A
Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

JOSEPH N. PATO, Chair, is Distinguished Technologist at Hewlett-Packard’s HP Laboratories. Previously he served as chief technology officer for Hewlett-Packard’s Internet Security Solutions Division. He is currently a visiting fellow with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab Decentralized Information Group (DIG). Since 1986, Mr. Pato has been involved in security research and development, studying authentication, identification, and privacy issues. Currently Mr. Pato is developing a research program that will analyze security issues in the health care industry. Mr. Pato’s current research focuses on the security needs of collaborative enterprises on the Internet, addressing both interenterprise models and the needs of lightweight instruments and peripherals directly attached to the Internet. Specifically, he is looking at critical infrastructure protection and the confluence of trust, e-services, and mobility. These interests have led him to look at the preservation of Internet communication in the event of cyberterrorism, trust frameworks for mobile environments, and applying privacy considerations in complex systems. His past work includes the design of delegation protocols for secure distributed computation, key exchange protocols, interdomain trust structures, the development of public- and secret-key-based infrastructures, and the more general development of distributed enterprise environments. Mr. Pato is also a founder of the IT Information Sharing and Analysis Center (IT-ISAC), where he has served



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A Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff COMMITTEE MEMBERS JOSEPH N. PATO, Chair, is Distinguished Technologist at Hewlett- Packard’s HP Laboratories. Previously he served as chief technology officer for Hewlett-Packard’s Internet Security Solutions Division. He is currently a visiting fellow with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab Decentralized Informa - tion Group (DIG). Since 1986, Mr. Pato has been involved in security research and development, studying authentication, identification, and privacy issues. Currently Mr. Pato is developing a research program that will analyze security issues in the health care industry. Mr. Pato’s current research focuses on the security needs of collaborative enterprises on the Internet, addressing both interenterprise models and the needs of light - weight instruments and peripherals directly attached to the Internet. Spe - cifically, he is looking at critical infrastructure protection and the conflu - ence of trust, e-services, and mobility. These interests have led him to look at the preservation of Internet communication in the event of cyberter- rorism, trust frameworks for mobile environments, and applying privacy considerations in complex systems. His past work includes the design of delegation protocols for secure distributed computation, key exchange protocols, interdomain trust structures, the development of public- and secret-key-based infrastructures, and the more general development of distributed enterprise environments. Mr. Pato is also a founder of the IT Information Sharing and Analysis Center (IT-ISAC), where he has served 

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 BIOMETRIC RECOGNITION as a board member. Mr. Pato has participated on several standards or advi- sory committees of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), American National Standards Institute (ANSI), National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST), Department of Commerce, W3C, Financial Services Technology Consortium (FSTC), and Common Open Software Environment (COSE). He has represented Hewlett-Packard to the Open Software Foundation (OSF) Architecture Planning Council, the technical arm of the OSF Board of Directors. He has also served on the Technical Planning Committee evolving the Distributed Computing Environment (DCE) and chaired the Security and Remote Procedure Call (RPC)/Programming Model/Environment Services working groups. He has served as the vice-chair for the Distributed Management Environment (DME)-DCE-Security working group of the OSF Security Special Interest Group. In the past, Mr. Pato served as the co-chair for the OASIS Secu - rity Services Technical Committee, which developed Security Assertions Markup Language (SAML) from June 2001 until November 2002. SAML 1.0 was approved as an OASIS standard on November 1, 2002. Mr. Pato served as a key member of the NRC committee that wrote Who Goes There? Authentication Through the Lens of Priacy (2003). Mr. Pato’s graduate work was in computer science at Brown University. BOB BLAKLEY is vice president and research director for Burton Group Identity and Privacy Strategies. He covers identity, privacy, security, authentication, and risk management. Before joining Burton Group, Dr. Blakley was chief scientist for security and privacy at IBM and served on the National Academy of Sciences’ Committee on Authentication Technologies and Their Privacy Implications. He has served as general chair of the 2003 IEEE Security and Privacy Conference and as general chair of the New Security Paradigms Workshop. Dr. Blakley is the former editor of the Object Management Group Common Object Request Broker Architecture (OMG CORBA) security specification and authored CORBA Security: An Introduction to Safe Computing with Objects , published by Addison-Wesley. He is also editor of Open Group’s Authorization Appli- cation Programming Interface (API) specification effect and currently holds more than 10 patents on security-related technologies. Dr. Blakley received an A.B. in classics from Princeton University and a master’s degree and Ph.D. in computer and communications sciences from the University of Michigan. JEANETTE BLOMBERG is research staff member and program manager for practice-based service innovation at the IBM Almaden Research Cen - ter. Before assuming her current position, Dr. Blomberg was a founding member of the pioneering Work Practice and Technology group at the

