STEM-Degreed Civilian Personnel Across the Workforce

Only three civilian occupational series in the Air Force require a STEM degree: Engineering (0800), Physical Sciences (1300), and Mathematics (1500). However, as with STEM-degreed officers, STEM-degreed civilians work in many occupations that do not formally require a STEM degree. Figure 2-3 shows the percentage of civilians with technical degrees in a range of occupational series. Note that the caveat about the difference between “technical degree” and the committee’s definition of a STEM degree applies here as well. Acquisition managers are included in the Business and Industry occupational series.

FIGURE 2-3. Percentage of Civilians with Technical Degrees by Occupational Series. Note that not all technical degrees as defined by this source are STEM degrees. SOURCE: Col. James D. Fisher, Chief, Engineering and Technical Management Division, SAF/AQRE, briefing to the committee on August 28, 2008.

FIGURE 2-3. Percentage of Civilians with Technical Degrees by Occupational Series. Note that not all technical degrees as defined by this source are STEM degrees. SOURCE: Col. James D. Fisher, Chief, Engineering and Technical Management Division, SAF/AQRE, briefing to the committee on August 28, 2008.

PERCEIVED ROLE OF STEM CAPABILITY IN AIR FORCE CORE COMPETENCIES AND THE AIR FORCE STRATEGIC PLAN

Since 2003, the Air Force has had three formally established core competencies: Developing Airmen, Technology-to-Warfighting, and Integrating Operations. These three core competencies are described as “making possible” the Air Force’s six “distinctive capabilities”: Air and Space Superiority, Global Attack, Rapid Global Mobility, Precision Engagement, Information Superiority, and Agile Combat Support. (Jumper, 2003; Krisinger, 2003; USAF, 2009).9 In his commentary on Air and Space Core Competencies for the Chief’s Sight Picture of 15 January

9

From about 1996 until 2003, these six distinctive capabilities had been described as Air Force core competencies (Krisinger, 2003; Tritten, 1997; Ryan and Peters, 2000).



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