Appendix A
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Natalie W. Crawford, NAE, Co-Chair, is a senior fellow at the RAND Corporation, senior mentor for the USAF Scientific Advisory Board, and member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE). Natalie Crawford has worked at RAND for more than 40 years. She served for nine years as vice president and director of RAND Project AIR FORCE from September 1997 to October 2006. She has deep, substantive technical and operational knowledge and experience in areas such as conventional weapons, attack and surveillance avionics, fighter and bomber aircraft performance, aircraft survivability, electronic combat, theater missile defense, force modernization, space systems and capabilities, and non-kinetic operations. She has been a member of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board since 1988, and was its vice chairman in 1990 and cochairman from 1996 to 1999. In 2006, Mrs. Crawford received the OSD Medal for Exceptional Public Service and a Lifetime Achievement Award from the National Defense Industrial Association's Combat Survivability Division, as well as the RAND Medal for Excellence. In 2003 she received the Air Force Analytic Community's Lifetime Achievement Award and the Vance R. Wanner Memorial Award from the Military Operations Research Society. In addition, she received the Department of the Air Force Decoration for Exceptional Civilian Service in 1995 and again in 2003. Mrs. Crawford has a bachelor’s in mathematics from UCLA where she also pursued graduate study in applied mathematics and engineering.


George K. Muellner, Co-Chair, is a fellow and president of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, a fellow of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots, a fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society, and serves on the board of directors of the Air Force Association. Mr. Muellner retired from the Boeing Company in February of 2008 where he served as president of Advanced Systems for the Integrated Defense Systems business unit with responsibility for developing advanced concepts and technologies, and executing new programs prior to them reaching the system design and development phase. Before this assignment, Mr. Muellner was vice president and general manager of Air Force Systems where he was responsible for all domestic and international Air Force programs. He was appointed to this position in July 2002. Before that, Mr. Muellner became president of Phantom Works, Boeing's advanced research and development unit. in June 2001, after serving as vice president and general manager. Before that, he served 31 years in the U.S. Air Force, retiring as a lieutenant general from the position of principal deputy for the Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Acquisition in Washington, D.C. From 1993 to 1995, he served as director and program executive officer for the Joint Advanced Strike Technology program, now the Joint Strike Fighter program. In 1992, he became deputy chief of staff for requirements for the Headquarters Air Combat Command at Langley Air Force Base, VA. He later served as mission area director for tactical, command, control and communications, and weapons programs for the Office of the Assistant Secretary of



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 105
Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Natalie W. Crawford, NAE, Co-Chair, is a senior fellow at the RAND Corporation, senior mentor for the USAF Scientific Advisory Board, and member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE). Natalie Crawford has worked at RAND for more than 40 years. She served for nine years as vice president and director of RAND Project AIR FORCE from September 1997 to October 2006. She has deep, substantive technical and operational knowledge and experience in areas such as conventional weapons, attack and surveillance avionics, fighter and bomber aircraft performance, aircraft survivability, electronic combat, theater missile defense, force modernization, space systems and capabilities, and non-kinetic operations. She has been a member of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board since 1988, and was its vice chairman in 1990 and cochairman from 1996 to 1999. In 2006, Mrs. Crawford received the OSD Medal for Exceptional Public Service and a Lifetime Achievement Award from the National Defense Industrial Association's Combat Survivability Division, as well as the RAND Medal for Excellence. In 2003 she received the Air Force Analytic Community's Lifetime Achievement Award and the Vance R. Wanner Memorial Award from the Military Operations Research Society. In addition, she received the Department of the Air Force Decoration for Exceptional Civilian Service in 1995 and again in 2003. Mrs. Crawford has a bachelor’s in mathematics from UCLA where she also pursued graduate study in applied mathematics and engineering. George K. Muellner, Co-Chair, is a fellow and president of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, a fellow of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots, a fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society, and