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Appendix B


July 29, 2009, Symposium State and Regional Innovation Initiatives—Partnering for Photovoltaics Manufacturing in the United States

Biographies of Speakers*

CAROL BATTERSHELL

Carol Battershell is the senior advisor for commercialization and deployment in the U.S. Department of Energy’s office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Ms. Battershell joined the Department of Energy in 2008 after 25 years in the energy industry with BP and Standard Oil. As senior advisor for commercialization and deployment, she is responsible for identifying and implementing opportunities to accelerate the commercialization of efficiency and renewable energy technologies in the United States.

Ms. Battershell’s most recent roles at BP included:

• Vice president, policy and strategy for BP Alternative Energy, where she was instrumental in developing the strategy and business case for an 8 billion dollar investment to launch and grow the new BP Alternative Energy division, and

• Vice president, renewables and alternative fuels, where she directed BP's global activities in hydrogen and wind, as well as managed BP's "green energy" marketing and consulting company.

Additional energy industry positions have included operations and strategy roles in retail fuels marketing, strategy and financial roles in business-to-business fuels marketing, as well a corporate role in environmental policy and a development role as chief of staff to one of BP’s most senior executives. She began her career as a refinery engineer in Ohio.

Ms. Battershell has a B.S. in engineering from Purdue University where

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* Biographies as of July 2009, distributed at symposium.



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Appendix B July 29, 2009, Symposium State and Regional Innovation Initiatives— Partnering for Photovoltaics Manufacturing in the United States Biographies of Speakers* CAROL BATTERSHELL Carol Battershell is the senior advisor for commercialization and deployment in the U.S. Department of Energy’s office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Ms. Battershell joined the Department of Energy in 2008 after 25 years in the energy industry with BP and Standard Oil. As senior advisor for commer- cialization and deployment, she is responsible for identifying and implementing opportunities to accelerate the commercialization of efficiency and renewable energy technologies in the United States. Ms. Battershell’s most recent roles at BP included: • Vice president, policy and strategy for BP Alternative Energy, where she was instrumental in developing the strategy and business case for an 8 billion dollar investment to launch and grow the new BP Alternative Energy division, and • Vice president, renewables and alternative fuels, where she directed BP's global activities in hydrogen and wind, as well as managed BP's "green energy" marketing and consulting company. Additional energy industry positions have included operations and strategy roles in retail fuels marketing, strategy and financial roles in business-to-business fuels marketing, as well a corporate role in environmental policy and a develop - ment role as chief of staff to one of BP’s most senior executives. She began her career as a refinery engineer in Ohio. Ms. Battershell has a B.S. in engineering from Purdue University where * Biographies as of July 2009, distributed at symposium. 239

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240 FUTURE OF PHOTOVOLTAICS MANUFACTURING she specialized in environmental engineering and an MBA from Case Western Reserve University. Ms. Battershell has worked in a variety of locations in the United States and has spent 10 years living and working in Europe. RICHARD BENDIS Mr. Bendis currently serves as the founding president and CEO of Innova- tion America (IA), a national 501(c)3 not-for-profit, private/public partnership focused on accelerating the growth of the entrepreneurial innovation economy in America. Mr. Bendis has distinguished himself as a successful entrepreneur, corporate executive, venture capitalist, investment banker, innovation and technology-based economic development leader, international speaker and consultant in the tech - nology and health care industries. Mr. Bendis has been engaged in and appointed to selected national innova- tion related organizations and committees that include the White House U.S. Innovation Partnership (USIP) Advisory Task Force and co-chair of the Small Business Innovation Research Committee, the National Governor’s Association (NGA) Science and Technology Council of the State’s Executive Committee, the State Federal Technology Task Force, the National Academies (NAS) Committee on Competing in the 21st Century: Best Practice in State and Regional Innovation Initiatives; National Academies Review of the SBIR Program; National Insti - tute of Standards and Technology Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP) National Advisory Board; U.S. Small Business Administration’s Angel Capital Electronic Network (ACENET) Board of Directors; American Academy for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Nominating Committee and the American As - sociation Research Competitiveness Program Advisory Committee; Council on Competitiveness—Clusters of Innovation Committee. Mr. Bendis has also served as a board member and representative to the following organizations: National Association of State Venture Funds (NASVF) Founding Board member and Executive Committee member; American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Strategic Innovations and Initiatives Commit- tee; State Science and Technology Institute (SSTI) founding board member and Executive Committee member; Eisenhower Fellowships Nominating Committee and the Ernst and Young Entrepreneurial Institute as national/regional judge. Mr. Bendis has or continues to provide global consulting services to several international organizations including the International Science Parks and Innova - tion Expert Group, the United Nations, NATO, UK Trade and Industry, European Commission, French Embassy, the German Marshall Fund, and others global ventures. * Biographies as of July 2009, distributed at symposium.