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 APPENDIX A Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (PARC), Director of Experience Model - ing Research at Sapient Corporation, and industry-affiliated professor at the Blekinge Institute of Technology in Sweden. Since joining IBM Research she has led projects on interactions among IT service providers and their clients, collaboration practices among globally distributed sales teams, the place of stories in corporate imaginaries, and new approaches to work-based learning. Her research explores issues in social aspects of technology production and use, ethnographically informed organiza - tional interventions, participatory design, case-based prototyping, and service innovation. Dr. Blomberg is an active member of the participatory design community, having served as program co-chair twice, and she sits on a number of advisory boards, including the Foresight panel of the IT University of Copenhagen, the Program in Design Anthropology at Wayne State University, and the Ethnographic Praxis in Industry Confer- ence (EPIC). Dr. Blomberg received her Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of California, Davis; before embarking on her career in high tech, she was a lecturer in cultural anthropology and sociolinguistics at UC Davis. JOSEPH P. CAMPBELL received B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electri- cal engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1979, the Johns Hopkins University in 1986, and Oklahoma State University in 1992, respectively. Dr. Campbell is currently a senior member of the technical staff at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory in the Information Systems Technology Group, where he conducts speech- processing research and specializes in advanced speaker recognition meth- ods. His current interests are high-level features for speaker recognition and forensic-style applications of it, creating corpora to support speech- processing research and evaluation, robust speech coding, biometrics, and cognitive radio. Before joining Lincoln Laboratory, he served 22 years at the National Security Agency (NSA). From 1979 to 1990, Dr. Campbell was a member of NSA’s Narrowband Secure Voice Technology research group. He and his teammates developed the first DSP-chip software modem and LPC-10e, which enhanced the Federal Standard 1015 voice coder and improved U.S. and NATO secure voice systems. He was the princi - pal investigator for the CELP voice coder and led the U.S. government’s speech coding team in developing for it. CELP became Federal Standard 1016 and is the foundation of digital cellular and voice-over-the-Internet telephony systems. From 1991 to 1998, Dr. Campbell was a senior scien- tist in NSA’s Biometric Technology research group, where he led voice verification research. From 1994 to 1998, he chaired the Biometric Consor- tium, the U.S. government’s focal point for research, development, test, evaluation, and application of biometric-based personal identification and

