the World Cancer Research Fund and has been appointed to the National Academy of Medicine and to the Mexican Academy of Sciences in Mexico. He was a member of the board of the International Union of Nutritional Scientists from 2001 to 2005 and of the Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition Board until 2005. He is Chair of the International Nutrition Council of the American Society for Nutrition. Dr. Rivera has published more than 130 scientific articles, book chapters, and books, and he is currently a member of the Latin American Nutrition Society, the American Society for Nutritional Sciences, and the Society for International Nutrition Research. He served on the IOM Plan- ning Committee for the Joint U.S.–Mexico Workshop on Preventing Obesity of Children and Youth of Mexican Origin. Dr. Rivera earned both his master’s and doctorate degrees from Cornell University in international nutrition with minors in epidemiology and statistics. Marie T. Ruel, Ph.D., is Director of the Poverty, Health, and Nutrition Division at the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). From 1996 until her current appointment, Dr. Ruel served as Senior Research Fellow and Research Fellow in that division. Since joining IFPRI, she led the Multi-Country Program on Challenges to Urban Food and Nutrition and the Global Regional Project on Diet Quality and Diet Changes of the Poor. Prior to IFPRI, she was head of the Nutrition and Health Division at the Institute of Nutrition of Central America and Panama/Pan American Health Organization (INCAP/PAHO) in Guatemala. Dr. Ruel has worked for more than 20 years on issues related to policies and programs to alleviate poverty and child malnutrition in developing countries. She has published extensively in nutrition and epidemiology journals on topics such as maternal and child nutrition, food-based strategies to improve diet quality and micronutrient nutrition, urban livelihoods, food security and nutrition, and the development of indicators of child feeding and care practices. Dr. Ruel has served on various international expert committees, such as the National Academy of Sciences and the International Zinc in Nutrition Consultative Group. Dr. Ruel received her Ph.D. in international nutrition from Cornell University and her master’s in health sciences from Laval University in Canada. Werner Schultink, M.D., is the Chief of Child Development and Nutrition for the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF). UNICEF has worked from its founding on nutrition programming aimed at fulfilling every child’s right to adequate nutrition. UNICEF is committed to scaling up and sustaining cover- age of its current high-impact nutrition interventions in the program areas of infant and young child feeding, micronutrients, nutrition security in emergencies, and nutrition and HIV/AIDS.

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 IMPACTS OF THE GLOBAL FOOD PRICE CRISIS Rajiv J. Shah, M.D., was recently nominated by President Barack Obama as Under Secretary of Research, Education and Economics (REE) and Chief Sci- entist at the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The REE mission area provides the science that federal agencies, policy makers, researchers, and others draw on to meet challenges facing America’s food and agriculture system. The four REE agencies are the Agricultural Research Service (including the National Agri - cultural Library), Economic Research Service, National Agricultural Statistics Service, and Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service. Dr. Shah was formerly Director of the Agricultural Development Program at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The foundation’s agriculture programs represent a multibillion dollar global effort to reduce hunger and poverty. Dr. Shah joined the foundation in 2001 and served as Director of Strategic Opportunities and Deputy Director of Policy and Finance for Global Health. Before joining the foundation, Dr. Shah was a health care policy advisor on the Gore 2000 presidential campaign and a member of Governor Ed Rendell’s (D-PA) transition committee on health. He is a cofounder of Health Systems Analytics and Project IMPACT for South Asian Americans. He also served as a policy aide in the British Parliament and worked at the World Health Organization. Originally from Detroit, Michigan, Dr. Shah earned his M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania Medical School and his M.S. in health economics from the Wharton School, University of Pennsyl- vania. He is a graduate of the University of Michigan and the London School of Economics. In 2007, Dr. Shah was named a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum. Haddis Tadesse, M.P.A., currently works as Policy and External Relations Offi- cer at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. He is responsible for managing the global development external relation efforts in Africa. Prior to joining the founda- tion, Mr. Haddis served as the Senior Policy Advisor to Mayor Greg Nickels of Seattle, Washington. His responsibilities included providing policy advice to the mayor, deputy mayor, and the cabinet of Seattle City government on matters of human services, public health, housing, civil rights, and immigrant and refugee affairs. Prior to his position as Senior Policy Advisor, Mr. Tadesse devoted his work to the city of Seattle, becoming a human resource, planning, and develop- ment specialist and later the Boards and Commissions Administrator. He also worked as an accounting specialist at the University of Washington Harborview Medical Center. A graduate of the University of Phoenix and the University of Washington, he received his B.S. in business management and his master’s of public administration, respectively. Mr. Tadesse has been involved in various organizations including the United Nations Association, the Seattle Pacific Sci - ence Center, and the World Affairs Council. Anna Taylor is the Head of Hunger Reduction at Save the Children UK (SCUK) leading a team of 13 food security and nutrition specialists. She has been work-

