Appendix A
Biographies of Committee Members

William E. Kirwan (Chair) has been chancellor of the University System of Maryland since August 2002. A widely respected academic leader, Dr. Kirwan served as president of Ohio State University for 4 years (1998-2002) and as president of the University of Maryland, College Park, for 10 years (1988-1998). Prior to his presidency, he was a member of the University of Maryland faculty for 34 years. Dr. Kirwan is also a nationally recognized authority on critical issues shaping the higher-education landscape. He is a sought-after speaker on a wide range of topics, including diversity, access and affordability, cost containment, accountability, economic impact, gender equity, financial aid, partnerships, and innovation. Along with his national and international presentations on key issues, Dr. Kirwan has authored several pieces and has been profiled as a national education leader in academic and mainstream publications. In May 2006, Dr. Kirwan was appointed to serve on the Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics and became co-chair of the commission in May 2007. He also serves on the board of directors of the Council for Higher Education Accreditation and is a member of the Business-Higher Education Forum. He is past chair of the National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges (NASULGC) board of directors and of the American Council on Education’s board. He is the current chair of NASULGC’s Committee on Student Learning and Accountability. He was appointed by President Clinton to serve as a member of the National Commission on Mathematics and Science Teaching for the 21st Century, and he chaired the National Research Council’s Commission on the Mathematical Sciences in the Year 2000, which produced the 1991 report Moving Beyond Myths: Revitalizing Undergraduate Mathematics. President George W. Bush appointed Dr. Kirwan to the Board of Advisors on Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Dr. Kirwan received his bachelor’s degree in mathematics from the University of Kentucky and his master’s and doctoral degrees in mathematics from Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, in 1962 and 1964, respectively. He is a member of several honorary and professional societies, including Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Kappa Phi, the American Mathematical Society, and the Mathematical Association of America. A prolific scholar, he is co-editor of the book Advances in Complex Analysis and has published many articles on mathematical research. The recipient of many honors, Dr. Kirwan has been elected to the Hall of Distinguished Alumni at both the University of Kentucky and Rutgers University. He also was selected to receive the Rutgers



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Appendix A Biographies of Committee Members William E. Kirwan (Chair) has been chancellor of the University System of Maryland since August 2002. A widely respected academic leader, Dr. Kirwan served as president of Ohio State University for 4 years (1998-2002) and as president of the University of Maryland, College Park, for 10 years (1988- 1998). Prior to his presidency, he was a member of the University of Maryland faculty for 34 years. Dr. Kirwan is also a nationally recognized authority on critical issues shaping the higher-education landscape. He is a sought-after speaker on a wide range of topics, including diversity, access and afford - ability, cost containment, accountability, economic impact, gender equity, financial aid, partnerships, and innovation. Along with his national and international presentations on key issues, Dr. Kirwan has authored several pieces and has been profiled as a national education leader in academic and main - stream publications. In May 2006, Dr. Kirwan was appointed to serve on the Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics and became co-chair of the commission in May 2007. He also serves on the board of directors of the Council for Higher Education Accreditation and is a member of the Business- Higher Education Forum. He is past chair of the National Association of State Universities and Land- Grant Colleges (NASULGC) board of directors and of the American Council on Education’s board. He is the current chair of NASULGC’s Committee on Student Learning and Accountability. He was appointed by President Clinton to serve as a member of the National Commission on Mathematics and Science Teaching for the 21st Century, and he chaired the National Research Council’s Commission on the Mathematical Sciences in the Year 2000, which produced the 1991 report Moing Beyond Myths: Reitalizing Undergraduate Mathematics. President George W. Bush appointed Dr. Kirwan to the Board of Advisors on Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Dr. Kirwan received his bachelor’s degree in mathematics from the University of Kentucky and his master’s and doctoral degrees in mathematics from Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, in 1962 and 1964, respectively. He is a member of several honorary and professional societies, including Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Kappa Phi, the American Mathematical Society, and the Mathematical Association of America. A prolific scholar, he is co-editor of the book Adances in Complex Analysis and has published many articles on mathematical research. The recipient of many honors, Dr. Kirwan has been elected to the Hall of Distinguished Alumni at both the University of Kentucky and Rutgers University. He also was selected to receive the Rutgers 