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 BIOMETRIC RECOGNITION verification technology. From 1998 to 2001, he led the Acoustics Section of NSA’s Speech Research branch, conducting and coordinating research on and evaluation of speaker recognition, language identification, gender identification, and speech activity detection methods. From 1991 to 1999, Dr. Campbell was an associate editor of IEEE Transactions on Speech and Audio Processing. He was an IEEE Signal Processing Society Distinguished Lecturer in 2001. From 1991 to 2001, Dr. Campbell taught speech process- ing at the Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Campbell is currently a member of the IEEE Signal Processing Society’s board of governors; an editor of Digital Signal Processing journal; a chair of the International Speech Com- munication Association’s Speaker and Language Characterization Special Interest Group (ISCA SpLC SIG); a member of ISCA, Sigma Xi, and the Acoustical Society of America; and a fellow of the IEEE. GEORGE T. DUNCAN is a professor of statistics, emeritus, in the H. John Heinz III College and the Department of Statistics at Carnegie Mel - lon University. He was on the faculty of the University of California, Davis (1970-1974) and was a Peace Corps volunteer in the Philippines (1965-1967), teaching at Mindanao State University. His current research work centers on statistical confidentiality. He has published more than 70 papers in such journals as Statistical Science, Management Science, Journal of the American Statistical Association, Econometrica, and Psychometrika. He has received National Science Foundation (NSF) research funding and has lectured in Brazil, Cuba, England, Italy, Turkey, Ireland, Mexico, and Japan, among other places. He chaired the Panel on Confidentiality and Data Access of the National Academy of Sciences (1989-1993), producing the report Priate Lies and Public Policies: Confidentiality and Accessibility of Goernment Statistics. He chaired the American Statistical Association’s Committee on Privacy and Confidentiality. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, an elected member of the International Statistical Institute, and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. In 1996 he was elected Pittsburgh Statistician of the Year by the American Statistical Association. He has been editor of the Theory and Methods Section of the Journal of the American Statistical Association. He has been a visiting faculty member at Los Alamos National Laboratory and was the Lord Simon Visiting Professor at the University of Manchester. He received a B.S. (1963) and an M.S. (1964) from the University of Chicago and a Ph.D. (1970) from the University of Minnesota, all in statistics. GEORGE R. FISHER runs both an investment advisory firm, George Fisher Advisors LLC, and a real-estate-development finance company, George Fisher Finance, LLC, in Boston, Massachusetts. He was formerly on the board of directors of Prudential Securities in New York City, where

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 APPENDIX A he led the merger of Prudential Securities into Wachovia. Prior to joining Prudential, Mr. Fisher was chief information officer at Fidelity Invest - ments, where he managed technology oversight, consolidating mutual fund and brokerage platforms. Mr. Fisher also spent 16 years at Morgan Stanley, first as a principal for Technical Services Worldwide, transforming manual, low-volume systems into Wall Street leaders; later, as a managing director, he became the deputy general manager for Morgan Stanley Asia, restructuring Chinese operations and managing the explosive growth of Asia’s regional markets. Mr. Fisher earned a B.A. in economics and com- puter science from the University of Rochester. He has also earned certifi - cations from the National Association of Securities Dealers (Series 3, 7, 63, 24, and 27), the National Association of Corporate Directors (Director of Professionalism), the American Chamber of Commerce in Japan, and the Association of International Education of Japan, earning Level 4 language proficiency. Mr. Fisher is a certified financial planner (CFP). STEVEN P. GOLDBERG was the James and Catherine Denny Professor of Law at the Georgetown University Law Center. An expert in law and science, Mr. Goldberg was the author of Culture Clash: Law and Science in America (1996), winner of the Alpha Sigma Nu Book Award, and coauthor of the widely used text Law, Science, and Medicine. He served as a law clerk to D.C. Circuit Court Chief Judge David L. Bazelon and U.S. Supreme Court Justice William J. Brennan, Jr. He also served as an attorney in the General Counsel’s Office of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Mr. Goldberg was a member of the District of Columbia and Maryland bars and the Section on Science and Technology of the American Bar Associa- tion. He received an A.B. from Harvard College and a J.D. from Yale Law School. He died on August 26, 2010. PETER T. HIGGINS, founder of Higgins & Associates, International, has 41 years’ experience in the information technology field and has been involved with biometrics since the late 1980s. He was a member of the UK Home Office, Identification and Passport Service’s Biometrics Assurance Group (UK BAG) from 2006 through June 2009, when UK BAG’s mission was completed. He was an instructor of biometrics at the University of California, Los Angeles, Extension School for many years. He chaired the International Association for Identification’s AFIS Committee for 5 years and is a well-known consultant and lecturer in the field of large-scale biometric procurement and testing. In 2002 he joined John Woodward and Nick Orlans in authoring the McGraw-Hill/Osborne book Biometric Identification in the Information Age. In 2004 he joined Peter Komarinski, Kathleen Higgins, and Lisa Fox in writing the Elsevier Academic Press book Automated Fingerprint Identification Systems. Previously he served

