Appendix F
Committee Member and Staff Biographies

COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHIES

Gail L. Warden, M.H.A., FACHE (Chair), serves as president emeritus of Detroit-based Henry Ford Health System and served as its president and chief executive officer (CEO) from 1988 to 2003. He is professor of health management and policy at the University of Michigan, School of Public Health. He is an elected member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences. He served on its Board of Health Care Services, Committee on Quality Health Care in America; chaired the Committee on the Future of Emergency Medicine in the United States; and served two terms on its Governing Council. He is chairman emeritus of the National Quality Forum, chairman emeritus of the National Committee for Quality Assurance, a past chairman of the American Hospital Association, and the chair emeritus of National Center for Healthcare Leadership. He is an emeritus member of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Board of Trustees and serves on the RAND Health Board of Advisors. Mr. Warden holds the position of vice chairman and trustee for the Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science’s Board of Directors, and he chairs the Detroit Wayne County Health Authority and the Detroit Zoological Society. He is also a director for the National Research Corporation’s Board of Directors in Lincoln, Nebraska, and the Picker Institute. He served as a director of Comerica, Inc. from 1990 to 2006. A graduate of Dartmouth College, Mr. Warden holds a master’s degree in hospital adminis-



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Appendix F Committee Member and Staff Biographies COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHIES Gail L. Warden, M.H.A., FACHE (Chair), serves as president emeri- tus of Detroit-based Henry Ford Health System and served as its president and chief executive officer (CEO) from 1988 to 2003. He is professor of health management and policy at the University of Michigan, School of Public Health. He is an elected member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences. He served on its Board of Health Care Services, Committee on Quality Health Care in America; chaired the Committee on the Future of Emergency Medicine in the United States; and served two terms on its Governing Council. He is chairman emeritus of the National Quality Forum, chairman emeritus of the National Committee for Quality Assurance, a past chairman of the American Hospital Asso - ciation, and the chair emeritus of National Center for Healthcare Leadership. He is an emeritus member of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Board of Trustees and serves on the RAND Health Board of Advisors. Mr. Warden holds the position of vice chairman and trustee for the Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Sci- ence’s Board of Directors, and he chairs the Detroit Wayne County Health Authority and the Detroit Zoological Society. He is also a director for the National Research Corporation’s Board of Directors in Lincoln, Nebraska, and the Picker Institute. He served as a direc - tor of Comerica, Inc. from 1990 to 2006. A graduate of Dartmouth College, Mr. Warden holds a master’s degree in hospital adminis- 267

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268 REDESIGNING CE IN THE HEALTH PROFESSIONS tration from the University of Michigan. Mr. Warden received an honorary doctorate in public administration from Central Michigan University and an honorary doctorate of humane health care from Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science. Jako S. Burgers, M.D., Ph.D., is general practitioner, senior consul- tant at the Dutch Institute for Healthcare Improvement (CBO), and senior researcher at IQ healthcare, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre. Since 1995 he has worked part-time in a general practice in Gorinchem. In the academic year 2008-2009, he was Harkness fellow of the International Program in Health Policy & Practice of the Commonwealth Fund, hosted at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston. From 1992 to 2002 he worked as a staff member at the Dutch College of General Practitioners and was involved in evidence-based guideline development and con- tinuing medical education programs. From 1998 to 2003 he was coinvestigator in the international AGREE (Appraisal Guidelines Research and Evaluation) project. His thesis “Quality of Clinical Practice Guidelines” was rewarded with the CaRE Award 2002 of the Netherlands School of Primary Care Research. He is trustee of the AGREE Research Trust and founding member of the Guidelines International Network (G-I-N). In 2007-2008, he served as chair of the network and gave several lectures and training workshops on guideline development, adaptation, and implementation in Taiwan, Australia, Saudi Arabia, and Europe. Linda Burnes Bolton, Dr.P.H., R.N., FAAN, vice president and chief nursing officer at Cedars-Sinai, is the recipient of the American Organization of Nurse Executives (AONE) 2007 Lifetime Achieve- ment Award. As founder of the recently renamed Geri and Richard Brawerman Nursing Institute at Cedars-Sinai, Burnes Bolton over- sees development of educational programs in collaboration with nursing schools to increase the supply of nurses, supports research and innovation to improve clinical outcomes, and creates outreach programs to inform students about careers in nursing. Her primary research focuses on women’s health, health policy, and organiza- tional development. She has also taken an active leadership role in groundbreaking nursing initiatives such as Transforming Care at the Bedside (TCAB), a national program to improve patient care created and sponsored by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. She serves as chair of the National Advisory Committee.