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241 APPENDIX B Mr. Bendis founded the Bendis Investment Group LLC, (BIG), a financial intermediary and consulting firm which has a joint venture with the Fortress In - vestment Group (NYSE, FIG) and is responsible for the origination of debt and equity investments located in BIG’s network. Mr. Bendis, also recently provided interim CEO consulting services to the National Association of Seed and Venture Funds (NASVF) and strategic growth and repositioning services to the Pennsyl - vania Biotechnology Center. Previously, Mr. Bendis served as president, and CEO of True Product ID, Inc.; a global publicly traded anticounterfeiting technology company (NASDAQ, TPID), which he relocated to Beijing, China. Mr. Bendis also founded and served as the founding president and CEO of Innovation Philadelphia (IP), a three-state regional public/private partnership dedicated to growing the wealth and work - force of the Greater Philadelphia Region. IP managed a portfolio of programs in four distinct areas: Direct Equity Investment/Financing Assistance; Technology Commercialization; Global/Regional Economic and Workforce Development; and Market Research and Branding. Mr. Bendis is on the IP Board of Directors. Previously, Mr. Bendis successfully leveraged a career in the private sec- tor (with Quaker Oats, Polaroid, Texas Instruments, Marion Laboratories, and Kimberly Services) and the venture capital industry (RAB Ventures) to lead the Kansas Technology Enterprise Corporation (KTEC). As its president and CEO, he developed KTEC into a globally recognized model for technology-based eco - nomic development. Mr. Bendis also successfully built an Inc. 500 health care software company, Continental Healthcare Systems, Inc., which he took public on NASDAQ and later sold to an international conglomerate. In addition, Mr. Bendis manages his own angel investment fund. Mr. Bendis is a frequent consultant and speaker to the United Nations, NATO, the European Commission, METI, AKEA, national and international technology-based economic development organizations, as well as over 20 states, several U.S. cities and regions, and 16 countries. Mr. Bendis serves on several regional and national not-for-profit boards and committees including the National Association of Seed and Venture Funds (NASVF) and the State Science and Tech- nology Institute (SSTI), both of which he was a founding board member. He was a nominee for the 2005 Ernst and Young National Entrepreneur Supporter of the Year Award (EOY) and was the 1996 recipient of the Regional Ernst and Young Entrepreneur of the Year Award; he currently serves as an EOY judge. He also serves on the board of FlagshipPDG (NASDAQ, PDGE). NOLAN BROWNE Nolan Browne was appointed managing director of the MIT-Fraunhofer Cen- ter for Sustainable Energy Systems in February 2008. He previously worked for * Biographies as of July 2009, distributed at symposium.

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242 FUTURE OF PHOTOVOLTAICS MANUFACTURING Massachusetts-based Evergreen Solar, where he was responsible for developing business relationships around Evergreen’s advanced module and expansion efforts. In this capacity, he successfully sourced three major polysilicon deals and played an instrumental role in sitting Evergreen’s largest integrated solar module factory in North America. Prior to this, Browne served as a senior associate at Cambridge Energy Research Associates, where he started up CERA’s Clean Energy Study. As a student at MIT’s Sloan School of Management, he founded the MIT Energy Conference and was involved with a number of MIT energy start-ups, including GreenFuel Technologies. As an entrepreneur, Browne has founded two successful for-profit companies to date. He holds an M.A. and B.A. in International Economics from Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) and an MBA from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. DAVID EAGLESHAM David Eaglesham is VP technology at First Solar. He has a Ph.D. in phys- ics from the University of Bristol and achieved tenure as a lecturer at Liverpool University before joining Bell Labs in 1988. At Bell Labs he worked on semi- conductor deposition techniques and doping and became director of electronic device research. He worked at Lawrence Livermore as chief technologist and at Applied Materials as director of advanced technologies before joining First Solar in 2006. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, was named Outstand- ing Young Investigator by the Materials Research Society in 1994, and was MRS president in 2005. STEPHEN EMPEDOCLES Dr. Stephen Empedocles is director of business development for SVTC Solar, a solar development foundry that enables companies to transition new photovol - taic technologies into fully qualified, manufacturable products, ready for volume production. As a serial entrepreneur in the CleanTech and Advanced Materials space, Dr. Empedocles has founded and grown businesses in photovoltaics, solid state lighting, fuel cells, catalysis, and displays. He has a Ph.D. in physical chem- istry from MIT and has been published in leading journals, including Science, Nature, Physical Review Letters, and Forbes, on topics ranging from fundamental nanoscience to the evolving trends in advanced materials business. He holds over 25 patents (issued and pending), and was selected as one of the world’s top 100 young innovators by MIT Technology Review. * Biographies as of July 2009, distributed at symposium.

