FIGURE 2.3 Estimates of potential energy savings in the industrial sector in 2020 (relative to 2007) compared to total delivered energy in the industrial sector . Current (2007) U.S. delivered energy in the industrial sector is shown on the left, along with projections for 2020 and 2030. T o estimate savings, an accelerated deployment of technologies as described in Part 2 of this report is assumed. Combining the projected growth with the potential savings results in lower energy consumption in the industrial sector in 2020 (7.7 quads) than exists today. A more conservative scenario described in Chapter 4 could result in energy savings of 4.9 quads. The committee did not estimate savings for 2030. Delivered energy is defined as the energy content of the electricity and primary fuels brought to the point of use. All values have been rounded to two significant digits.

FIGURE 2.3 Estimates of potential energy savings in the industrial sector in 2020 (relative to 2007) compared to total delivered energy in the industrial sector . Current (2007) U.S. delivered energy in the industrial sector is shown on the left, along with projections for 2020 and 2030. T o estimate savings, an accelerated deployment of technologies as described in Part 2 of this report is assumed. Combining the projected growth with the potential savings results in lower energy consumption in the industrial sector in 2020 (7.7 quads) than exists today. A more conservative scenario described in Chapter 4 could result in energy savings of 4.9 quads. The committee did not estimate savings for 2030. Delivered energy is defined as the energy content of the electricity and primary fuels brought to the point of use. All values have been rounded to two significant digits.

Sources: Data from Energy Information Administration (2008) and Part 2 of this report.

and steel, and cement industries. The increased use of combined heat and power in industry is estimated to contribute a large fraction of these potential savings—up to 2 quads per year in 2020.

In the transportation sector, energy savings can be achieved by increasing the efficiencies with which liquid fuels (especially petroleum) are used and by shifting the energy source for part of the light-duty vehicle (LDV) fleet from petroleum to electric power. Of course, the environmental impacts of such a fuel shift are dependent on how electricity (or hydrogen, if fuel-cell vehicles are produced) is generated. Moreover , electrification of LDVs will increase the overall demand for electricity . Shifting this electricity demand to off-peak times (e.g., at night),



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