Appendix D
Committee Membership

Dr. Charles E. Kolb Jr. (Chair) is the president and chief executive officer of Aerodyne Research Inc. (ARI), a position he has held since 1984. Since 1970 ARI has provided research and development services requiring expertise in the physical and engineering sciences to commercial and government clients working to solve national and international environmental problems. These include a wide range of topics such as global and regional environmental quality and the development of clean and efficient energy and new propulsion technologies. Dr. Kolb has received numerous professional honors and has served in a broad range of professional and Academy-related positions. He has been elected a fellow of the American Geophysical Union, the American Physical Society, the Optical Society of America, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is currently chair of the Advisory Council for the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Princeton University and has served as chair of the Committee for Environmental Improvement of the American Chemical Society (2000-2008). He has contributed to a variety of National Academies studies and is currently serving as a member of the National Research Council’s Board on Chemical Science and Technology. Dr. Kolb holds an S.B. in chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and an M.S. and Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Princeton University. His research interests include atmospheric, combustion, and materials chemistry as well as physics and chemistry of aircraft and rocket exhaust plumes. In addition to over 250 reports, nonrefereed symposia papers, patents, book reviews, and policy papers, Dr. Kolb has published over 190 archival journal articles and book chapters.



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Appendix D Committee Membership Dr. Charles E. Kolb Jr. (Chair) is the president and chief executive offi- cer of Aerodyne Research Inc. (ARI), a position he has held since 1984. Since 1970 ARI has provided research and development services requir- ing expertise in the physical and engineering sciences to commercial and government clients working to solve national and international environ- mental problems. These include a wide range of topics such as global and regional environmental quality and the development of clean and efficient energy and new propulsion technologies. Dr. Kolb has received numerous professional honors and has served in a broad range of professional and Academy-related positions. He has been elected a fellow of the American Geophysical Union, the American Physical Society, the Optical Society of America, and the American Association for the Advancement of Sci- ence. He is currently chair of the Advisory Council for the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Princeton University and has served as chair of the Committee for Environmental Improvement of the American Chemical Society (2000-2008). He has contributed to a variety of National Academies studies and is currently serving as a member of the National Research Council’s Board on Chemical Science and Technology. Dr. Kolb holds an S.B. in chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and an M.S. and Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Princeton University. His research interests include atmospheric, combustion, and materials chemistry as well as physics and chemistry of aircraft and rocket exhaust plumes. In addition to over 250 reports, nonrefereed symposia papers, patents, book reviews, and policy papers, Dr. Kolb has published over 190 archival journal articles and book chapters. 

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 APPENDIX D Dr. Tami Bond is an associate professor of civil and environmental engi- neering and an affiliate professor in atmospheric sciences at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Dr. Bond’s research addresses the aerosol chemistry, physics, and optics that govern the environmental impacts of combustion effluents. Her research includes development of past, present, and future global emission inventories, global simulations of aerosol trans- port and fate, and laboratory and field measurements of particle emission rates and properties. Dr. Bond is a member of American Geophysical Union and American Association for Aerosol Research, and an editor at Aerosol Science and Technology. She holds a B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Washington, an M.S. in mechanical engineering (University of California, Berkeley) and an interdisciplinary Ph.D. in atmospheric sciences, civil engineering, and mechanical engineering (University of Washington, 2000). She held a NOAA Climate and Global Change Postdoctoral Fellow- ship before joining the University of Illinois in 2003. Dr. Mae S. Gustin is an associate professor in the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences at the University of Nevada in Reno. Her primary research interest is the study of the fate and transport of contaminants in the environment. Dr. Gustin’s current work focuses primarily on sources and sinks for atmospheric mercury and the pathways by which atmospheric mercury is input to ecosystems. Specific research topics include quantifying the contribution of natural sources of mercury to the atmosphere; understanding soil-plant-air mercury exchange processes; investigating fugitive mercury emissions from active gold mines; character- izing the role of plants in biogeochemical cycling of mercury; development of surrogate surfaces for measuring atmospheric mercury dry deposition as well as passive samplers for characterization of air-mercury speciation; measurement of air-mercury speciation and dry deposition at locations in Nevada, Utah, and the southeastern United States; and characterization of mercury concentrations, water quality, and sources of mercury to select res- ervoirs in Nevada. Other environmental contaminants of research include arsenic, trifluoroacetic acid and organophosphate pesticides. Her regular teaching responsibilities include the following courses: Environmental Pol- lution (sophomore level), NRES 467/667 Regional and Global Issues in Environmental Science (senior capstone), and NRES 765 Biogeochemical Cycles (graduate student class) Dr. Gustin received her Ph.D. from the Uni- versity of Arizona in economic geology and geochemistry in 1988. Dr. Gregory R. Carmichael, professor of chemical and biological engineer- ing at the University of Iowa, is a leader in the development of emissions inventories for natural and pollutant substances and of chemical transport models at scales ranging from local to global. He has worked extensively