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269 APPENDIX F Catherine DeAngelis, M.D., M.P.H., is editor-in-chief of JAMA, the Journal of the American Medical Association; senior vice president, Scientific Publications and Multimedia Applications; and professor of pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine. She received her M.D. from the University of Pittsburgh’s School of Medicine, her M.P.H. from the Harvard Graduate School of Public Health (health services administration), and her pediatric specialty training at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. Dr. DeAngelis oversees JAMA as well as nine Archives publications and JAMA-related web- site content. Before her appointment with JAMA, she was vice dean for academic affairs and faculty, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and from 1994 to 2000, she was editor of Archies of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine. She also has been a member of the editorial boards of numerous journal. She has authored or edited 11 books on pediatrics and medical education and has published more than 200 original articles, chapters, editorials, and abstracts. Most of her recent publications have focused on conflicts of interest in medicine, on women in medicine, and on medical education. Dr. DeAngelis is a former council member of the National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Medicine; is a fellow of the American Associa- tion for the Advancement of Science; and has served as an officer of numerous national academic societies, including past chairman of the American Board of Pediatrics and chair of the Pediatric Accredi - tation Council for Residency Review Committee of the American Council on Graduate Medical Education. She currently serves on the Advisory Committee to the Director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Advisory Board of the U.S. Government Accountability Office-Comptroller General. Robert D. Fox, Ed.D., is professor emeritus of adult and higher education, Department of Educational Leadership, University of Oklahoma, and director of educational research and development, AO Foundation, Davos, Switzerland (part time). His educational background includes doctor of education in adult education, North Carolina State University, 1979; and master of science in adult edu- cation, University of Tennessee in Knoxville, 1975. His professional experience includes administrative positions in continuing education at the University of Tennessee and the University of North Carolina Greensboro, director of the Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology at the medical college of East Tennessee State University, and direc- tor of the Research Center in Continuing Professional and Higher Education at the University of Oklahoma. His academic positions as full-time faculty have included assistant and associate professor

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270 REDESIGNING CE IN THE HEALTH PROFESSIONS of medical education at the Medical College at East Tennessee State University and professor of adult and higher education at the Uni- versity of Oklahoma. His research and publications have focused on the process of change in practice and how and why physicians learn. He retired from full-time teaching at the University of Okla- homa in 2008. Sherry A. Glied, Ph.D., is professor and chair in the Department of Health Policy and Management of Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. She holds a Ph.D. in economics from Har- vard University. In 1992-1993, she served as a senior economist for health care and labor market policy to the President’s Council of Economic Advisers, under President Bush and President Clinton. Her research on health policy has focused on the financing of health care services in the United States. Her book on health care reform, Chronic Condition, was published by Harvard University Press in January 1998. She is coauthor (with Richard Frank) of Better but Not Well: Mental Health Policy in the US Since 1950, published by Johns Hopkins University Press in July 2006. Kendall Ho, M.D., FRCPC, is a practicing emergency physician at the Vancouver General Hospital Department of Emergency Medicine. He is the eHealth strategy director, University of Brit - ish Columbia Faculty of Medicine, and was the immediate past associate dean and director of the Division of Continuing Medical Education of the same university. Dr. Kendall Ho’s academic and research interest lies in the domain of technology-enabled knowl- edge translation (TEKT)—the use of modern information and com- munication technologies to accelerate the incorporation of evidence into routine practice. His specific research areas in TEKT include the incorporation of adult learning principles into the development of effective and relevant medical education for health profession- als; the integration of telecommunication and medical informat- ics technologies to assist rural and urban health professionals to obtain their continuing education and clinical support on demand; interprofessional team-based practice facilitated by eHealth; and the engagement of the general public using information technologies to promote improved self-management. These areas of interest have led to the development of innovative hands-on workshops to teach physicians skills in using the Internet and personal digital assistants (e.g., Palm Pilots) for professional use, videoconferencing and Inter- net-based continuing medical educational courses for distributive learning, telemedicine pilot and implementation projects between