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 BIOMETRIC RECOGNITION as deputy assistant director of engineering with the FBI and was the program manager for the FBI’s Integrated Automated Fingerprint Iden- tification System (IAFIS). Before that, he served in technical, operational, and executive positions with the Central Intelligence Agency. Mr. Higgins received a B.A. in mathematics from Marist College and an M.S. in theo - retical math and computer science from Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, New Jersey. PETER B. IMREY, a biostatistician and epidemiologist, is a professor of medicine at the Cleveland Clinic, where he holds appointments in the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, the Lerner Research Institute’s Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, and the Neurological Institute’s Mellen Center for Mul - tiple Sclerosis Treatment and Research. He previously taught at the Uni- versity of North Carolina (biostatistics, 1972-1975) and the University of Illinois (medical information science; statistics; and community health, 1975-2002), and is an adjunct professor, Department of Statistics, Uni- versity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Dr. Imrey has made research and expository contributions to statistical analysis of categorical data and diverse health science areas, including meningococcal disease, diet and cancer, and dental data analysis. He has served on editorial boards of three statistical journals and the Encyclopedia of Biostatistics (2nd edi- tion), on numerous federal special study sections and emphasis panels, and on the National Academies’ committee that produced the report The Polygraph and Lie Detection (2003). He has held multiple biostatistical leadership posts in the International Biometric Society (an international society promoting the development and application of statistical and mathematical theory and methods in the biosciences), the American Sta - tistical Association, and the American Public Health Association (APHA). Dr. Imrey has been honored by APHA’s Statistics Section and is a fellow of the American College of Epidemiology and a member of Sigma Xi and Delta Omega honorary societies. He received an A.B. in mathematics and statistics from Columbia University and a Ph.D. in biostatistics from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. ANIL K. JAIN is University Distinguished Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at Michigan State University. His research interests include pattern recognition, exploratory pattern analy - sis, Markov random fields, texture analysis, object recognition, and bio - metric authentication. He received the best paper awards in 1987, 1991, and 2005 and was cited for outstanding contributions in 1976, 1979, 1992, 1997, and 1998 from the Pattern Recognition Society. He also received the 1996 IEEE Transactions on Neural Networks Outstanding Paper Award. He

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 APPENDIX A is a fellow of the IEEE, the ACM, AAAS, SPIE, and the International Asso - ciation of Pattern Recognition (IAPR). He was editor in chief of the IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence (1991-1994). He has received a Fulbright Research Award, a Guggenheim fellowship, the Alexander von Humboldt Research Award, the IEEE Computer Society Wallace McDowell award, the King-Sun Fu Prize from IAPR, and the IEEE ICDM Outstanding Research Contribution award. He holds six patents in the area of fingerprint matching and has written a number of books on biometrics, including Handbook of Biometrics, Handbook of Multibiometrics, Handbook of Face Recognition, and Handbook of Fingerprint Recognition. He is a member of the Defense Science Board and served on the National Academies Committee on Improvised Explosive Devices. Dr. Jain was the co-organizer of the NSF workshop on the biometrics research agenda, held in May 2003, and has organized several conferences on biometrics. He received a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Ohio State University in 1973. GORDON LEVIN is senior engineer with the Advanced Systems group of Design and Engineering at Walt Disney World in Orlando, Florida, where the world’s largest commercial biometric application has been operating since 1997. As a licensed electrical engineer, he is the engineer of record for all physical security system design performed on the 42- square-mile property. Mr. Levin has been a member of the Biometric Consortium Working Group (BCWG) since 1999 and the sole commercial end user to be a participating representative acting under NIST and the NSA to incubate biometric standards for submission to ANSI and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). In 2002 he was the keynote speaker at the plenary meeting of ISO/IEC Joint Technical Com- mittee 1 Subcommittee 37 on Biometrics. He also participated in the Avia - tion Security–Biometrics Working Group, which was assembled in the wake of 9/11 to report on passenger protection and identity verification. This report was instrumental in the strategic planning for the soon-to- be-formed Transportation Security Administration (TSA) and its plans for adopting biometric technology. Prior to joining Walt Disney World in 1997, Mr. Levin had been a private consultant engineer working in the DOD and commercial sectors in specialized security and electronic system design and construction. LAWRENCE D. NADEL is a fellow in the Center for National Security and Intelligence, Identity Discovery and Management Division at Noblis. With more than 15 years’ experience in biometrics, he has focused on the requirements for implementing effective and interoperable biometric sys- tems and issues associated with it, objective methods for testing and evalu-