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 APPENDIX D on issues of long-range transport of acidic and photochemical pollutants from Asia and on the impact of Asian development on the environment. He is an active instructor and adviser, having supervised 29 M.S. and 24 Ph.D. students. Dr. Carmichael received his Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Kentucky in 1979. He has served as department chair and is director of the Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research. He is presently chair of the Scientific Advisory Committee of the WMO Urban Environment Research Program and serves on the steering commit- tee of the Commission on Atmospheric Chemistry and Global Pollution. He has been a member and chair of the American Meteorological Society’s Committee on Atmospheric Chemistry and on numerous other committees and boards. Dr. Carmichael has over 220 refereed journal publications and serves on a number of editorial boards. Dr. Kristie L. Ebi currently serves as executive director of the Inter- governmental Panel on Climate Change Technical Support Unit for Working Group II. She previously served as senior managing scientist in Exponent’s Health Sciences Center for Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Computational Biology. Dr. Ebi specializes in research on the potential impacts of global environmental change, and on the design of adaptation response options to reduce negative impacts. She designs, conducts, and interprets scientific investigations, including analyses and evaluation of data and literature. She has worked on a range of issues related to the potential health impacts of global climate change, including impacts associated with vector borne diseases, heat waves, extreme events (flooding), food-borne diseases, and air pollution. She conducts research on the potential health impacts of residen- tial and occupational exposures to magnetic fields. Examples of the studies on which she has worked range from the possible role of magnetic field exposure in childhood leukemia to occupational magnetic field exposures in garment workers. Dr. Ebi is a lead author for the Human Health chapter in the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. She was lead author in Working Group II (Response Options) of the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (Chapters on Human Health and on Uncertainties in Assessing the Effectiveness of Response Options Regarding Ecosystem Services). She was a lead author of the Health Sector Analysis Team of the U.S. National Assessment of the Potential Consequences of Cli- mate Variability and Change, and was a contributing author to the Human Health Chapter of the Third Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Dr. David P. Edwards is a senior scientist and group leader in the Atmo- spheric Chemistry Division at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). He is also a NASA investigator and the NCAR Project Leader for