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271 APPENDIX F urban and rural communities, Web 2.0 for health professionals and consumers, and scientific abstracts, editorials, and journal articles on the subjects of medical education, biomedical and health informat - ics, and telehealth. Edward F. Lawlor, Ph.D., researches and writes on access to health care, health care reform, policy analysis, and aging. A national Medi- care expert, he is the author of Redesigning the Medicare Contract: Politics, Markets, and Agency. Dean Lawlor is the founding director of Washington University’s Institute for Public Health. He teaches classes on health care policy and services. Prior to joining the Brown School he served as dean at the School of Social Service Administra- tion at the University of Chicago from 1998 to 2004. From 1990 to 1998, he was the director of both the Center for Health Administra- tion Studies and the Graduate Program in Health Administration and Policy at the University of Chicago. He is founding editor of the Public Policy and Aging Report. For 10 years Dr. Lawlor was a member and secretary of the Chicago Board of Health, and he has served on numerous policy and advisory bodies in the fields of health care and aging. David C. Leach, M.D., is the retired CEO of the Accreditation Coun- cil for Graduate Medical Education. He was born in Elmira, New York, received a B.A. from the University of Toronto in 1965 and an M.D. from the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry in 1969. He completed residency training in internal medi- cine and endocrinology at the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit and is certified in those disciplines. He also had additional training in pediatric endocrinology. He was awarded the Good Samaritan Award by Governor John Engler for his work over 25 years at a Free Clinic in Detroit. He was assistant dean at the University of Michigan for several years, primarily directing the Henry Ford experiences for Michigan students. He was a residency program director and designated institutional official at Henry Ford. He is interested in how physicians acquire competence and are enabled to be authentic practitioners of the art, science, and craft of medicine. He received grant support for innovative curricula for both medical students and residents from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Pew Charitable Trust. He is interested in chaordic organiza- tions, the teaching of improvement skills, aligning accreditation with emerging health care practices, and the use of educational outcome measures as an accreditation tool. He has received honorary degrees from four medical schools. He is interested in honoring program

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272 REDESIGNING CE IN THE HEALTH PROFESSIONS directors through the Parker J. Palmer Courage to Teach Award. He is a member of the Gold Humanism Honorary Society and is deeply interested in the use of values as well as rules in guiding the behav- ior of physicians and teachers. He believes that we teach who we are as well as what we are. He is the 2007 recipient of the Abraham Flexner Award for Distinguished Service to Medical Education. Lucinda Maine, Ph.D., is executive vice president and CEO of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) in Alex- andria, Virginia. AACP member schools are accredited providers of continuing education, and AACP works with the Accrediting Council for Pharmacy Education on standards and guidelines for its accreditation of continuing professional education (CPE) pro- viders. While serving as associate dean for student and alumni affairs at Samford University in Birmingham, Alabama, she directed a program of continuing professional education for pharmacists and other health professionals. She serves as president-elect of the Federation of Associations of Schools of Health Professions and works closely with colleagues from dentistry, nursing, medicine, public health, and allied health professions through this collabora - tion. AACP does provide educational programs for members but is not an accredited provider of continuing education. She reports no personal conflicts of interest related to continuing education in the health professions. Paul E. Mazmanian, Ph.D., is a professor at Virginia Commonwealth University with a joint appointment in the Departments of Family Medicine and of Epidemiology and Community Health. He serves as associate dean, Continuing Professional Development and Evalu- ation Studies, School of Medicine. For 8 years he was chairman of the Master of Public Health Curriculum Committee, leading the pro- gram to its first successful academic accreditation. Dr. Mazmanian’s research interests include learning and change in physician per- formance. From 1993 to 1997, he was a member of the Study Sec- tion on Health Services Research Dissemination, Agency for Health Care Policy and Research. In 2000, he served as a consultant to the National Research Council, Institute of Medicine, in its efforts to assess prevention and treatment programs associated with violence in families. From August 2004 through February 2005, he consulted with the National Cancer Institute (NCI), helping with NCI’s efforts to expedite the translation of new knowledge into clinical solutions. In 2007, he was an invited participant of the Josiah Macy, Jr. Founda- tion Conference “Continuing Education in the Health Professions.”