serves on the board of directors of the Air Force Association. Mr. Muellner retired from the Boeing Company in February of 2008 where he served as president of Advanced Systems for the Integrated Defense Systems business unit with responsibility for developing advanced concepts and technologies, and executing new programs prior to them reaching the system design and development phase. Before this assignment, Mr. Muellner was vice president and general manager of Air Force Systems where he was responsible for all domestic and international Air Force programs. He was appointed to this position in July 2002. Before that, Mr. Muellner became president of Phantom Works, Boeing's advanced research and development unit. in June 2001, after serving as vice president and general manager. Before that, he served 31 years in the U.S. Air Force, retiring as a lieutenant general from the position of principal deputy for the Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Acquisition in Washington, D.C. From 1993 to 1995, he served as director and program executive officer for the Joint Advanced Strike Technology program, now the Joint Strike Fighter program. In 1992, he became deputy chief of staff for requirements for the Headquarters Air Combat Command at Langley Air Force Base, VA. He later served as mission area director for tactical, command, control and communications, and weapons programs for the Office of the Assistant Secretary of 105

OCR for page 105
106 Examination of the U.S. Air Force’s STEM Workforce Needs the Air Force for Acquisition. Mr. Muellner is a highly decorated veteran who spent most of his career as a fighter pilot and fighter weapons instructor, test pilot and commander. He flew combat missions in Vietnam and commanded the Joint STARS deployment during Operation Desert Storm. Mr. Muellner holds a bachelor’s degree in aeronautical and astronautical engineering from the University of Illinois, a master’s degree in aeronautical systems management from the University of Southern California, a master’s degree in engineering from California State University and a master’s degree in business administration from Auburn University. He also completed the Air War College and the Defense Systems Management College. William P. Ard is senior vice president of the National Defense Division for Point One, Inc. He provides on-site senior level leadership and program support to the National Security Agency in the areas of corporate strategic planning, performance management, corporate governance processes, work role development, and alignment with intelligence community and Department of Defense processes and goals. Mr. Ard is currently involved in work supporting the national efforts to develop and employ cyber-related practices and resources. Before that, Mr. Ard served as the first director of workforce plans and resources for the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, helping to develop the workforce structure and attributes needed to enable and support the 16 federal agencies that make up the intelligence community. Mr. Ard is a retired Brigadier General from the United States Air Force and last served as the director of manpower and organization at Air Force Headquarters where he oversaw the Air Force manpower, organization, and corporate performance management processes. He served in manpower and personnel positions at all levels of the Air Force throughout his career, as well as multiple command billets, culminating in wing command and Air Force Forces command in a Joint Task Force. Mr. Ard received a master of science degree in management from Troy State University in Troy, Alabama, as well as a bachelor of science degree in public administration from Virginia Tech. He is also a graduate of the national security management course at the Maxwell School at Syracuse University and of the Industrial College of the armed forces. James B. Armor, Jr. is currently owner and CEO of The Armor Group, LLC, VA, a consultant to industry and government for space systems development, operations, and strategic planning. Mr. Armor also serves on the Board of Integral Systems, Inc., and NAVSYS Corporation. He is an associate fellow of American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Major General Armor retired from the Air Force in 2008 as Director of the National Security Space Office (NSSO) of the Office of the Under Secretary of the Air Force in Washington, D.C., where he was responsible for integrating and coordinating defense and intelligence space planning, acquisition, and operational activities. Before serving with NSSO, he was director of signals intelligence systems acquisition and operations at the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO), vice commander of the Warner Robins Air Logistics Center at Robins Air Force Base in Georgia, and program director of the Global Positioning System (GPS) at the Space and Missile Systems Center at Los Angeles Air Force Base in California. General Armor was commissioned in 1973 through the ROTC program at Lehigh University in Bethlehem, PA. He served as a combat crew missile launch officer, laser signal intelligence analyst, satellite launch system integrator, and space program manager. Mr. Armor trained as a space shuttle payload specialist, and studied information warfare while a research fellow at the National War College. He also served at the Air Force Headquarters in the Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Plans and Operations and in the Office of the Secretary of the Air Force for Acquisition. Earl H. Dowell, NAE, is an elected member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the American Academy of Mechanics, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). He is also an

