Appendix B
Biosketches of Participants Invited to Capitol Power Plant Workshop

Get W. Moy is the associate vice president and senior program director for federal projects for DMJM H&N, a global design, management, and technical services firm. Prior to joining DMJM H&N, Dr. Moy served as an engineer for various sectors of the federal government, including the Naval Facilities Engineering Command and the Department of Defense. As director of utilities and energy, Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense (Installations and Environment), he was responsible for DOD's energy program, offering insight on issues such as security of the utility infrastructure, the role of distributed generation and renewable energy, fluctuations in energy prices, energy and water resource management, utility acquisition, and utilities privatization. As the director of installations requirements and management at the DOD, he was responsible for the administration and direction of installations worldwide. Dr. Moy has managed complex programs for the federal government, including projects with stringent energy and environmental mandates. His expertise includes program and construction management, and sustainable design and management.


Christopher T . Payne is a scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory who is currently involved with the Green the Capitol Initiative. His research interests and expertise include energy consumption decision making, energy consumption and comprehension in the small business sector, qualitative analysis of energy consumption behavior, common conceptions of energy use and environmental issues, environmental identity in the work environment, organizational culture and its effect on environmental values, global climate change, energy conservation, and environmental protection.


Rush D. Robinett III is senior manager of the Energy and Infrastructure Future Group at Sandia National Laboratories. His multidisciplinary team of scientists and engineers develops and implements new concepts in renewable and clean energy, transitional fuels, advanced power electronics and energy storage, and controls and communications for the future electric generation and distribution system. In January 2008 he was a team member of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change scoping committee on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change.


David A. Skiven is a facilities management consultant and frequent advisor to federal agencies, including the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Air Force. He is also currently serving as co-director of the Engineering Society of Detroit Institute, a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving Michigan’s economy. Mr. Skiven retired as the executive director of the General Motors Corporation Worldwide Facilities Group in 2007. The Worldwide Facilities Group was responsible for providing facilities management, utilities, construction, and environmental segments, allowing General Motors’ clients to focus on their core business, resulting in structural cost savings and improved utilization of assets. In 42 years at GM, Mr. Skiven worked in various engineering and plant operations, including manager of Facilities and Future Programs-Manufacturing Engineering for the Saturn Corporation, and director of Plant Environment and the Environmental Energy Staff before being appointed executive director of the Worldwide



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Appendix B Biosketches of Participants Invited to Capitol Power Plant Workshop Get W. Moy is the associate vice president and senior program director for federal projects for DMJM H&N, a global design, management, and technical services firm. Prior to joining DMJM H&N, Dr. Moy served as an engineer for various sectors of the federal government, including the Naval Facilities Engineering Command and the Department of Defense. As director of utilities and energy, Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense (Installations and Environment), he was responsible for DOD's energy program, offering insight on issues such as security of the utility infrastructure, the role of distributed generation and renewable energy, fluctuations in energy prices, energy and water resource management, utility acquisition, and utilities privatization. As the director of installations requirements and management at the DOD, he was responsible for the administration and direction of installations worldwide. Dr. Moy has managed complex programs for the federal government, including projects with stringent energy and environmental mandates. His expertise includes program and construction management, and sustainable design and management. Christopher T. Payneis a scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory who is currently involved with the Green the Capitol Initiative. His research interests and expertise include energy consumption decision making, energy consumption and comprehension in the small business sector, qualitative analysis of energy consumption behavior, common conceptions of energy use and environmental issues, environmental identity in the work environment, organizational culture and its effect on environmental values, global climate change, energy conservation, and environmental protection. Rush D. Robinett III is senior manager of the Energy and Infrastructure Future Group at Sandia National Laboratories. His multidisciplinary team of scientists and engineers develops and implements new concepts in renewable and clean energy, transitional fuels, advanced power electronics and energy storage, and controls and communications for the future electric generation and distribution system. In January 2008 he was a team member of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change scoping committee on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change. David A. Skiven is a facilities management consultant and frequent advisor to federal agencies, including the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Air Force. He is also currently serving as co-director of the Engineering Society of Detroit Institute, a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving Michigan’s economy. Mr. Skiven retired as the executive director of the General Motors Corporation W orldwide Facilities Group in 2007. The Worldwide Facilities Group was responsible for providing facilities management, utilities, construction, and environmental segments, allowing General Motors’ clients to focus on their core business, resulting in structural cost savings and improved utilization of assets. In 42 years at GM, Mr. Skiven worked in various engineering and plant operations, including manager of Facilities and Future Programs- Manufacturing Engineering for the Saturn Corporation, and director of Plant Environment and the Environmental Energy Staff before being appointed executive director of the W orldwide 33

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Facilities Group in 1993. He has served as a member of the NRC’s Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment, on the board of directors of BioReaction, Inc., and on the board of the Engineering Society of Detroit. Mr. Skiven has a BS degree in mechanical engineering from General Motors Institute (GMI) and an MS degree from Wayne State University. He is also a registered Professional Engineer. Raymond L. Sterling is the former director of the Trenchless Technology Center at Louisiana Tech University. The primary goal of TTC is to provide international leadership in trenchless technology activities that enhance construction productivity, environmental improvement, and rehabilitation of the infrastructure. The specific objectives of the center are to conduct basic and applied research for industry and government agencies; assist industries in developing, marketing, and manufacturing new products; promote technology transfer within the industry; establish and disseminate standard guidelines and specifications; monitor proposed regulations that impact the industry; develop contractor, designer, and inspector certification programs; and provide liaison with related trade and professional organizations. 34