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 EVALUATION OF NSF’S VIGRE PROGRAM University Award for Career Achievement on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the founding of that university’s graduate school. Dr. Kirwan received the 2004 National Innovators Award, the highest honor awarded by Minority Access, Inc., recognizing his commitment to diversity and to improving the recruitment and retention of minorities. In 2002, he was elected a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Kirwan received the Maryland Senate’s First Citizen of Maryland Award in 1998, and on February 15, 2007, he became the 16th recipient of the Maryland House of Delegates Speaker’s Medallion, which recognizes Maryland citizens who have demonstrated exemplary service to the House and to the State of Maryland. Efraim Armendariz is chair of the Department of Mathematics at the University of Texas at Austin, a position that he has held since 1991. Dr. Armendariz received the BA and MS degrees in mathematics from Texas A&M University in 1960 and 1962, respectively, and received the PhD in mathematics from the University of Nebraska (Lincoln) in 1966. He has published more than 40 research articles in this area, as well as a book on elementary number theory, and has supervised 6 doctoral students in math - ematics, 3 in science and mathematics education, and 31 master’s students. Dr. Armendariz has also been actively involved in the development of educational programs that address questions of accessibility, as well as development of secondary mathematics teachers. In 1988, he established the Emerging Scholars Program at the University of Texas at Austin, an intervention program designed to enhance academic success in calculus among students of mathematics and science and engineering who are from tradition - ally underrepresented groups. He is a member of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA). In this capacity he has served as Level III director (1992-1996), chair of the Texas Section (1996-1997), and arrangements chair and organizer for the annual meeting of the Texas Section in April 2000. He has also served and chaired various national committees, including the MAA Committee on Minority Participation in Mathematics. He is currently a member of the board of governors of the MAA, serv - ing as governor-at-large for minority interests. Dr. Armendariz’s other professional service includes membership and chairing of postdoctoral selection panels for the National Science Foundation and the Ford Foundation, member of the Human Resources Advisory Committee of the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute, and member of the Committee of Visitors for the NSF Division of Mathematical Sciences. John A. Burns is the Hatcher Professor of Mathematics at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and the technical director of the Interdisciplinary Center for Applied Mathematics. He has published more than 140 research papers on computational methods for the identification, optimization, and control of systems governed by partial and functional differential equations. He has directed more than 20 PhD students and 10 MS theses. He has served on more than 12 editorial boards, and he was the founding editor of the SIAM [Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics] Activity Book Series on Advances in Design and Control. He has served as vice president of SIAM, is the past chair of the SIAM Group on Systems and Control, and is a fellow of the IEEE. Dr. Burns’s primary interests concern the development of rigorous and practical computational algorithms for the design and optimization of engineering and biological systems. He has applied his research to a wide variety of areas, including fluid dynamics, smart materials, large-space structures, nanodevices, aerodynamic design, and energy- efficient buildings. Dr. Burns has been a consultant and adviser to Booz Allen and Hamilton, NASA Langley Research Center, the Air Force Research Laboratory, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Babcock and Wilcox Company, Solers Inc., and the United Technologies Research Center. He has held several academic visiting positions in the United States and Europe.