OCR for page 105
Appendix A 107 honorary fellow of the AIAA, a recipient of the Crichlow Trust Prize, and was named a Von Karman Lecturer. He is a recipient of the Spirit of St. Louis Medal from ASME and the Guggenheim Medal from the AIAA, ASME, AHS and SAE. He also served as vice president for publications and member of the executive committee of the board of directors of the AIAA; member of the United States Air Force Scientific Advisory Board; member of the Air Force Studies Board; member of the AGARD (NATO) advisory panel for aerospace engineering; president of the American Academy of Mechanics; chair of the US National Committee on Theoretical and Applied Mechanics; and chairman of the National Council of Deans of Engineering. Dr. Dowell currently serves on the boards of visitors of Carnegie Mellon University, Georgia Institute of Technology, Princeton University, the University of Illinois and the University of Rochester. He is an occasional consultant to government, industry and universities in science and technology policy and engineering education as well as his research topics. Dr. Dowell received his bachelors of science degree from the University of Illinois and his S.M. and Sc.D. degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Before serving as Dean of the School of Engineering at Duke University, he taught at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (M.I.T.) and Princeton. Richard P. Hallion is currently a Verville fellow in aeronautics for the National Air and Space Museum of the Smithsonian Institution. Before becoming a Verville fellow, Dr. Hallion was senior advisor for air and space issues in the Directorate for Security, Counterintelligence and Special Programs Oversight. Dr. Hallion holds a BA and PhD from the University of Maryland. He is also the author and editor of over fifteen books on aerospace technology, air war and air doctrine. Michael A. Hamel is retired Commander, Space and Missile Systems Center for the Air Force Space Command at the Los Angeles Air Force Base in California. General Hamel was responsible for managing the research, design, development, acquisition and sustainment of space and missile systems, launch, command and control, and operational satellite systems. He was responsible for more than 6,500 employees nationwide and an annual total budget in excess of $10 billion. General Hamel was the Air Force program executive officer for space and was responsible for the Air Force Satellite Control Network; space launch and range programs; the space-based infrared system program; military satellite communication programs; the global positioning system; intercontinental ballistic missile programs; defense meteorological satellite program; the space superiority system programs; and other emerging transformational space programs. General Hamel was commissioned as second lieutenant through the U.S. Air Force Academy in June 1972. Ray M. Haynes is director of university strategic alliances for the Northrop Grumman Corporation’s Corporate Programs, Engineering and Technology Office. He works with 100+ universities worldwide to coordinate R&D funding totaling more than $50 Million annually and other strategic alliances across the broad university community. He is also Founding Dean for the NG SPACE University and chairs the NG Native American Caucus. Before his current assignment, Dr. Haynes served in a number of key engineering, executive and project management roles, including positions with RCA, TRW, Hewlett-Packard and the US Navy’s Surface Warfare Center. For 15 years in the academic world, Dr. Haynes’ positions have included adjunct professor at Arizona State University and TRW Chaired professor/director of the graduate engineering management program at California Polytechnic University at San Luis Obispo. During his career, Dr. Haynes has published and/or presented 100+ articles, case studies and papers on engineering management, service operations, systems engineering, university corporate relations and technology leadership. He has extensive advisory board participation with ASU

OCR for page 105