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243 APPENDIX B PETE ENGARDIO Pete Engardio is a senior writer for BusinessWeek. Engardio joined Busi- nessWeek in 1985 as a correspondent in Atlanta. In 1987, he moved to Miami as bureau manager. In 1990, he became a correspondent in Hong Kong. In 1996, he moved to New York and was editor of the Asian edition from 1998 to 2001. In 2003, Engardio received George Polk, Loeb, and Sigma Delta Chi awards. He was part of a team that won a 1998 Overseas Press Club Award. He is co-author of Meltdown: Asia’s Boom, Bust, and Beyond. In 2004, Engardio was a Reuters Journalism Fellow at Oxford. CHARLIE GAY Dr. Charlie Gay was named president, Applied Solar, and chairman of the Applied Solar Council in 2009. As President of Applied Solar, Dr. Gay is respon - sible for positioning Applied and its solar efforts with important stakeholders in the industry, technical community and particularly governments around the world. As chairman of the Applied Solar Council, Dr. Gay leads a cross-company forum to assure cohesiveness on solar-related initiatives and strategy related to technology, and market development. An industry veteran with over 30 years of experience in the solar industry, Dr. Gay joined Applied Materials in 2006 as corporate vice president, general manager of the Solar Business Group. Dr. Gay is also a co-founder of the Greenstar Foundation, an organization that delivers solar power and Internet access for health, education and microen - terprise projects to small villages in the developing world. Greenstar has been recognized for its innovation by the World Bank, the Stockholm Challenge, the Technology Empowerment Network and the Tech Museum Awards. Dr. Gay began his career in 1975, designing solar power system components for communications satellites at Spectrolab, Inc. and later joined ARCO Solar, where he established the research and development program and led the com - mercialization of single crystal silicon and thin film technologies. In 1990, Dr. Gay became president and chief operating officer of Siemens Solar Industries, and from 1994 to 1997, he served as director of the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the world’s leading laboratory for en- ergy efficiency and renewable energy research and technology. In 1997, Dr. Gay served as president and chief executive officer of ASE Americas, Inc., and in 2001 became chairman of the advisory board at SunPower Corporation. Dr. Gay has a doctorate in physical chemistry from the University of California, Riverside. He holds numerous patents for solar cell and module con- struction and is the recipient of the Gold Medal for Achievement from the World Renewable Energy Congress. * Biographies as of July 2009, distributed at symposium.

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244 FUTURE OF PHOTOVOLTAICS MANUFACTURING GABRIELLE GIFFORDS Gabrielle Giffords is the U.S. Representative for the Eighth District of Ari- zona, a diverse area that covers 9,000 square miles including a 114-mile border with Mexico. Congresswoman Giffords serves on the House Armed Services Committee and the Subcommittees on Air and Land Forces and Military Readiness where she fights for our military men and women and their families and the installations she represents at Fort Huachuca and Davis-Monthan Air Force Base. On the House Science and Technology Committee and the Subcommittee on Energy and the Environment, Cong. Giffords promotes an agenda of energy independence and solar initiatives in an effort to make Southern Arizona the “Solar-con Valley” of the nation. On the House Foreign Affairs Committee and the Subcommittee on the Western Hemisphere, she monitors our country’s positions abroad, especially relationships in the Western Hemisphere and their impact on comprehensive im - migration reform in the United States. A third generation Arizonan and the youngest woman ever elected to the Arizona State Senate, Cong. Giffords represented her hometown of Tucson in the Arizona Legislature from 2000 to 2005. During her service in both the House of Representatives and the Senate, Cong. Giffords worked on legislation to expand health care coverage for Arizona families; to create and attract high-wage jobs to Arizona; and to protect Arizona’s environment and open spaces. She served on the Appropriations, Commerce and Economic Development and Finance Committees. As former president and chief executive officer of El Campo Tire, Inc., Cong. Giffords was able to utilize her experience as a small businesswoman with a broad background in national and international economic development. A 1996 graduate of Cornell University with a master’s degree in regional planning, she is also a graduate of Scripps College where she was awarded a William Fulbright Scholarship to study for a year in Chihuahua, Mexico. Between her undergradu- ate work and her masters she worked as a researcher in San Diego studying the effects of Operation Gatekeeper II on the San Ysidro Port of Entry. Experienced in international relations, Cong. Giffords served as president of the Atlantic Association of Young Political Leaders, represented the National Committee on China-U.S. Relations as a Young Leader’s Forum Fellow and was a German Marshall Fund Manfred-Worner Fellow. In 2005 Cong. Giffords was selected for the inaugural two-year class of the Aspen-Rodel Fellowships in Public Leadership. For combining her strong business background with a powerful commitment to public service, Cong. Giffords was named Woman of the Year by Tucson Busi - ness Edge in 2005; the YWCA named her Woman on the Move the same year. For her commitment to protecting the environment, she was named Legislator of the * Biographies as of July 2009, distributed at symposium.