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 APPENDIX D the MOPITT instrument on the NASA Terra satellite, with management responsibilities for data processing, algorithm enhancement, data validation exercises, and coordinating science investigations. His research concentrates on the scientific utilization of tropospheric remote sensing data with empha- sis on the cross-scale combination of measurements from multiple satellite platforms, aircraft, and ground stations. He is a coauthor of a white paper submitted to the NRC Decadal Survey charged with determining the pri- orities for the next round of missions for Earth Science and Applications from Space. He received his Ph.D. in dense plasma physics theory from the University of Birmingham in 1987. Dr. Henry E. Fuelberg is a professor of meteorology at Florida State Uni- versity. His research is in the areas of synoptic and mesometeorology. Dr. Fuelberg’s current NASA research projects examine the long-range transport of pollutants from Asia, Mexico, and Alaskan wildfires using data from past and upcoming NASA airborne field projects. Dr. Fuelberg also has close ties with the National Weather Service, studying ways to improve thunderstorm and lightning forecasts in the southeastern United States improved forecasts of Florida lightning also are being sponsored by Florida Power & Light Corp. He is preparing a high-resolution (4 * 4 km, hourly) historical precipitation database (1996-current) for the Florida Department of Environmental Protection that will be used in precipitation and hydrologic studies. He received his Ph.D. in meteorology in 1976 from Texas A&M University. Dr. Jiming Hao is a professor in the Department of Environmental Engineer- ing at Tsinghua University and dean of the Research Institute of Envi- ronmental Science and Engineering. He received his Ph.D. in 1984 in environmental engineering from the University of Cincinnati. He serves as vice editor-in-chief for the Journal of the Air & Waste Management Asso- ciation, and is a member of the Chinese Academy of Engineering. Dr. Hao has published nearly 200 academic papers and a number of monographs on a wide variety of issues related to air pollution control engineering. Dr. Daniel J. Jacob is the Vasco McCoy Family Professor of Atmospheric Chemistry and Environmental Engineering at Harvard University. He was formerly the Gordon McKay Professor of Atmospheric Chemistry and Environmental Engineering (1994-2004). Dr. Jacob’s research focuses on understanding the composition of the atmosphere, its perturbation by human activity, and the implications for human welfare and climate. He has served on the NASA Earth Systems Science and Applications Advisory Committee and has been lead or co-lead scientist on several NASA air- craft missions. He is also the lead scientist for the GEOS-CHEM chemi-

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 APPENDIX D cal transport model used by a large number of research groups in North America and Europe. Dr. Jacob is the recipient of the NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal (2003) and the American Geophysical Union James B. Macelwane Medal (1994). He was chair of the NRC Committee on Radiative Forcing Effects on Climate (2003-2005) and also served as a member of the Committee on Earth Studies (1996-1999) and the Study on Transportation and a Sustainable Environment (1994-1997). Dr. Daniel A. Jaffe is a professor of atmospheric and environmental chemis- try at the University of Washington, Bothell. He is also an adjunct professor in the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Washington, Seattle. His areas of expertise are in global and regional atmospheric pollu- tion, especially mercury; carbon monoxide; ozone; nitrogen oxides; aerosols and other metals; and long-range transport of air pollution in the Arctic and Pacific regions. Over the past 15 years he has been studying these pollutants at sites in Alaska, Russia, Japan, and several island stations in the Pacific Ocean. He received his Ph.D. in chemistry in 1987 from the University of Washington. His graduate work was concentrated in inorganic, analytical and atmospheric chemistry, atmospheric sciences, and environmental sci- ences and policy. Dr. Sonia Kreidenweis is a professor of atmospheric science at Colorado State University. Her research focuses on characterization of the physi- cal, chemical, and optical properties of atmospheric particulate matter, and the effects of the atmospheric aerosol on visibility and climate. She has conducted field studies in several U.S. national parks to establish the sources and characteristics of particulate matter responsible for visibility degradation, with a recent focus on the impacts of prescribed and wild fires. Ongoing laboratory and field studies have investigated the role of particles and of individual compounds found in particulate matter in the nucleation of cloud droplets and ice crystals. Prof. Kreidenweis is a past president of the American Association for Aerosol Research. She received her B.E. in chemical engineering from Manhattan College and her M.S. and Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the California Institute of Technology. Dr. Katharine S. Law, moved to the University of Cambridge in 1987 to do a Ph.D. in atmospheric chemistry after studying environmental sciences and meteorology at university in the United Kingdom, Dr. Katharine S. Law worked for three years at the U.K. Meteorological Office. During her Ph.D. and subsequent years as a postdoc, senior research associate, NERC advanced research fellow at Cambridge, her research interests focused on quantifying the budgets and trends of trace gases such as tropospheric ozone and methane using numerical models and comparison with observa-