108 Examination of the U.S. Air Force’s STEM Workforce Needs Polytechnic, University of Arizona, Cal Polys, Cal Tech, LMU, MIT, Stanford, UC Riverside and UT Pan Am. Dr. Haynes is a frequent guest lecturer at these schools in addition to others like Michigan University, Naval Post Graduate School, Purdue University, UCF and US Air Force Academy. Service to the professional community includes ASEE (past PIC-V Chair/board, CMC director, CIP director, Diversity SIG), ABET (industry advisory council plus PEV), NSF (Corporate Alliance and proposal reviewer), NAE (GUIRR with CalTech, NRC-NASA Workforce Study and upcoming NRC-AF Workforce Study), and National Board service to EPICS and PLTW. Dr. Haynes is active in the diversity community with AISES (corporate advisory council, Executive Excellence Award-2006), HENAAC (industry advisory board), and NAMEPA (president’s advisor) and is a lifetime member of MESA, SACNAS, and SHPE. As the chair of the ASEE CMC Diversity Special Interest Group, he has worked to ensure more communication and collaboration across the professional diversity organizations. Dr. Haynes’ degrees include a BS in Aerospace engineering, an MBA from the University of Arizona, a MS in systems engineering from the RCA Computer Institute, and a Ph.D. in operations logistics from Arizona State University. His education was supported by an NSF Scholar Award, Rotary International, AiResearch Fellowship, RCA Fellowship, Native American Graduate Scholar and TRW Fellowship. Leon A. Johnson is currently a manager and check pilot for United Parcel Service (UPS) flight operations. General Johnson retired from the U.S. Air Force with the rank of brigadier general after 33 years of service. During his Air Force career, General Johnson commanded an Air Force Fighter Squadron, Fighter Group, was the vice commander of 10th Air Force and served as the mobilization assistant to the Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Manpower and Reserve Affairs. In that role he advised senior Air Force leadership on outreach, marketing, retention and recruiting initiatives. He also served as the chair of the Air Force Reserve Command (AFRC) Human Resources Development Council (HRDC). As the chair of the HRDC, General Johnson was the principal staff officer responsible for formulating and administering policies and programs and affecting AFRC people programs including outreach and retention initiatives, in concert with other Air Force Reserve Staff agencies,. He is a command pilot with over 3500 hours of flying time in the T-37 trainer, A-37 and A-10 fighter aircraft, including missions over Bosnia in support of Operation Deny Flight. Following the events of 9/11, the general served as a director of the Air Force Crisis Action Team in the Pentagon. General Johnson is a member of the Air Force Association, Military Officers Association of America, Military Order of World Wars, Veterans of Foreign Wars, Reserve Officers Association, League of United Latin American Citizens, Women in Aviation, the International Black Aerospace Council, Incorporated, and sits on the board of advisors of the Southern Illinois University School of Aviation. General Johnson is a member of the National Academies of Science and Engineering and the Naval Studies Board. He was also a committee member of a report titled, “Manpower and Personnel Needs of a Transformed Naval Force.” Lester McFawn is director of the Wright Brothers Institute in Dayton, Ohio. The Wright Brothers Institute enables world-class research, development and technology transfer in areas of high interest to the Air Force and the Dayton region. Before that he was a member of the federal government’s Senior Executive Service, serving in key Air Force leadership positions in aerospace research, development and acquisition. Until January 2008 he was Executive Director of the Air Force Research Laboratory. In this position, he led the Air Force’s $3.7 billion science and technology program; 10 R&D business units with global operations; and a workforce of 9,900 of the world’s top scientists, engineers and support staff. He held director positions with responsibility for policy, strategic and organizational planning, manpower, and out-year budget development for the Air Armament Center, a $1.5 billion and 4,000 person enterprise; and the Air

OCR for page 105
Appendix A 109 Force Materiel Command, a $45 billion and 78,000 person enterprise. As director of the Sensors Directorate of the Air Force Research Laboratory, he had responsibility for the Air Force’s total science and technology program in sensors and electronics. Mr. McFawn holds a masters degree in computer, information and control engineering from the University of Michigan, and a masters degree in electronics engineering from Florida State University. He has received numerous awards including the Outstanding Civilian Career Service Award, Presidential Rank Award for Meritorious Executive, and Defense Acquisition Executive Certificate of Achievement. Michael C. McMahan is the president and CEO of the Abilene Chamber of Commerce. His responsibilities include the development and promotion of the economy by expanding and retaining businesses and attracting outside investments. He is also responsible for the Industrial Foundation and Abilene Chamber Foundation. He is a member of the Abilene Advisory Board of Cisco Junior College and the West Central Texas Workforce Development Board. Mr. McMahan authored “Five Stages of Leadership,” a presentation on change management of senior leadership. His background includes 32 years of service with the United States Air Force. He has been