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273 APPENDIX F Dr. Mazmanian is completing his eighth year as editor of the Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions. Michael W. Painter, J.D., M.D., a distinguished physician, attorney, health care policy advocate, and 2003-2004 Robert Wood Johnson (RWJF) health policy fellow, is a senior program officer and a senior member of the RWJF Quality/Equality Team. In 2003-2004, Painter was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation health policy fellow with the office of Senator William H. Frist, M.D., former majority leader. Dr. Painter describes this role as an extraordinary opportunity to employ both his medical and his legal expertise in helping to for- mulate health care policy at the national level. Prior to that, he was the chief of medical staff at the Seattle Indian Health Board, a com- munity health center serving urban American Indians and Alaska Natives. Dr. Painter led that clinic’s award-winning diabetes team. He has a clinical faculty appointment with the University of Wash- ington, Department of Family Medicine. Dr. Painter served as the co-chair for the 2002-2003 Washington State Department of Health Collaborative on Adult Preventive Services and also served as a medical educator and consultant for the Northwest AIDS Education and Training Center. He is a policy advocate at the national, state, and local levels regarding health care issues affecting urban Ameri- can Indians and Alaska Natives. He is a member of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma and the California Bar Association. Dr. Painter earned a B.A. in economics and mathematics from Vanderbilt Uni- versity, graduating summa cum laude, and is a member of Phi Beta Kappa. He also earned a J.D. from Stanford Law School and an M.D. from the University of Washington. He received his residency train- ing at the Providence Family Medicine Residency in Seattle and is a board-certified family physician. Wendy Rheault, P.T., Ph.D., is vice president for academic affairs, dean of the College of Health Professions and professor of physical therapy at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science in North Chicago, Illinois. Dr. Rheault received a B.S. in physical therapy from Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada, in 1978. In 1981 she received an M.A. in curriculum and instruc- tion from the University of Chicago. In 1989, she was subsequently awarded a Ph.D. (Department of Education) in measurement, evalu- ation, and statistical analysis, also from the University of Chicago. Accepting the position of vice president of academic affairs in July 2008 while continuing as dean of the College of Health Professions, Dr. Rheault’s vice presidential leadership responsibilities encompass

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274 REDESIGNING CE IN THE HEALTH PROFESSIONS the Division of Student Affairs, Learning Resources, Enrollment Services, Educational Affairs, and the Education and Evaluation Center. In her capacity as vice president, Dr. Rheault is also an ad hoc member of the Academic Committee of the Board. Marie E. Sinioris, M.P.H., is president and CEO of the National Center for Healthcare Leadership (NCHL), a not-for-profit organiza- tion whose mission is to be a catalyst to ensure that high quality, rel- evant, and accountable health management leadership is available to meet the needs of twenty-first century health care. Ms. Sinioris, a co-founder of NCHL, provides overall strategic direction and leads NCHL’s national research and demonstration programs on health leadership competencies and best practices that contribute to leader- ship and organizational excellence. The adoption of best practices is accelerated through shared learning and benchmarking within NCHL’s nationally recognized Leadership Excellence Networks (LENS). NCHL’s goal is to improve the health status of the entire country through effective health care management leadership. Prior to assuming this national role, Ms. Sinioris was president and CEO of Arc Ventures, LLC, a diversified health care company affiliated with Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke’s Medical Center in Chicago, Illi- nois. As president, she directed the development and record growth of Arc’s diversified portfolio of businesses. While with Rush, she also served as corporate vice president of strategic planning and senior vice president and chief operating officer of Rush Health Plans, a health maintenance organization-preferred provider organization (HMO-PPO) covering more than a quarter of a million people in the Chicago metropolitan area. She is a professor in the Department of Health Systems Management at Rush University. STAFF BIOGRAPHIES Cassandra Cacace is a senior program assistant for the Board on Health Care Services, assisting on a variety of projects, including the Committee on Continuing Education, the Committee on Resident Duty Hours and Patient Safety, and the Forum on the Science of Health Care Quality Improvement and Implementation. She pro- vides administrative and research support to the teams, as well as logistical support for all committee meetings. Prior to the IOM, Cas - sandra worked as a research associate at Oxford Outcomes, a health care consulting firm, where she performed outcomes research on a variety of health conditions. She is currently pursuing her master’s

