FIGURE D.1 A tally of the number of tenure-track positions in Earth surface processes (ESP on the vertical axis) advertised in Eos in selected years suggests a significant increase in the number of these positions between 1990 and 2007. In the absence of the specific term “Earth surface processes” or “surficial processes” in the job description, a position was identified as Earth surface process-related if it (1) focused on processes operating at the surface of the Earth and/or (2) described an intent to integrate research and teaching about Earth’s surface across two or more disciplines, departments, or schools.

FIGURE D.1 A tally of the number of tenure-track positions in Earth surface processes (ESP on the vertical axis) advertised in Eos in selected years suggests a significant increase in the number of these positions between 1990 and 2007. In the absence of the specific term “Earth surface processes” or “surficial processes” in the job description, a position was identified as Earth surface process-related if it (1) focused on processes operating at the surface of the Earth and/or (2) described an intent to integrate research and teaching about Earth’s surface across two or more disciplines, departments, or schools.

in Earth surface processes. Categorizing past position postings using a term that has only recently come into use is a difficult and, to a degree, subjective task because institutions only occasionally labeled their open positions specifically for “Earth surface processes.” Interdisciplinary science such as Earth surface processes can be troublesome to fit into the framework of departments that generally reflect traditional boundaries between disciplines. Thus, positions were categorized as Earth surface process positions if the advertisement described a position that was (1) focused on processes operating at the surface of the Earth and/or (2) intended to integrate across disciplines.

A similar survey of articles in the prominent monthly journal Geology, published by the Geological Society of America (GSA), shows a steady increase in the percentage of articles on Earth surface processes (Figure D.2). This journal encourages publication of articles from across all of the Earth sciences, so it is also widely accessible to and read by a diverse spectrum of researchers. As encountered in the examination of Eos, the categorization of journal articles as Earth surface process-related was not unique because few articles used the full term Earth surface processes to title or describe their work. However, the same criteria used



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