a commander five times and has had staff tours in the Pentagon and various headquarters at home and abroad. He has over 10 years staff and leadership experience in Air Force manpower, organization and personnel development. He is a native of Dallas, Texas and is a graduate of Texas Tech University with a degree in mechanical engineering. He has a master of science degree from the Air Force Institute of Technology at Arizona State University in the area of industrial engineering operations research. Donald L. Peterson is retired from the US Air Force where he served as deputy chief of staff for personnel at Air Force Headquarters. He was responsible for comprehensive plans and policies covering all life cycles of military and civilian personnel management, including end strength management, education and training, compensation, and resource allocation. Following his retirement from active duty, he was selected to serve as the president and CEO of the Air Force Association for a five-year term. In 1966, Mr. Peterson graduated from Texas A&M University with a degree in finance. He completed pilot training in 1967 and later completed a masters degree in management from Auburn University. He participated in executive development programs at Carnegie-Mellon and Harvard Universities. He commanded a tactical fighter squadron, a tactical fighter wing, a flying training wing, and the North American Aerospace Defense Command and US Space Command at Cheyenne Mountain Operations Center. His staff assignments include the chief of U.S. Air Force operations assignments, a major command inspector general, the director of plans and operations at Air Education and Training Command, the director of plans at Air Force Headquarters, and assistant deputy chief of staff for Air and Space Operations at Air Force Headquarters. He is a command pilot, having flown more than 4,000 hours, including 597 combat hours. Leif E. Peterson (Resigned 7/14, 2009) is managing partner for Advanced HR Concepts and Solutions. Before retiring in December 2007, Leif Peterson was a member of the Senior Executive Service and the director of Manpower, Personnel and Services for the Air Force Materiel Command at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio. He provided executive management of the command's nearly 80,000 military and civilian professionals throughout the United States and overseas in research facilities, test sites, universities, and at product development, logistics and specialized centers. The function of the Directorate of Manpower of Personnel and Services was to shape the AFMC workforce to deliver war-winning expeditionary capabilities and provide oversight, direction and control for all personnel activities within AFMC. Mr. Peterson entered federal service in 1971 as a labor relations specialist at the U.S. Air Force

OCR for page 105
110 Examination of the U.S. Air Force’s STEM Workforce Needs Headquarters. He held numerous positions as a civilian personnel officer, serving two tours at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida., and six years overseas. In 1983, Mr. Peterson became deputy director of civilian personnel for Air Force Systems Command at Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland. He later returned to U.S. Air Force Headquarters as chief of staffing of development and equal employment opportunity. For eight years he was director of civilian personnel at Tactical Air Command and Air Combat Command at Langley Air Force Base in Virginia. He was then assigned as director of civilian personnel and programs at AFMC. He was appointed to the Senior Executive Service in May 2004 assuming his previous position as deputy director of personnel. Albert A. Robbert is director of manpower, personnel and training program for the RAND Project Air Force in Washington, DC. In this role he researches and develops policy alternatives regarding human resource and human capital development. He also coordinates and manages the manpower, personnel and training research agenda within Project Air Force. Before joining the RAND research staff in 1994, Dr. Robbert served for 27 years in the United States Air Force, having personnel management responsibilities at the Air Staff, the Air Force Personnel Center, and several major commands. Dr. Robbert holds a doctorate in public administration from the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. Paula E. Stephan is professor of economics of the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies at Georgia State University and a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. Her research interests focus on the careers of scientists and engineers and the process by which knowledge moves across institutional boundaries in the economy. Dr. Stephan was recently appointed to serve a four-year term on the National Advisory General Medical Sciences Council of the National Institutes of Health, and currently serves on the advisory committee of the social, behavioral, and economics program of the National Science Foundation. She was a member of the European Commission High-Level Expert Group that authored the report Frontier Research: The European