Evaluation of Future Strategic and Energy Efficient Options for the U.S. Capitol Power Plant

Committee on the Evaluation of Future Strategic and Energy Efficient Alternatives for the U.S. Capitol Power Plant

Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment

Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences

NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES

THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS

Washington, D.C.
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Evaluation of Future Strategic and Energy Efficient Options for the U.S. Capitol Power Plant Committee on the Evaluation of Future Strategic and Energy Efficient Alternatives for the U.S. Capitol Power Plant Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences

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THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS 500 Fifth Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20001 NOTICE: The project that is the subject of this report was approved by the Governing Board of the National Research Council, whose members are drawn from the councils of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine. The members of the committee responsible for the report were chosen for their special competences and with regard for appropriate balance. This report was supported by Sponsor A ward No. AOCO8P1618 between the National Academy of Sciences and the Office of the Architect of the Capitol. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the organizations or agencies that provided support for the project. International Standard Book Number-13: 978-0-309-14202-1 International Standard Book Number-10: 0-309-14202-4 A limited number of copies of this report are available free of charge from: Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment National Research Council 500 Fifth Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20001 (202) 334-1487 Additional copies of this report are available from the National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Lockbox 285, Washington, DC 20055; (800) 624-6242 or (202) 334-3313 (in the Washington metropolitan area); Internet, http://www.nap.edu . Copyright 2009 by the National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America

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The National Academy of Sciences is a private, nonprofit, self-perpetuating society of distinguished scholars engaged in scientific and engineering research, dedicated to the furtherance of science and technology and to their use for the general welfare. Upon the authority of the charter granted to it by the Congress in 1863, the Academy has a mandate that requires it to advise the federal government on scientific and technical matters. Dr. Ralph J. Cicerone is president of the National Academy of Sciences. The National Academy of Engineering was established in 1964, under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences, as a parallel organization of outstanding engineers. It is autonomous in its administration and in the selection of its members, sharing with the National Academy of Sciences the responsibility for advising the federal government. The National Academy of Engineering also sponsors engineering programs aimed at meeting national needs, encourages education and research, and recognizes the superior achievements of engineers. Dr. Charles M. Vest is president of the National Academy of Engineering. The Institute of Medicine was established in 1970 by the National Academy of Sciences to secure the services of eminent members of appropriate professions in the examination of policy matters pertaining to the health of the public. The Institute acts under the responsibility given to the National Academy of Sciences by its congressional charter to be an adviser to the federal government and, upon its own initiative, to identify issues of medical care, research, and education. Dr. Harvey V. Fineberg is president of the Institute of Medicine. The National Research Council was organized by the National Academy of Sciences in 1916 to associate the broad community of science and technology with the Academy’s purposes of furthering knowledge and advising the federal government. Functioning in accordance with general policies determined by the Academy, the Council has become the principal operating agency of both the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering in providing services to the government, the public, and the scientific and engineering communities. The Council is administered jointly by both Academies and the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Ralph J. Cicerone and Dr. Charles M. Vest are chair and vice chair, respectively, of the National Research Council. www.national-academies.org

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COMMITTEE ON THE EV ALUATION OF FUTURE STRATEGIC AND ENERGY EFFICIENT ALTERNATIVES FOR THE U.S. CAPITOL POWER PLANT STEVEN J. FENVES, Chair, Emeritus University Professor, Carnegie Mellon University, Rockville, Maryland CARMINE BA TTAFARANO, Burns and Roe Services Corporation ROY BILLINTON, University of Saskatchewan BRENDA MYERS BOHLKE, Myers Bohlke Enterprise, LLC RA YMOND E. DUBOSE, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill PETER H. EMMONS, Structural Preservation Systems JUAN M. ONTIVEROS, University of Texas, Austin ALAN S. SHIMADA, ENVIRON International Corporation C.B. (BOB) TA TUM, Stanford University Project Staff L YNDA STANLEY , Study Director, Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment HEA THER LOZOWSKI, Financial Associate, Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment TERI THOROWGOOD, Administrative Coordinator, Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment v