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245 APPENDIX B Year by the Arizona Planning Association and Most Valuable Player by the Sierra Club. She was awarded the Top 10 Technology Legislator of the Year award by the Arizona Technology Council for three straight years - 2003, 2004, 2005. She was named the Legislator of the Year in 2004 by the Mental Health Association of Arizona. She was also recently named one of America’s Eight Young Leaders Worth Watching by Gannett News Service. Congresswoman Giffords’ commitment to her community has not been lim - ited to her service in the Legislature. She has devoted her time as a member of over a dozen boards including 162nd Air National Guard Fighter Wing Minute - man Committee, the Metropolitan YMCA, the Anti-Defamation League, the Breast Cancer Boot Camp and the Tohono Chul Park. She is also a member of Congregation Chaverim. With her family living in southern Arizona, Cong. Giffords has strong ties to Tucson and Sierra Vista. Her father served on the school board in Tanque Verde District and her mother is an art conservator. Her grandparents lived in south - eastern Arizona and are buried in Ft. Huachuca. Cong. Giffords and her husband Mark Kelly enjoy hiking and spending time in the canyons and desert of Arizona. JOHN GLOEKLER John Gloekler is CEO of Apogee Solar. Previously John was CEO of G2 Microsystems, an IC company that developed the world’s lowest power Wi-Fi chips. Prior to working at G2, he was a partner at Ernst & Young LLP and a leader of the supply chain practice. At E&Y, Mr. Gloekler led the Supply Chain Strategy practice and worked with IBM, Apple, HP, Seagate, Cisco, Microsoft, and others developing their supply chain strategies. He also held positions as vice president of manufacturing for Austek Microsystems and engineering roles at National Semiconductor and Texas Instruments. Mr. Gloekler has a B.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Cincinnati and an M.S. in business from Stanford University. SUBHENDU GUHA Subhendu Guha is the Chairman of United Solar Ovonic, the world’s largest manufacturer of flexible solar laminates. Dr. Guha is an international authority in the science and technology of amorphous silicon alloy solar cells. His work has received recognition from the U.S. Department of Energy (Bright Light Award), Popular Science magazine (Best of What’s New), and Discover magazine (Best Invention in the Environment Category). He was also the recipient of a World Technology Award in the Energy category in 2005 and a PVSEC Award in 2009. * Biographies as of July 2009, distributed at symposium.

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246 FUTURE OF PHOTOVOLTAICS MANUFACTURING KEVIN HUTCHINGS Kevin J. Hutchings is vice president of alliances, IBM Technology and Intellectual Property. He is responsible for IBM’s Microelectronics technology development and manufacturing business alliances and licensing. In this and his prior role, Mr. Hutchings has been a lead contributor in the growth of IBM’s suc - cessful semiconductor development alliances. Prior to assuming his current role in June of 2007, Mr. Hutchings was direc - tor of IBM’s System and Technology Group alliances, which develops, manu- facturers and markets IBM’s server, storage and microelectronics technologies, products and services. Mr. Hutchings joined IBM in 1979; during his career at IBM he has held numerous management and technical positions related to the development, manu- facturing and sales of IBM’s advanced semiconductor technologies and services. In 2004, he was named director of alliances. Mr. Hutchings received an Associate in Applied Science degree in electronics in 1979, a Bachelor of Science degree in electrical engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1984, and a Masters of Business Administration degree from the Zicklin School of Business in New York City in 1998. ALICIA JACKSON Alicia Jackson currently serves as professional staff for the U.S. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, under the Chairmanship of Sena - tor Jeff Bingaman. Dr. Jackson’s portfolio on the committee includes smart grid, manufacturing and industrial competitiveness, federal energy R&D, and advanced energy storage technologies. Dr. Jackson’s interests lie at the intersection of sci - ence and policy. She was an energy scholar in the Program on Science in the Public Interest at Georgetown University and founded a science policy course for science and engineering graduate students at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Prior to joining the committee, Dr. Jackson served as a policy fellow at the National Academies of Science and as an AAAS Congressional Science Fellow with the Senate Energy Committee. Dr. Jackson earned her Ph.D. in ma - terials science and engineering from MIT in 2007, where she discovered a new class of nanomaterials known as nanostructured nanoparticles. KRISTINA JOHNSON Kristina M. Johnson is the Under Secretary of the U.S. Department of En - ergy. She was previously the provost and senior vice president for academic af - fairs of Johns Hopkins University. Prior to that, Dr. Johnson served as the Dean of * Biographies as of July 2009, distributed at symposium.