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 APPENDIX D tions. She has taken part in the organization of many international airborne campaigns investigating processing in pollutant plumes. She has also been an active private investigator in the MOZAIC project since 1994. Since 2002 she has been employed as director of research by the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique at Service d’Aeronomie in Paris. Here she has pursued research into the long-range transport of pollutants as part of the ICARTT/ITOP project in particular co-leading the Lagrangian field project and IGAC Task ITCT-2K4. She was also a co-coordinator for the participation of the M55-Geophysica aircraft during the AMMA campaign in summer 2006 (also an IGAC task) as well as leading the global chemi- cal and aerosol modeling effort within AMMA-France/EU. Dr. Law is also co-chair of a new task POLARCAT-IPY that is focusing on transport of trace gases and aerosols to the Arctic in the framework of the International Polar Year. Dr. Michael J. Prather is the Fred Kavli Chair and Professor in the Depart- ment of Earth System Science at University of California, Irvine. Dr. Prather has gained international recognition for research on atmospheric green- house gases, such as methane and ozone. As a member of the International Ozone Commission, Dr. Prather has participated in key U.N. environmental efforts. He has regularly addressed both government and business groups and is a scientific participant in major global environmental summits. Prior to joining the UC Irvine faculty Dr. Prather directed research at Harvard University and the Goddard Institute for Space Studies. A fellow of the American Geophysical Union and a member of the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters, he served from 1997 through 2001 as editor-in- chief of Geophysical Research Letters. Dr. Prather has served on numer- ous NRC committees, including the Planning Group for the Workshop on Direct and Indirect Human Contributions to Terrestrial Greenhouse Gas Fluxes (Chair, 2003-2004), the Committee for Review of the U.S. Climate Change Science Program Strategic Plan (2002-2004), the Committee on EPA “Atmospheric Sciences” Workshop #1: Probabilistic Estimates of Cli- mate Sensitivity (2002-2003), and the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate (2000-2003). Dr. Staci L. Simonich is an associate professor in the Department of Envi- ronmental and Molecular Toxicology and Chemistry at Oregon State Uni- versity. Her current research focuses on understanding the atmospheric transport and deposition of semi volatile organic compounds to high- elevation ecosystems. The research program seeks to understand the relative impact of current and historical Asian, Pacific Ocean, and North American sources on contamination at high elevations. Dr. Simonich received her Ph.D. in chemistry from Indiana University in 1995. She received the Roy

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 APPENDIX D F. Weston Environmental Chemistry Award from the Society of Environ- mental Toxicology and Chemistry in 2001 and the National Science Foun- dation Career Award in 2003. Dr. Mark H. Thiemens is professor of chemistry and biochemistry and dean of the Division of Physical Sciences at the University of California, San Diego. He also directs UCSD’s environmental science efforts in the inter- disciplinary Center for Environmental Research and Training. As a scientist he is best known for his discovery of the mass-independent isotope effect, which has improved scientific understanding in areas as diverse as climate change, the origin of the solar system, chemical physics, acid rain, and the accumulation of greenhouse gases. The discovery led to his selection for the 1998 Ernest O. Lawrence Medal, the most prestigious award given to scientists by the U.S. Department of Energy. Dr. Tiemens received his Ph.D. in chemical oceanography from Florida State University, his M.Sc. from Old Dominion University, and his B.S. from the University of Miami. He was elected as a member of the National Academy of Sciences in 2006. Staff Dr. Laurie S. Geller is a senior program officer with the National Acad- emies and serves within the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate. She received a Ph.D. in analytical and atmospheric chemistry from the University of Colorado, Boulder in 1996. Her doctoral research (carried out with NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratory) focused on observa- tions of the greenhouse gases nitrous oxide and sulfur hexafluoride. In 1996 she served as an AAAS Science Policy Fellow with the U.S. EPA’s Office of Atmospheric Programs. From 2003 to 2008 she served as a science officer for the International Council for Science and taught at American University in Paris. She has directed several National Academies studies that addressed various aspects of atmospheric chemistry, climate change, and sustainable development.

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