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 APPENDIX B ing for Save the Children for the past 10 years. Previously, she served as a Nutri - tion Adviser at SCUK providing technical support to overseas programs and a lead on policy development in nutrition within the organization. She has worked, among other countries, in Bangladesh, Uganda, North Korea, and Tanzania for Save the Children and UNICEF. Her work has focused on information systems, infant and young child feeding, social protection, emergency feeding, European donor policy, and spans humanitarian and development fields. Graciela Teruel Belismelis, Ph.D., is a full-time professor at the Department of Economics of Iberoamericana University. She is Codirector of the Mexican Fam - ily Life Survey. Dr. Teruel received her Ph.D. in economics from the University of California, Los Angeles, in 1998 and her B.A. from Mexico Autonomous Technology Institute. She is an academic member of the National Committee for the Evaluation of Social Programs in Mexico. Andrew Thorne-Lyman, M.H.S., is a doctoral student in the Department of Nutrition of the Harvard School of Public Health and a freelance consultant. He worked as a nutritionist for 7 years for the UN World Food Programme (WFP) where he undertook nutritional surveys and assessments, helped strengthen sys - tems to measure the nutritional outcomes of the WFP’s programs, and worked on issues related to HIV/AIDS and nutrition. Prior to this, he worked for Helen Keller International Bangladesh on the Nutritional Surveillance Project from 1997 to 2000. He has a master’s degree in international health from the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health. Hans Timmer, a Dutch national, is Director of the World Bank’s Development Prospects Group. Under his management, the Prospects Group produces the World Bank’s annual publications, Global Economic Prospects, Global Deel- opment Finance, and Global Monitoring Report, in addition to a wide range of monitoring and forecasting publications. The Prospects Group is responsible for the global macroeconomic forecasts of the World Bank and focuses on cross- border flows to developing countries, from trade and financial flows to remit- tances and migration. With long-term scenario analysis, such structural issues as trade agreements, climate change policies, migration, global income distribution, and policies aimed at meeting the Millennium Development Goals are being analyzed. Before joining the Bank in May 2000, he was head of international economic analysis at Central Planning Bureau (CPB) for 10 years. In this role, he supervised the development of two world models: a long-term model of the world economy, and an econometric medium-term model of Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) economies. He has had vast experience working with the European Commission, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and the OECD, as well as with the Indian Planning Commission and the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. He has participated in international

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0 IMPACTS OF THE GLOBAL FOOD PRICE CRISIS modeling groups like LINK and GTAP. Mr. Timmer studied econometrics at Erasmus University, Rotterdam. He has been a researcher at the University of Lodz in Poland and at the Netherlands Economic Institute. Ricardo Uauy, M.D., Ph.D. (Planning Committee Member), is a Professor of Public Health Nutrition at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medi- cine and a Professor of Nutrition and Pediatrics at the University of Chile. He joined the Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology of the University of Chile (INTA) in 1977 as an Associate Professor, and in 1981 he became Professor of nutrition and pediatrics. He has directed INTA’s training programs, the Clinical Research Center, the Division of Human Nutrition and Medical Sciences, and was Resident Coordinator for UN University activities at INTA. He headed the area of human nutrition and medical sciences and directed the Clinical Nutrition Unit; in 1994 he became INTA’s Director, and was re-appointed in 1998. From 1985 through 1990 he was Associate Professor of Nutrition and Pediatrics at the Center for Human Nutrition, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. Dr. Uauy is board-certified (USA) in pediatrics and in neonatal-perinatal medicine. He has served as President of the Chilean Nutrition Society and has participated as an expert to WHO/FAO. He was a member of the NIH Nutri- tion Study Section and is a member of the Scientific Advisory of the Novartis Foundation. He has contributed more than 250 scientific publications on various aspects of human nutritional needs in health and disease with an emphasis on neonatal nutrition, and he has coedited three books. He is on the editorial boards of Early Human Deelopment, Nutritional Biochemistry, Journal of Pediatrics, and the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition. He was a member of the UN ACC/SCN Advisory Group in Nutrition (AGN) and chairman of the AGN for 1997–2000. He was elected as a member of the International Union of Nutritional Sciences (IUNS) council in 1997 and chosen as president-elect in 2001. He received the McCollum award presented by the American Society for Nutritional Sciences in 2000 and was inducted as member of the Chilean Acad - emy of Medicine in 2002. He received his M.D. degree from the University of Chile in 1972 and his Ph.D. in nutritional biochemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1977. Keith P. West, Jr., Dr.P.H., M.P.H., R.D. (Planning Committee Member), is the George G. Graham Professor of Infant and Child Nutrition and the Director of the Center and Program for Human Nutrition in the Department of International Health of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Dr. West has worked in international public health nutrition for over three decades, concen- trating on the epidemiology and prevention of vitamin A and other micronutrient deficiencies and their health consequences in children and women of reproductive age in Southern Asia (including Bangladesh, Nepal, Indonesia, Thailand, and the Philippines), the Western Pacific (Micronesia and Marshall Islands) and Africa