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247 APPENDIX B Duke University’s Pratt School of Engineering from 1999-2007 where she helped to set up interdisciplinary efforts in photonics, bioengineering and biologically inspired materials, and energy and the environment. Before that she was on the faculty of the University of Colorado, Boulder, from 1985-1999, where she led an NSF Engineering Research Center and involved engineers, mathematicians, physicists, chemists and psychologists in working to make computers faster and better connected. Dr. Johnson is an electrical engineer with more than 129 U.S. and foreign patents or patents pending. JOHN LUSHETSKY John Lushetsky is Acting Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency in the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DoE’s) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). Mr. Lushetsky is responsible for EERE’s efforts to develop clean and energy-efficient technologies for vehicles, buildings, and industries and manages activities to implement energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies within the federal government. As part of EERE’s senior leadership, Mr. Lushetsky helps to oversee $16.8 billion in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding, including state, city, and community programs for energy efficiency, as well as other energy efficiency programs focused on build- ings, industrial technologies, and advanced vehicles. Prior to this position, Mr. Lushetsky served as program manager of DoE’s Solar Energy Technology Program (SETP) with responsibility for all activities under the Solar America Initiative. He directed the program’s $170 million budget through solar technology research and development agreements with universities, venture capital funded start-ups, and established companies and oversaw solar research and development through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and other national labs. In this role, Mr. Lushetsky led key solar market transformation programs in collaboration with legislators, industry groups, utilities, city governments, and other key stakeholders. Prior to his public service at the Department of Energy, Mr. Lushetsky’s career included more than 20 years experience in technology development and commercialization roles with both start-up and Fortune 500 companies. Most recently, he was with Corning, Inc., where he held a number of senior positions with responsibility for strategic marketing and business development activities and assessed new opportunities for the company in a number of new technol - ogy and market areas. He also previously managed acquisitions, collaborations, and minority equity investments which expanded the company’s access to new technologies. Prior to working at Corning, Mr. Lushetsky was with Electrosource, Inc., an advanced battery technology start-up for electric and hybrid vehicles. At * Biographies as of July 2009, distributed at symposium.

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248 FUTURE OF PHOTOVOLTAICS MANUFACTURING Electrosource, he forged groundbreaking international partnerships in India, China, and Taiwan managing marketing, business development, and company financing. Before Electrosource, Mr. Lushetsky consulted to the Department of Defense’s Strategic Defense Initiative Organization developing new strategies for systems engineering, procurement, and development of tactical and strategic missile defense systems. Mr. Lushetsky holds an MBA in international business from George Wash- ington University and an M.S. and B.S. with high honors in engineering science from the University of Florida. He previously has done research and development in advanced optical systems. W. CLARK MCFADDEN II W. Clark McFadden II is a partner at Dewey & LeBoeuf, LLP. He represents corporate clients in international trade, encompassing work in litigation, regula - tion, and legislation. He also specializes in international corporate transactions, especially the formation of joint ventures and consortia, and international inves - tigations and enforcement proceedings. Mr. McFadden has a broad background in foreign affairs and international trade, having experience with congressional committees, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the National Security Council. In 1986, he was appointed general counsel, President’s Special Review Board (“Tower Commission”), to investigate the National Security Council sys - tem and the Iran-Contra Affair. In 1979, Mr. McFadden served as special counsel to the Senate Foreign Rela- tions Committee on the Strategic Arms Limitations Treaty (SALT II). Previously, from 1973-1976, he was general counsel, Senate Armed Services Committee, and was responsible to the committee for all legislative, investigatory, and oversight activities. Mr. McFadden is the secretary to the board of directors of the Semiconductor Industry Association, the Optoelectronics Industry Development Association, and the Semiconductor Research Corporation. JAMES MORELAND James Moreland is the vice president of technology for SolarWorld Industries America. He is responsible for research and development, quality and for coordi - nating development tasks with SolarWorld Innovations, Freiberg. Prior experience—35 years in the semiconductor industry, primarily in the silicon materials part of the supply chain. Dr. Moreland’s posts have included the director of technology at Komatsu Silicon America, vice president for strategic * Biographies as of July 2009, distributed at symposium.