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 APPENDIX A C. Herbert Clemens is a professor of mathematics at the Ohio State University, specializing in complex geometry. Prior to joining Ohio State, he was on the faculty of Columbia University and the University of Utah. He is the winner of a Fulbright Fellowship and a Sloan Fellowship, and currently chairs the U.S. National Committee on Mathematics of the National Research Council. Dona L. Crawford is associate director for computation at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). She is responsible for the development and deployment of an integrated computing environment for terascale simulations of complex physical phenomena. This environment includes high-performance computers, scientific visualization facilities, high-performance storage systems, network connectivity, multi-resolution data analysis, mathematical models, scalable numerical algorithms, computer appli- cations, and necessary services to enable laboratory mission goals and scientific discovery through simulation. Prior to her LLNL appointment in July 2001, Ms. Crawford had been with Sandia National Laboratories since 1976, serving on many leadership projects, including the Accelerated Strategic Com - puting Initiative, the Nuclear Weapons Policy Board, and the Nuclear Weapons Strategic Business Unit. Ms. Crawford has served on advisory committees for the National Science Foundation, the National Research Council, and the Council on Competitiveness. She is on the Civilian Research and Develop - ment Foundation Board, is a member of the IEEE and the Association for Computing Machinery, is active in the U.S. high-performance networking and computing conference series, and participates in community outreach activities to promote mathematics and science. She holds a BS degree in math - ematics from the University of Redlands, California, and an MS degree in operations research from Stanford University. Christine M. Cumming is first vice president of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and serves as its chief operating officer. She is an alternate voting member of the Federal Open Market Committee. Dr. Cumming joined the Bank’s staff in September 1979 as an economist in the International Research Department. While on the Bank’s International Capital Markets staff, she worked on topics such as the liquidity of banks and securities firms and the international competitiveness of U.S. financial institutions. In the 1990s, Dr. Cumming was a senior officer in Bank Supervision. She was active in the work of the Basel Committee, including the development of the market risk amendment to the Basel Accord and of risk management guidance for banks and bank supervisors. Prior to being named to her current position, she was executive vice president and director of research with responsibility for the Research and Market Analysis Group. Dr. Cumming earned a PhD in economics from the University of Minnesota. Lawrence Craig Evans is a professor in the Department of Mathematics at the University of California at Berkeley (UCB). He is a highly respected core mathematician. He is director of the Center for Pure and Applied Mathematics at UCB and is a member of the National Research Council’s Board on Math - ematical Sciences and Their Applications. He recently won the prestigious Leroy P. Steele Prize for Seminal Contributions to Research, awarded by the American Mathematical Society. Charles L. Fefferman is a professor in the Department of Mathematics at Princeton University. He received his bachelor’s degrees in physics and mathematics at the age of 17 from the University of Maryland and a PhD in mathematics at 20 from Princeton University. Dr. Fefferman received full pro - fessorship at the University of Chicago at the age of 22, making him the youngest full professor ever appointed in the United States. At 24, he returned to Princeton to assume a full professorship there, a position that he still holds. He won the Alan T. Waterman Award in 1976 and the Fields medal in 1978 for his work in mathematical analysis, and he was elected in 1979 to the National Academy of Sciences.

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6 EVALUATION OF NSF’S VIGRE PROGRAM Martin Golubitsky is Distinguished Professor of Mathematics and Physical Sciences at Ohio State University and director of the Mathematical Biosciences Institute. His research centers on the theory and application of bifurcation theory, particularly in the presence of symmetry. He received his PhD in math - ematics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1970 and has held positions at the Uni - versity of California at Los Angeles, MIT, Queens College of the City University of New York, Arizona State University, and the University of Houston. Dr. Golubitsky is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and the recipient of the 1997 University of Houston Esther Farfel Award and the 2001 Ferran Sunyer I Balaguer Prize for The Symmetry Perspectie. He has been elected to the Councils of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM), AAAS, and the American Mathematical Society. Dr. Golubitsky was the founding editor-in-chief of the SIAM Journal on Applied Dynamical Systems, chair of the SIAM Activity Group on Dynamical Systems, and president of SIAM. Mark L. Green is a professor in the Department of Mathematics at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA). He received his BS from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and his MA and PhD from Princeton University. After teaching at the University of California at Berkeley and MIT, he came to UCLA as an assistant professor in 1975. He was a founding co-director of the NSF- funded Institute for Pure and Applied Mathematics. Dr. Green’s research has taken him into several areas of mathematics: several complex variables, differential geometry, commutative algebra, Hodge theory, and algebraic geometry. He received an Alfred P. Sloan fellowship and was an invited speaker at the International Congress of Mathematicians in Berlin. Leo P. Kadanoff is a professor of mathematics and statistics at the University of Chicago. He is a theoretical physicist who has contributed widely to research in the properties of matter, to the develop - ment of urban areas, and to statistical models of physical systems. His best-known contribution was in the development of the concepts of “scale invariance” and “universality” as they are applied to phase transitions. More recently, he has been involved in the understanding of the onset of chaos in simple mechanical and fluid systems. His academic degrees were received from Harvard University in the period 1957-1960. After a postdoctoral period at the Neils Bohr Institute in Copenhagen, he joined the staff of the University of Illinois in 1962 and became a professor of physics there in 1965. During this period he carried out research activities aimed at understanding the properties of matter, especially the phenomenon of superconductivity, and he performed research and development work aimed at heat protection for ballistic missiles. In 1966-1967, he carried out research into the organization of matter in “phase transitions” that led to a substantial modification of physicists’ way of looking at these changes in the state of matter. This work led to his receipt of the Buckley Prize of the American Physical Society (1977), the Wolf Foundation Prize in 1980, and the 1989 Boltzmann Medal of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics. Dr. Kadanoff moved to the University of Chicago in 1978, where he became the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Distinguished Service Professor of Physics and Mathematics. At the University of Chicago, he has also been particularly interested in complexity, fluid flow, and the applications of computers to physical calculations. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and of the American Philosophical Society as well as being a fellow of the American Physical Society and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. During the past decade, he has received the Quantrell Award (for excellence in teaching) from the University of Chicago, the Centennial Medal of Harvard University, the Onsager Prize of the American Physical Society, the Grande Medaille d’Or of the Academy des Sciences de l’Institut de France, and the National Medal of Science (U.S.).