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 BIOMETRIC RECOGNITION ating the performance of these systems, and means for assessing biometric sample quality. Dr. Nadel currently leads Noblis’s Biometrics Support Services Program for the Department of Homeland Security (DHS)/US- VISIT. He contributed to US-VISIT’s conversion from 2-prints to 10-prints, helped strategize innovative solutions to biometric verification of non-U.S. citizens departing the U.S., and is supporting US-VISIT’s implementation of multibiometrics and standards-based data sharing. He has provided technical leadership to other national identification and security-related projects for the FBI, TSA, DOD, and the National Institute of Justice. Dr. Nadel was co-principal investigator for a 2-year Noblis-funded research project investigating approaches to multi-biometric fusion. He has chaired the Noblis Biometric Identification Cluster Group since early 2000 and is a participant in the INCITS-M1 biometrics standards development group and the NIST NVLAP Biometrics Working Group. Dr. Nadel earned a B.S. in electrical engineering from the Polytechnic Institute of NYU and M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical and biomedical engineering from the Ohio State University. JAMES L. WAYMAN is a research administrator in the Office of Graduate Studies and Research at San Jose State University. He served as director of the U.S. National Biometric Test Center in the Clinton administration (1997-2000). He holds four patents in speech processing, is a principal U.K. expert on the ISO/IEC standards committee biometrics, and the edi- tor of the ISO/IEC standard on voice data format. Dr. Wayman is a senior member of the IEEE and a fellow of the IET. He is coeditor of J. Way - man, A. Jain, D. Maltoni and D. Maio, Biometric Systems (Springer, 2005) and was a member of the NRC’s committee that wrote Who Goes There? Authentication Through the Lens of Priacy. He has been a paid biometrics advisor to 8 national governments. Dr. Wayman received his Ph.D. degree in engineering from the University of California, Santa Barbara, in 1980. STAFF LYNETTE I. MILLETT is a senior program officer and study director at the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board, National Research Council of the National Academies. She currently directs several CSTB projects, including a comprehensive exploration of sustaining growth in computing performance and an examination of how best to develop complex, software-intensive systems in the DOD environment. She served as study director for the CSTB reports Social Security Administration Elec- tronic Serice Proision: A Strategic Assessment and Software for Dependable Systems: Sufficient Eidence? Her portfolio includes significant portions of CSTB’s recent work on software, identity systems, and privacy. She

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 APPENDIX A directed the project that produced Who Goes There? Authentication Through the Lens of Priacy, a discussion of authentication technologies and their privacy implications; and IDs—Not That Easy: Questions About Nationwide Identity Systems, a post-9/11 analysis of the challenges presented by large- scale identity systems. She has an M.Sc. in computer science from Cornell University, where her work was supported by graduate fellowships from the NSF and the Intel Corporation; and a B.A. with honors in mathemat - ics and computer science from Colby College, where she was elected to Phi Beta Kappa.