Appendix A
Biographic Information on the Committee on Emergency and Continuous Exposure Guidance Levels for Selected Submarine Contaminants

DAVID DORMAN (Chair) is associate dean for research and graduate studies in the College of Veterinary Medicine at North Carolina State University. The primary objective of his research is to provide a refined understanding of chemically induced neurotoxicity in laboratory animals that will lead to improved assessment of potential neurotoxicity in humans. Dr. Dorman's research interests include neurotoxicology, nasal toxicology, and pharmacokinetics. He served as a member of the National Research Council Committee on Animal Models for Testing Interventions Against Aerosolized Bioterrorism Agents and the previous Committee on Emergency and Continuous Exposure Guidance Levels for Selected Submarine Contaminants. He received his DVM from Colorado State University. He completed a combined PhD and residency program in toxicology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and is a diplomate of the American Board of Veterinary Toxicology and the American Board of Toxicology.


REBECCA BASCOM is a professor of medicine at the Milton S. Hershey Medical Center at Pennsylvania State University. Her expertise includes lung diseases and inhalation toxicology. Dr. Bascom leads the analysis team that is evaluating the cardiorespiratory health effects on New York City police officers exposed during the 9/11 terrorist attack. She has served on three National Research Council committees: the Committee on the Evaluation of the Department of Defense Comprehensive Clinical Evaluation Protocol, the Committee on Occupational Safety and Health in Research Animal Facilities, and the Committee



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Appendix A Biographic Information on the Committee on Emergency and Continuous Exposure Guidance Levels for Selected Submarine Contaminants DAVID DORMAN (Chair) is associate dean for research and graduate studies in the College of Veterinary Medicine at North Carolina State University. The primary objective of his research is to provide a refined understanding of chemi- cally induced neurotoxicity in laboratory animals that will lead to improved as- sessment of potential neurotoxicity in humans. Dr. Dorman's research interests include neurotoxicology, nasal toxicology, and pharmacokinetics. He served as a member of the National Research Council Committee on Animal Models for Testing Interventions Against Aerosolized Bioterrorism Agents and the previous Committee on Emergency and Continuous Exposure Guidance Levels for Se- lected Submarine Contaminants. He received his DVM from Colorado State University. He completed a combined PhD and residency program in toxicology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and is a diplomate of the American Board of Veterinary Toxicology and the American Board of Toxicol- ogy. REBECCA BASCOM is a professor of medicine at the Milton S. Hershey Medical Center at Pennsylvania State University. Her expertise includes lung diseases and inhalation toxicology. Dr. Bascom leads the analysis team that is evaluating the cardiorespiratory health effects on New York City police officers exposed during the 9/11 terrorist attack. She has served on three National Re- search Council committees: the Committee on the Evaluation of the Department of Defense Comprehensive Clinical Evaluation Protocol, the Committee on Oc- cupational Safety and Health in Research Animal Facilities, and the Committee 160

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161 Appendix A on Health Effects of Indoor Allergens. Dr. Bascom earned her MD from the University of Oregon Health Sciences Center. DAROL DODD is a senior research toxicologist and director of the Division of Toxicology and Preclinical Studies at the Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences. From 1990 to 2006, he was the program manager of the Toxic Hazards Research Unit under contract to the Air Force at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. His current primary responsibilities are to lead and coordinate applied toxicol- ogy research projects and to support marketing efforts for new business oppor- tunities. His specific expertise is inhalation toxicology. He has more than 25 years of experience in toxicology and health-hazard assessments and is author or co-author of more than 200 scientific journal articles, book chapters, technical reports, and abstracts. He serves on editorial boards of toxicology journals and science committees. Dr. Dodd received his PhD in pharmacology and toxicology from the University of Kansas and is a diplomate of the American Board of Toxicology. WANDA HASCHEK-HOCK is a veterinary pathologist and professor of com- parative pathology at the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine. She has over 30 years of experience in comparative, respiratory, and toxicologic pathology and has over 100 scientific peer-reviewed publications in pathology and toxicology. She has served on editorial boards of toxicology journals and numerous science committees and received the Society of Toxicologic Pathol- ogy’s Achievement Award in 2007. Her research has focused on the patho- physiology of chemicals and natural environmental toxins with a recent focus on mycotoxins and food safety. Dr. Haschek-Hock received her BVSc (equivalent to a DVM) from the University of Sydney and her PhD from Cornell University. She is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Pathologists and the American Board of Toxicology. JAMES LOCKEY is a professor of environmental health and internal medicine (Pulmonary Division) at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. His clinical interests include pulmonary disease, internal medicine, and occupational medicine, but his main research interests are in occupational pulmonary disease. He has been an investigator on a number of human research studies on pulmo- nary effects of occupational exposure to vermiculite contaminated with asbesti- form minerals, on reproductive effects of occupational exposure to solvents, on respiratory morbidity and mortality in workers exposed to refractory ceramic fiber, on obstructive lung disease and diacetyl exposure associated with micro- wave-popcorn production, and on the relationship of diesel-exhaust exposure and the risk of allergic rhinitis and asthma in young children. He has also served as a member of the National Research Council Subcommittee on Manufactured Vitreous Fibers. Dr. Lockey earned his MD from Temple University.