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 APPENDIX B (Malawi and Zambia). Before entering academia, Dr. West was trained as a Reg - istered Dietitian in the U.S. Army Medical Specialist Corps, attaining the rank of Major, and served from 1971 to 1976 as a clinical dietitian at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, DC, U.S. Army Hospitals at Ft. Dix, NJ, and on Okinawa, Japan, and as a nutrition consultant in the Office of the Surgeon General in the Pentagon from 1980 to 1984. He served as a field nutritionist in Bangla - desh with Concern (Ireland) Worldwide from 1976 to 1979 where he set up child feeding programs. Dr. West has been on the faculties of the School of Medicine and Public Health at Johns Hopkins since 1982, during which time he established population nutrition research sites in Aceh, Indonesia, the terai of Southern Nepal, and in Northern Bangladesh, and has overseen the conduct of micronu - trient intervention trials among nearly ~100,000 pregnant women and a similar number of infants and preschool aged children to assess impacts on survival, morbidity, growth, development and other health outcomes. He has published more than 160 research papers and scientific reviews, including a book entitled Vitamin A Deficiency: Health, Survival and Vision with Alfred Sommer in 1996. He served on the Steering Committee of the International Vitamin A Consultative Group (IVACG) from 1994 to 2006 and current sites on the Micronutrient Forum Steering Committee. Dr. West was the recipient of the International Nutrition Award from the American Society of Nutrition in 2007. Derek Yach, M.B., Ch.B., M.P.H., is the Senior Vice President of Global Health Policy at PepsiCo where he leads the Global Human Sustainability Task Force and engagement with major international policy, research, and scientific groups. Previously, he has headed global health at the Rockefeller Foundation, been Pro - fessor of Public Health and head of the Division of Global Health at Yale Univer- sity, and is a former Executive Director of the World Health Organization (WHO). Dr. Yach has spearheaded efforts to improve global health. At WHO he served as Cabinet Director under Director-General Gro Harlem Brundtland. Dr. Yach helped place tobacco control, nutrition, and chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease prominently on the agenda of governments, nongovernmental organizations, and the private sector. He led development of WHO’s first treaty, the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, and the development of Global Strategy on Diet and Physical Activity. Dr. Yach is a South African national. He established the Centre for Epidemiological Research at the South African Medical Research Council, which focused on quantifying inequalities and the impact of urbanization on health. He has authored or coauthored more than 200 articles covering the breadth of global health issues. Dr. Yach serves on several advisory boards including those of the Clinton Global Initiative, the World Eco - nomic Forum, the Oxford Health Alliance, and Vitality USA. Dr. Yach received his medical degree from the University of Cape Town Medical School, and his master’s degree in public health from the Johns Hopkins University School of

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 IMPACTS OF THE GLOBAL FOOD PRICE CRISIS Hygiene and Public Health. Further, he has an honorary doctorate in science from Georgetown University. Michael E. Zeilinger, M.D., M.P.H., serves at the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) as Chief of the Nutrition Division in the Bureau for Global Health. His work at USAID includes technical and managerial oversight of food security, malnutrition, child blindness, and broad health research programs. Dr. Zeilinger is also responsible for USAID’s Child Survival and Health Grants Program. Prior to his work with child health, malnutrition, and food security, he served as the manager and senior advisor to USAID’s Infectious Disease Strategic Objective Team, focusing on malaria, tuberculosis, and neglected tropical dis - eases. Dr. Zeilinger also served as a member of the U.S. Delegation Expert Team on Health and Infectious Disease for the G8 Summit in St. Petersburg, Russia, in 2006. Preceding his work at USAID, Dr. Zeilinger served as the Central Asian Regional Director for Project HOPE, working on public- and private-sector- funded tuberculosis control projects in Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, and Turkmenistan. His work in central Asia also included humanitarian assistance and child survival programs. Prior to his tenure in central Asia, Dr. Zeilinger worked with Birch and Davis on the Department of Defense’s Military Health Service System, and the Public Health Foundation on a Empowerment Zones/ Enterprise Communities Health Benchmarks Demonstration Project funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Dr. Zeilinger has managed several community health programs. He currently holds the positions of Adjunct Professor and Professorial Lecturer at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services, Center for Global Health, and Professorial Lecturer at the American University’s School of International Service. In addi - tion to instructing courses, he guest lectures on a variety of topics ranging from emerging infectious diseases, HIV/AIDS, nutrition, integrated management of childhood illnesses, and monitoring and evaluation of international public health programs. Dr. Zeilinger also serves as a member of the board of directors of Jewish Healthcare International. Dr. Zeilinger is a doctor of podiatric medicine and holds a master’s degree in public health (international health promotion) from George Washington University.