Challenge. She has served on National Research Council committees including the Committee on Dimensions, Causes, and Implications of Recent Trends in the Careers of Life Scientists, Committee on Methods of Forecasting Demand and Supply of Doctoral Scientists and Engineers, and the Committee on Policy Implications of International Graduate Students and Postdoctoral Scholars in the United States. Her research has been supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and the National Science Foundation. Dr. Stephan graduated from Grinnell College (Phi Beta Kappa) with a bachelors degree in economics, and earned a masters degree and Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan. She has published more than 80 articles and book chapters. Her articles have appeared in journals such as the Science, American Economic Review, the Journal of Economic Literature, Economic Inquiry, and Social Studies of Science. She co-authored Striking the Mother Lode in Science: The Importance of Age, Place and Time and recently co-edited Science and the University. Dr. Stephan has lectured extensively in Europe. Periodically from 1992 to 1995, Dr. Stephan was a visiting scholar at the Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin fur Sozialforschung in Berlin, a visiting scholar at Katholieke Universiteit Leuven in Belgium in 2005, and in 2008, a visiting scholar at Politecnico di torino in Italy. Todd I. Stewart was appointed to the position of director of the office of institutional partnerships at Michigan Technological University in September 2008. He is responsible for building partnerships between the university and government- and non-government organizations of all types. Before his current position, he served for six years as director of national security research and education programs at Ohio State University. At Ohio State, he was responsible for promoting research and study in all areas of national security, including defense, intelligence,

OCR for page 105
Appendix A 111 foreign relations, international development and homeland security. He also served as the executive director of the National Academic Consortium for Homeland Security. Dr Stewart is an adjunct assistant professor of national security affairs with The John Glenn School of Public Affairs at Ohio State. In September 2006, the United States Senate confirmed President George W. Bush’s nomination of Dr. Stewart to serve a four-year appointment as a member of the National Security Education Board. This group directs the National Security Education Program, establish in law in 1991 to promote national security through the study of international issues and languages. Before his appointment at Ohio State, he served for 34 years with the United States Air Force. His military career included numerous command and staff assignments in positions responsible for strategic planning, combat engineering and installation management, including infrastructure design and construction, installation operation and maintenance, and environmental protection at Air Force bases in the United States and around the world. While on active duty, he also served as an associate professor of management at the Air Force Institute of Technology. He retired from active service in April 2002 as a major general. General Stewart’s academic education includes a bachelor of science degree in civil engineering from Michigan Technological University, a master of science degree in engineering administration from Southern Methodist University, and a doctor of philosophy degree in management from the University of Nebraska. He is also a graduate of the Air Force Squadron Officer School, the Air Command and Staff College, and the Air War College. He is a member of the Academy of Management, Michigan Technological University’s Academy of Civil and Environmental Engineers, the Society of American Military Engineers and the Air Force Association. Ron Yates is an independent consultant to the aerospace industry. He spent 35 years in the US Air Force. He is a combat fighter pilot and test pilot and has 5,000 flying hours in over 50 different types of aircraft. He has extensive experience in the acquisition business having served as program director of both the F-15 and F-16 system program offices. He was also a Test Wing Commander. He served as Air Force director of tactical programs in the Pentagon, and as deputy assistant secretary of the Air Force for acquisition. He was the Commander of both the Air Force Systems Command and the Air Force Materiel Command, where he was responsible for all Air Force research, development, acquisition policy and logistics. He is a member of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots; a commissioner for the National Research Council Commission on Engineering and Technical Systems; a member of the Ballistic Missile Defense Office Advisory Group; a member of the board of visitors of the National Defense University; and a member of the board of directors of the U.S. Air Force Academy’s Association of Graduates. He is a graduate of the U.S. Air Force Academy and holds a Masters Degree in systems management from the University of Southern California.