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162 Exposure Guidance Levels for Selected Submarine Contaminants JOHN MORRIS is the head of the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences and a professor of pharmacology and toxicology at the University of Connecticut. His professional interests include inhalation toxicology, air pollutants and asthma, risk assessment, and physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling. He has served on an asbestos committee for the Connecticut Academy of Sci- ence and Engineering and was chair of the Connecticut Hazardous Air Pollutant Advisory Panel. Dr. Morris has also served on the editorial boards of Funda- mental and Applied Toxicology, Inhalation Toxicology, and Toxicological Sci- ences. He earned a PhD in toxicology at the University of Rochester. JOHN O’DONOGHUE is an adjunct associate professor of environmental medicine at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry. He was the director of the Health and Environment Laboratories and vice president for health, safety, and environment at Eastman Kodak Company until his retire- ment in 2004. His research interests include neurotoxicology and toxicologic pathology. Dr. O'Donoghue has served on several National Research Council committees, including the Committee on Toxicology, the Subcommittee on Toxicological Hazard and Risk Assessment, and the previous Committee on Emergency and Continuous Exposure Guidance Levels for Selected Submarine Contaminants. He received his VMD and PhD from the University of Pennsyl- vania and is a diplomate of the American Board of Toxicology. ANDREW SALMON is a senior toxicologist and chief of the Air Toxicology and Risk Assessment Section at the California Environmental Protection Agency (Cal/EPA). Previously, he was a staff toxicologist in the Reproductive and Cancer Hazard Assessment Section of Cal/EPA and a consultant toxicolo- gist with the California Public Health Foundation. He heads a group of toxicolo- gists in Cal/EPA responsible for public-health risk assessments of toxic air con- taminants. Dr. Salmon is a member of a number of professional organizations, including the Society of Toxicology, the Society for Risk Analysis, the British Toxicology Society, and the Royal Society of Chemistry. Dr. Salmon earned a PhD in biochemistry from Oxford University, UK. KATHLEEN THIESSEN is a senior scientist at SENES Oak Ridge, Inc., Cen- ter for Risk Analysis. She has extensive experience in evaluating exposures, doses, and risks to human health from environmental contaminants and in the use of uncertainty analysis for environmental and health risk assessment. Dr. Thiessen has led working groups on dose reconstruction and urban remediation for the International Atomic Energy Agency’s Biosphere Modelling and As- sessment Programme and the Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety Programme. She has also served as a member of the National Research Council Committee on Toxicologic Risk of Fluoride in Drinking Water. She received her PhD in genetics from the University of Tennessee-Oak Ridge Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences.

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163 Appendix A JOYCE TSUJI is a principal scientist and director of the Center for Toxicology and Mechanistic Biology in the Health Sciences Practice of Exponent, Inc. She is a board-certified toxicologist and a fellow of the Academy of Toxicological Sciences. She specializes in assessing health and environmental risks associated with chemicals in the environment or from consumer products. She has designed and implemented programs involving exposure assessment, biomonitoring, health education, and exposure intervention for populations with food-chain or environmental exposures. Dr. Tsuji has been recognized as an expert in risk as- sessment and toxicology in the United States and internationally on assignments for private clients, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Depart- ment of Justice, the Australian Environmental Protection Agency, and the states of New Jersey and Washington. She is currently serving on the National Re- search Council Committee on Toxicology and the Standing Committee on Risk Analysis Issues and Reviews, and she has previously served on the Committee on Spacecraft Exposure Guidelines, the Committee on Submarine Escape Action Levels, the first Committee on Emergency and Continuous Exposure Guidance Levels for Selected Submarine Contaminants, and the Committee on Copper in Drinking Water. Dr. Tsuji received her PhD from the Department of Zoology with an emphasis in physiology and ecology at the University of Washington.