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249 APPENDIX B technology development for Siltronic Corp., vice president of research and devel- opment for Siltronic AG, and director of quality for Siltronic Corp., and he has participated for many years in the development of ITRS and SEMI Standards. MICHAEL POLCARI Michael R. Polcari has served as SEMATECH’s president and CEO since 2003. He is responsible for leading the consortium’s advanced technology R&D programs in lithography, front end processes, interconnect, and metrology. Dr. Polcari has also overseen the launch of two SEMATECH subsidiaries—ATDF, as a leading R&D processing and prototyping center, and the International SEMATECH Manufacturing Initiative (ISMI), which has added seven members during his tenure. Previously, Dr. Polcari was vice president of procurement engineering for IBM Global Procurement in Somers, NY, and was responsible for IBM’s engi - neering effort in procurement including supplier quality management. During his nearly 30 years of working for IBM, Dr. Polcari also held positions as research director—Silicon Technology and director of the Advanced Semiconductor Tech- nology Laboratory at the IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, and Lithography Systems Manager for the IBM Semiconductor Research and Development Center. Dr. Polcari earned a Ph.D. and Master of Science in solid-state physics from the Stevens Institute of Technology. He conducted additional graduate work in physics at the University of Maryland, and earned a Bachelor of Science in phys - ics from the University of Notre Dame. Polcari has served as chairman of the board of directors of the Semiconduc - tor Research Corporation (SRC) and as a member of several industry and uni- versity advisory boards. He is a member of the American Physical Society, the Electrochemical Society, the Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. KENT ROCHFORD Kent Rochford is the acting director of NIST Boulder Laboratories. He is also serving as the chief technical representative for the NIST Boulder Laborato - ries and acting director of the Electronics and Electrical Engineering Laboratory (EEEL). Dr. Rochford holds a Ph.D. in optical science from the University of Arizona and has broad experience in optoelectronics metrology. He joined NIST in 1992 as a postdoctoral research associate, and he conducted and led research on measurements and standards for sensing and communications until 2000. After two years of managing an engineering department in a start-up optical communi - cations company working on components for high-performance communication * Biographies as of July 2009, distributed at symposium.

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250 FUTURE OF PHOTOVOLTAICS MANUFACTURING systems, he returned to NIST in 2002. He was chief of the EEEL Optoelectronics Division from 2003 to 2008. DOUG ROSE Doug Rose joined SunPower in 2002 and currently holds the position of senior director, technology strategy. Previous roles at SunPower include product engineering manager of the company’s cell pilot line, director of module research and development, and technology development director. His career spans more than 20 years of manufacturing technology development, thin-film PV research, silicon cell and module development, and technology assessment at GTE, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, First Solar, and SunPower Corporation. Dr. Rose has degrees in mechanical engineering from Iowa State and Stanford University, and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Colorado. He has 58 publications and patents in the field of solar energy. JAMES SITES Jim Sites is the associate dean for research and professor in the Colorado State University College of Natural Sciences. From 1981 to 1987, Prof. Sites was coordinator for the undergraduate physics laboratories, and during 1989-1990, he was associate department chair with responsibilities for course scheduling, teaching assignments, and space utilization. In 1994-1995, he was part of the university’s Academic Change and Reform Committee, which initiated several university-wide structural changes. From 1990 through 2000, Prof. Sites served as department chair with direct responsibility for the success of a 20-faculty-member department. That success included a tripling of external funding, establishment of a nationally recognized high-energy physics program, development of a highly popular outreach program for precollege students, expansion of the department’s support staff, and comple- tion of a major building addition. Prof. Sites is currently serving in his sixth year as associate dean for research for the College of Natural Sciences. He has responsibility for major research and building projects, and he was instrumental in the establishment of the university’s clean-energy supercluster. He also coordinates with other Colorado universities, provides oversight for several centers and institutes, and serves on the Council of Research Associate Deans, which advises the vice president for research. * Biographies as of July 2009, distributed at symposium.

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251 APPENDIX B LARRY SUMNEY Larry W. Sumney is president and chief executive officer of the Semiconduc- tor Research Corporation (SRC). The SRC executes a global cooperative research effort in universities that is supported by leading integrated circuit manufacturers and suppliers worldwide. He received his B.A. from Washington and Jefferson College in 1962 with honors in physics; his master’s in engineering administra - tion (MEA) from George Washington University (GWU) and completed his course work toward the D.Sc. degree in systems engineering and mathematics, also at GWU. Mr. Sumney began his career as a research physicist at the Naval Research Laboratory in 1962, later serving as research director of the Naval Electronics Systems Command where he defined broad basic research initiatives to support advanced systems needs of the Command. Following that assignment, Mr. Sum- ney was named the director of the Tri-Service Charge Coupled Device (CCD) Technology Development Program by the Office of the Under Secretary of De- fense. He next joined the Office of the Undersecretary of Defense Research and Engineering where he had overall responsibility for the creation, implementation and management of the Very High Speed Integrated Circuits (VHSIC) Program, the largest (~ $1B) technology development program in the Department of De- fense. He was named a “VHSIC Pioneer” in 1987. In 1982, the Semiconductor Industry Association selected Mr. Sumney to head up the industry’s new research consortium, the Semiconductor Research Corporation. He was named president and CEO in 1984 and a member of SRC board of directors several years later. In 1997, he became chairman of board, MARCO, a wholly owned subsidiary of SRC, which manages the Focus Center Research Program. In 2005, he became chairman of the board, NERC, another wholly owned subsidiary of SRC, which manages the Nanoelectronics Research Initiative. Since the SRC Education Alliance was established, he has held the position of board chairman. The SRC Education Alliance which is also a wholly owned subsidiary of SRC. Mr. Sumney has served on the EECS Department Advisory Board of the University of California, Berkeley, on the University of Illinois, College of En - gineering Advisory Board and the North Carolina State University Engineering Advisory Board. He is chairman of the SIA University Research Award Selection Committee. He is a participant in the SIA’s Focus Center Research Program Gov- erning Council. He has served on the Director’s Advisory Board of the National Security Agency. He is an ex-officio member of the Board of Directors for SEMATECH and the Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA). He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and was awarded, together with * Biographies as of July 2009, distributed at symposium.