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BOARD ON INFRASTRUCTURE AND THE CONSTRUCTED ENVIRONMENT DA VID J. NASH, Chair, Dave Nash and Associates JESUS de la GARZA, Virginia Tech BRIAN ESTES, U.S. Navy (retired), Williamsburg, Virginia LUCIA GARSYS, Hillsborough County, Florida THEODORE C. KENNEDY , BE&K, Inc. (retired), Birmingham, Alabama PETER MARSHALL, Dewberry Company (retired), Norfolk, Virginia JAMES PORTER, E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company (retired), Wilmington, Delaware E. SARAH SLAUGHTER, Massachusetts Institute of Technology WILLIAM W ALLACE, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Staff GARY FISCHMAN, Director L YNDA STANLEY , Senior Program Officer KEVIN LEWIS, Senior Program Officer HEA THER LOZOWSKI, Financial Associate TERI THOROWGOOD, Administrative Coordinator LAURA TOTH, Program Assistant The Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment (BICE) was established by the National Research Council (NRC) in 1946 as the Building Research Advisory Board. BICE brings together experts from a wide range of scientific, engineering, and social science disciplines to discuss potential studies of interest, develop and frame study tasks, ensure proper project planning, suggest possible reviewers for reports produced by fully independent ad hoc study committees, and convene meetings to examine strategic issues. The Board members were not asked to endorse the conclusions or recommendations of the Committee on the Evaluation of Future Strategic and Energy Efficient Alternatives for the U.S. Capitol Power Plant. Additional information about BICE can be obtained online at http://www.nationalacademies.org/bice . vi

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Acknowledgments The authoring committee acknowledges the significant contributions made by all of the workshop participants, who willingly and enthusiastically volunteered their time and ideas. This report has been reviewed in draft form by individuals chosen for their diverse perspectives and technical expertise, in accordance with procedures approved by the National Research Council’s Report Review Committee. The purpose of this independent review is to provide candid and critical comments that will assist the institution in making its published report as sound as possible and to ensure that the report meets institutional standards for objectivity, evidence, and responsiveness to the study charge. The review comments and draft manuscript remain confidential to protect the integrity of the deliberative process. W e thank the following individuals for their review of this report: Lionel Barthold, Power Technologies, Inc. (retired), Daniel Coyle, Thermal Engineering Group, Inc., James Markowsky, American Electric Power Service Corporation (retired), Robert McKim, Trenchless Technology Center, Louisiana Tech, Get Moy, AECOM, David Skiven, General Motors Worldwide Facilities Group (retired), Amanda Staudt, National Wildlife Foundation, Stanley Suboleski, Consultant, Michael Telson, University of California. Although the reviewers listed above have provided many constructive comments and suggestions, they were not asked to endorse the conclusions or recommendations, nor did they see the final draft of the report before its release. The review of this report was overseen by Chris G. Whipple, ENVIRON International Corporation. Appointed by the National Research Council, he was responsible for making certain that an independent examination of this report was carried out in accordance with institutional procedures and that all review comments were carefully considered. Responsibility for the final content of this report rests entirely with the authoring committee and the institution. vii

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Contents SUMMARY 1 1 INTRODUCTION 5 Statement of Task, 9 The Committee’s Approach, 9 2 EV ALUA TION OF CONSULTANT-GENERA TED OPTIONS 11 Strengths Identified by the Committee, 11 Shortcomings Identified by the Committee, 12 Additional W ork Recommended, 17 3 RECOMMENDED ADDITIONAL ANAL YSES 21 Reliability and Risk Assessments, 21 Comparative Demand and Supply Projections, 22 Workforce Demand Evaluation, 23 Exploration of Wider Range of Technologies, 23 Benchmarking, 24 Response to Shortcomings Identified, 24 REFERENCES 25 APPENDIXES A Biosketches of Committee Members 29 B Biosketches of Participants Invited to the Capitol Power Plant Workshop 33 C Committee Meetings and Agendas 35 D Sample Format for Benchmarking Data 37 ix

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