Linda P. Fried is dean of the Mailman School of Public Health and senior vice president of Columbia University Medical Center. Her core research interests are prevention and health promotion for older adults, with particular emphasis on the discovery of the causes of frailty and disability and their prevention. She is a board-certified internist and geriatrician, with postdoctoral training at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions in geriatrics, general internal medicine, and epidemiology (cardiovascular and aging). She is a recipient of a National Institute on Aging MERIT Award. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine. She received an M.D. degree from Rush Medical College and an M.P.H. degree from the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health.


Linda G. Martin is a senior fellow at RAND, serving as an advisor on a variety of RAND studies and activities, as well as conducting her own research on the health of older people in the United States and Asia. She is also an adjunct professor in the Department of Population, Family, and Reproductive Health at the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University. Previously she served as president of the Population Council; as vice president for research development at RAND; and as director of the Committee on Population at the National Research Council. She has held other teaching and research appointments at Princeton University, Georgetown University, and the University of Michigan. She has M.P.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Princeton University.


Joshua Salomon is an associate professor of international health in the Department of Population and International Health at Harvard University. His research focuses on priority setting in global health in three main substantive areas: measurement of population health status and health valuations; modeling and forecasting health outcomes and disease burden; and evaluation of the potential impact and cost-effectiveness of current and future health interventions. He is an investigator on projects funded by National Institute on Aging and the Gates Foundation relating to summary measures of population health; modeling HIV/AIDS epidemics and interventions for prevention and treatment; modeling disease outcomes for population health monitoring and surveillance; and evaluating the potential impact and cost-effectiveness of new vaccines. He also leads a collaborative project with the Mexican Ministry of Health on priority setting for interventions in the context of health reform. He has a Ph.D. degree from Harvard University.


Arthur A. Stone is a distinguished professor of psychiatry and of psychology, vice chair of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, and director of the Applied Behavioral Medicine Research Institute at Stony Brook University. His research interests focus on self-reports of medical



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