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275 APPENDIX F degree in health policy from the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services. Samantha M. Chao, M.P.H., is a program officer at the Institute of Medicine, working on issues related to health care quality. Most recently she directed the Forum on the Science of Health Care Qual- ity Improvement and Implementation, which brought together leaders in the field to discuss methods to improve the quality and value of health care through the strengthening of research. She pre- viously staffed the Pathways to Quality Health Care Series that reviewed performance measures to analyze health care delivery, evaluated Medicare’s Quality Improvement Organization Program, and assessed pay for performance and its potential role in Medi- care. Prior to joining the IOM, she completed a master’s degree in health policy with a concentration in management at the University of Michigan, School of Public Health. As part of her studies, she interned with the American Heart Association and the Michigan Department of Community Health. Roger C. Herdman, M.D., was born in Boston, Massachusetts, and attended Phillips Exeter Academy, graduating in 1951; he received degrees from Yale University, B.S., magna cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa, in 1955 and Yale University School of Medicine, M.D., in 1958. He interned at the University of Minnesota and was a medical officer in the U.S. Navy from 1959 to 1961. Thereafter, he completed a residency in pediatrics and continued with a medical fellowship in immunology-nephrology at Minnesota. He held positions of assis- tant professor and professor of pediatrics at the University of Min- nesota and the Albany Medical College between 1966 and 1979. In 1969, he was appointed director of the New York State Kidney Dis - ease Institute in Albany. During 1969-1977 he served as deputy com- missioner of the New York State Department of Health responsible for research, departmental health care facilities, and the Medicaid program at various times. In 1977, he was named New York State’s director of public health. From 1979 until joining the U.S. Congress’s Office of Technology Assessment (OTA), he was a vice president of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. In 1983, he was named assistant director of OTA and then acting director and director from January 1993 to February 1996. After the closure of OTA, he joined the National Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Medicine as a senior scholar and subsequently served as director of the National Cancer Policy Board and the National

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276 REDESIGNING CE IN THE HEALTH PROFESSIONS Cancer Policy Forum. He is now the director of the Board on Health Care Services. Bernadette McFadden, M.Sc., joined the Board on Health Care Ser- vices as a research associate in November 2008. Prior to joining the IOM, she completed a master’s degree in social research at Trinity College, Dublin. As part of her studies, she was employed by Dub- lin City Council’s Homeless Agency, where she edited a volume of essays on homelessness in Ireland and wrote a report on how the city’s management of public space impacts homeless persons. Her interests in health policy developed while employed as an Ameri - Corps teacher in the Atlanta Public Schools system. She graduated summa cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa, from Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. While in central Pennsylvania, she interned with the Executive Policy Office of the Pennsylvania Department of Health and served as a board member on the United Way of Cum- berland County. Adam Schickedanz is a senior medical student at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF); a graduate of Washington Univer- sity in St. Louis (B.A., 2003); and a Boston native. At UCSF Adam has developed a clinical focus in urban underserved patient care, while also advancing interests in professionalism and cultural com- petency in medical education, novel approaches to clinician-patient communication in medical decision making (particularly at the end of life), and the intersections of education and health. He interned with the Board on Health Care Services and was a Mirzayan policy fellow through May 2009, when he returned to UCSF to complete his M.D.