FIGURE 1.2 Map of the U.S. Capitol Complex. (The Capitol Power Plant is at the bottom of the map, north of the CSX railroad tracks, and the coal yard is south of the railroad tracks.) SOURCE: AOC Web site.

FIGURE 1.2 Map of the U.S. Capitol Complex. (The Capitol Power Plant is at the bottom of the map, north of the CSX railroad tracks, and the coal yard is south of the railroad tracks.) SOURCE: AOC Web site.

year to generate the steam and chilled water required to heat and cool these buildings and related equipment. Steam and chilled water in turn are distributed to the individual buildings through utility lines contained within more than 3 miles of tunnels and trenches located beneath city streets and neighborhoods.2

Originally built in 1909 to supply steam and electricity3 to the U.S. Capitol, the CPP has been expanded in a decades-long process to provide utility services to about 19 million square feet of space, including the Government Printing Office and Union Station4 (Figure 1.3).

the Library of Congress buildings, the Supreme Court building, the U.S. Botanic Garden, the Capitol Power Plant, and other facilities.

2

The tunnels also carry other utilities, including fiber optic and telephone lines.

3

The CPP stopped producing electricity in the 1950s; electricity is now supplied to the U.S. Capitol Complex by the Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO).

4

The Government Printing Office and Union Station are not part of the U.S. Capitol Complex per se, but they are served by the CPP district energy system.



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