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252 FUTURE OF PHOTOVOLTAICS MANUFACTURING William C. Holton and Robert M. Burger, the 1998 IEEE Frederik Philips Medal. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), a member of the New York Academy of Sciences and is a University- Industry Forum Member (as a University Partner) of the National Academies’ (NAS, NAE, and NIH) Government, University, and Industry Research Round- table (GUIRR). He served as a member of the IEEE Robert N. Noyce Medal Committee from 1999 to 2002. He also served on the IEEE Frederik Philips Award Committee from 2000 to 2004. Mr. Sumney was named a member of AS- TRA’s (The Alliance for Science & Technology Research in America) Board of Directors’ in June 2004. In January 2006, Mr. Sumney began serving on the Sun Trust Board of Advisors and was named a member of the University of Albany, Board of Visitors in January 2006. SRC was the recipient of the National Medal of Technology in 2007; the year 2007 marks the 25th anniversary of SRC. Mr. Sumney has provided the overall leadership for SRC since its inception in 1982. MARK UDALL Mark Udall was elected to the U.S. Senate by the people of Colorado on November 4, 2008, after representing the state’s second congressional district for five terms (from 1999 to 2008). Prior to that, Udall served in the Colorado State Legislature as a Member of the General Assembly for one term (1997-1999), representing the 13th district, which encompassed the community of Longmont and parts of southern Boulder County. In the Senate, Mr. Udall serves on three committees and is one of a few fresh - man Senators chosen to lead a subcommittee. These committees include Armed Services, Energy and Natural Resources, and the Special Committee on Aging. Reinforcing his priority of protecting our western lands, Senator Udall chairs the National Parks Subcommittee. His committee assignments give him a platform to address many issues important to Colorado, including national security, energy, the economy, ‘green jobs,’ and natural resources. Senator Udall is known for reaching across party lines to solve problems and for his willingness to work with people, including those with whom he has philo- sophical differences. His inclusive and bipartisan approach has led to a number of legislative achievements, including legislation to reduce wildfire risk and bark- beetle infestation, promoting the development of Colorado’s aerospace industry, the high technology sector and energy resources, with particular focus on renewable energy and the so-called “Green Energy Economy.” Senator Udall also led efforts to successfully pass the James Peak Wilderness Bill and legislation transforming the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons facility into a wildlife refuge. He’s also championed * Biographies as of July 2009, distributed at symposium.

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253 APPENDIX B health care for workers and retirees from the nation’s nuclear weapons complex and consumer protection against abusive and predatory credit card companies. Regarded as a national leader on renewable energy, Senator Udall worked to put Colorado at the forefront of sustainable energy development. In 2004, he successfully co-chaired the Amendment 37 campaign to pass Colorado’s first Renewable Electricity Standard (RES), which requires power companies to use more alternative energy sources. In 2007, the House of Representatives twice passed a national renewable electricity standard championed by Senator Udall. He continues his work in the Senate to enact a national RES. Senator Udall is also known for his efforts to develop a tough and smart national security strategy, leading legislative action to expand and strengthen the U.S Army. Moreover, Senator Udall has consistently fought for programs to benefit our nation’s veterans. The Denver Post notes that Senator Udall has a proven track record of bi- partisan accomplishments. The Rocky Mountain News says, “time and again he’s reached across the political aisle to craft a compromise solution to some sticky political problem.” The Grand Junction Daily Sentinel calls Senator Udall “con- scientious,” “highly capable” and “energetic.” Senator Udall was born on July 18, 1950, in Tucson, Arizona, but has spent his entire adult life in Colorado. After graduating from Williams College in 1972, he moved to Colorado’s western slope and began a long and successful career with the Colorado Outward Bound School, as a course director and educator from 1975 to 1985 and as the organization’s executive director from 1985 to 1995. Senator Udall is an avid mountaineer and has climbed or attempted some of the world’s most challenging peaks, including Mt. Everest. Senator Udall’s family is no stranger to public service. His father, Morris “Mo” Udall, served in the U.S. House of Representatives for 30 years and ran for the Democratic nomination for President in 1976. His uncle, Stewart, is widely revered for his accomplishments while serving as Secretary of the Interior under U.S. presidents Kennedy and Johnson. In 2008, Udall’s cousin, Tom Udall, was elected to the Senate from New Mexico. Senator Udall and his wife, prominent attorney and conservationist Maggie Fox, have two children: a son Jed and a daughter Tess. They live near Eldorado Springs in Boulder County. BETTINA WEISS Bettina Weiss is the senior director of photovoltaics for SEMI’s PV Group. She has been working in the semiconductor and related industries for almost 20 years. She joined the SEMI organization in January 1996 in the SEMI Europe office in Brussels, Belgium, as standards coordinator. In spring of 1997, she * Biographies as of July 2009, distributed at symposium.