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 APPENDIX A Daniel L. Solomon is professor of statistics and dean of the College of Physical and Mathematical Sci - ences at North Carolina State University. Dr. Solomon began his career in 1968 at Cornell University, moving through the ranks to professor of biological statistics and heading the Biometrics Unit there from 1977 to 1981. In 1981, Dr. Solomon came to North Carolina State University as professor and head of the Department of Statistics, a position that he held until 1993. He was named dean of the college effective July 1, 2000. Dr. Solomon is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, founding member of the corporation for the National Institute of Statistical Sciences, and current chair of the governing board of the Statistical and Applied Mathematical Sciences Institute. Lynn Arthur Steen is professor of mathematics and special assistant to the provost at Saint Olaf College. After receiving his PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), he focused his early professional energy on research experiences for undergraduates and on mathematical exposi - tion, the communication of mathematical research to the broader public. In this capacity he served as mathematics secretary of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and as the first mathematics editor for Science News. In the 1980s, he helped lead national efforts to modernize the teaching of calculus. During 1985-1986 he served as president of the Mathematical Association of America and later as chair of the Council of Scientific Society Presidents. Recently he has worked with Achieve, Inc., to upgrade standards for school mathematics and with the National Council on Education and the Disciplines to stimulate attention to quantitative literacy across college campuses. The author of more than 200 articles on mathematics and education, Dr. Steen has served as both a member of and staff director for the National Research Council’s Mathematical Sciences Education Board. Dr. Steen is a fellow of the AAAS, the 1989 recipient of a Board of Directors Special Award from Sigma Xi, the 1992 Distinguished Service to Mathematics award from the Mathematical Association of America, and three honorary ScD degrees. Karen L. Vogtmann is a professor of mathematics at Cornell University, specializing in geometric group theory. She has held faculty positions at the University of Michigan, Brandeis University, and Columbia University, and research positions at the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute at the University of California at Berkeley and the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton University, as well as at vari - ous international institutions. She is a member of the U.S. National Committee on Mathematics and of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Mathematical Science Research Institute. She is also a member of the board of trustees of the American Mathematical Society (AMS) and is the board liaison to the Committee on Science Policy. She served previously as a vice president of the AMS and as a member of the AMS Committee on Education. Eric W. Welch is an associate professor and director of graduate studies in the Public Administration Program at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). His research focuses on environmental policy, science and technology policy, research and development (R&D) performance evaluation, and electronic government. His research has been published in such journals as Transportation Research–D, Policy Sci- ences, Enironmental Science and Policy, Journal of Public Policy and Management, Political Commu- nication, and Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory. He is currently working on a book on R&D evaluation methods titled The New Generation of R&D Ealuation Methods: A Cross-National Reiew of Performance Measurement, to be published by Edward Elgar. Professor Welch is involved in numerous research projects, including an NSF-funded effort on Women in Science and Engineering: Network Access, Participation and Outcomes; a longitudinal evaluation of research outcomes of the Mid-America Earthquake Center; and an ongoing research contract with the Chicago Transit Authority

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 EVALUATION OF NSF’S VIGRE PROGRAM to undertake transit-relevant research in the Chicago metropolitan area. Professor Welch arrived at UIC in 1999 after research appointments at the U.S. Center for Economic Studies, the Center for Technology and Information Policy at Syracuse University, the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, and the Japan National Institute for Environmental Studies. Shmuel Winograd is an IBM Fellow at the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center. He received his BSc and MSc in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1959 and his PhD in mathematics from New York University in 1968. He joined IBM in 1961 as a research staff member and was appointed IBM Fellow in 1972. In 1970-1974, and again in 1980-1994, he was the director of the Mathematical Sciences Department at IBM Research. Dr. Winograd’s research interests include complexity of computations and the design of efficient algorithms. He is a fellow of the IEEE and the Association for Computing Machinery, a member of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, and was elected to membership in the National Academy of Sciences, the American Acad - emy of Arts and Science, and the American Philosophical Society. He is a former chair of the National Research Council’s Board on Mathematical Sciences and Their Applications.