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254 FUTURE OF PHOTOVOLTAICS MANUFACTURING transferred to SEMI Global Headquarters in San Jose, California, as standards development specialist and, in 2000, became manager, program development, where she was responsible for the expansion of the SEMI International Stan - dards Program into new technologies and new regions. From November 2003 to March 2008, she served as director, international standards, as chief staff of the SEMI International Standards Program. In April 2008, she accepted the position of senior director, photovoltaics, managing all aspects of SEMI’s PV Group initiatives globally. Ms. Weiss works with industry stakeholders, academia, and governments worldwide, as well as the SEMI International board of directors to drive PV Group’s global strategic mission in public policy, standardization, manufacturing supply chain support, market research and other initiatives. Prior to joining SEMI, Ms. Weiss worked in marketing and sales positions at Metron Technology and Varian Semiconductors in Munich, Germany. She holds a B.A. degree in English from the Ludwig-Maximilian-University of Munich and is a certified translator (English) for Anglo-American Law and Economics. She lives with her husband Don in San Jose, California. CHARLES WESSNER Charles Wessner is a National Academy Scholar and director of the Program on Technology, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship. He is recognized nationally and internationally for his expertise on innovation policy, including public-pri - vate partnerships, entrepreneurship, early-stage financing for new firms, and the special needs and benefits of high-technology industry. He testifies to the U.S. Congress and major national commissions, advises agencies of the U.S. govern - ment and international organizations, and lectures at major universities in the United States and abroad. Reflecting the strong global interest in innovation, he is frequently asked to address issues of shared policy interest with foreign gov - ernments, universities, research institutes, and international organizations, often briefing government ministers and senior officials. He has a strong commitment to international cooperation, reflected in his work with a wide variety of countries around the world. Dr. Wessner’s work addresses the linkages between science-based economic growth, entrepreneurship, new technology development, university-industry clus- ters, regional development, small-firm finance and public-private partnerships. His program at the National Academies also addresses policy issues associated with international technology cooperation, investment, and trade in high-tech - nology industries. Currently, he directs a series of studies centered on government measures to encourage entrepreneurship and support the development of new technologies and the cooperation between industry, universities, laboratories, and government * Biographies as of July 2009, distributed at symposium.

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255 APPENDIX B to capitalize on a nation’s investment in research. Foremost among these is a con- gressionally mandated study of the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program, reviewing the operation and achievements of this $2.3 billion award program for small companies and start-ups. He is also directing a major study on best practice in global innovation programs, entitled Comparative Innovation Policy: Best Practice for the 21st Century. Today’s meeting on “Partnering for Photovoltaic Manufacturing in the United States” forms part of a complementary analysis entitled Competing in the 21st Century: Best Practice in State & Regional Innovation Initiatives. The overarching goal of Dr. Wessner’s work is to develop a better understanding of how we can bring new technologies forward to address global challenges in health, climate, energy, water, infrastructure, and security. KEN ZWEIBEL Ken Zweibel is the founding director of the George Washington University Solar Institute. He has almost 30 years experience in solar photovoltaics. He was the program leader for the Thin Film PV Partnership Program at the National Renewable Energy Lab until 2006. The Thin Film Partnership worked with most participants in thin-film PV (companies, universities, scientists) and is often cred- ited with being crucial to the development of thin film PV in the United States. Corporate graduates of the Partnership include First Solar, Unisolar, Global Solar and numerous others. Dr. Zweibel subsequently co-founded and became president and chairman of a thin-film CdTe PV start-up, PrimeStar Solar. PrimeStar was subsequently purchased by General Electric and is now the feature company in their solar portfolio. In 2008 he became founding director of The George Wash - ington University Solar Institute. Dr. Zweibel is well known worldwide in solar energy. Recently, he co- authored a Scientific American article (January 2008) on solar PV and concentrat- ing solar power as solutions to climate change and energy problems. He has also written two books and numerous articles on solar PV. He is participating on the DoE “Solar Vision” activity, which is defining a pathway for solar to be deployed on an energy significant scale in the United States. Dr. Zweibel is a graduate of the University of Chicago in physics. * Biographies as of July 2009, distributed at symposium.