Study Committee Biographical Information

José A. Gómez-Ibáñez, Chair, is Derek C. Bok Professor of Urban Planning and Public Policy at Harvard University, where he holds a joint appointment at the Graduate School of Design and the John F. Kennedy School of Government. He teaches courses in economics, infrastructure, and transportation policy in both schools. Dr. Gómez-Ibáñez’s research interests are in transportation, infrastructure, and economic development, and he has authored or edited a half dozen books including Regulating Infrastructure: Monopoly, Contracts and Discretion; Essays in Transportation Economics and Policy: A Handbook in Honor of John R. Meyer (with William Tye and Clifford Winston); and Going Private: The International Experience with Transport Privatization (with John R. Meyer). At Harvard, Dr. Gómez-Ibáñez currently serves as faculty cochair (with Henry Lee) of the Infrastructure in a Market Economy executive program at the Kennedy School. In the past he has been faculty chair of the Masters in Urban Planning Program at the Design School (2001–2004), the Masters in Public Policy Program at the Kennedy School (1996–1998), doctoral programs at the Design School (1992–1995), and the Department of Urban Planning and Design at the Design School (1984–1988). Dr. Gómez-Ibáñez received an AB in government from Harvard College and an MPP and a PhD in public policy from Harvard University.


Marlon G. Boarnet is Professor in the Department of Planning, Policy, and Design and in the Department of Economics at the University



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Study Committee Biographical Information José A. Gómez-Ibáñez, Chair, is Derek C. Bok Professor of Urban Plan- ning and Public Policy at Harvard University, where he holds a joint appointment at the Graduate School of Design and the John F. Kennedy School of Government. He teaches courses in economics, infrastructure, and transportation policy in both schools. Dr. Gómez-Ibáñez’s research interests are in transportation, infrastructure, and economic develop- ment, and he has authored or edited a half dozen books including Regulat- ing Infrastructure: Monopoly, Contracts and Discretion; Essays in Trans- portation Economics and Policy: A Handbook in Honor of John R. Meyer (with William Tye and Clifford Winston); and Going Private: The International Experience with Transport Privatization (with John R. Meyer). At Harvard, Dr. Gómez-Ibáñez currently serves as faculty cochair (with Henry Lee) of the Infrastructure in a Market Economy executive program at the Kennedy School. In the past he has been faculty chair of the Masters in Urban Planning Program at the Design School (2001–2004), the Masters in Public Policy Program at the Kennedy School (1996–1998), doctoral programs at the Design School (1992–1995), and the Depart- ment of Urban Planning and Design at the Design School (1984–1988). Dr. Gómez-Ibáñez received an AB in government from Harvard College and an MPP and a PhD in public policy from Harvard University. Marlon G. Boarnet is Professor in the Department of Planning, Policy, and Design and in the Department of Economics at the University 232

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233 Study Committee Biographical Information of California, Irvine, where he served as chair of the Planning, Policy, and Design Department from 2003 through 2006. He is coauthor with Randall Crane of Travel by Design: The Influence of Urban Form on Travel (2001). Dr. Boarnet is managing coeditor of the Journal of Regional Science; associate editor of the Journal of the American Planning Association; and editorial board member of Papers in Regional Science, the Journal of Planning Literature, and the Journal of Transport and Land Use. He has won the Best of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning (ACSP) award for one of three best papers presented at the ACSP meeting in 1997 and the Fannie Mae Foundation Prize for best paper on housing and community development, presented at the ACSP meeting in 2000. He has authored or coauthored several refereed journal articles on land use–travel behavior interactions, the link between urban development patterns and transportation infrastructure, econometric models of intrametropolitan growth, and local economic development policy. Dr. Boarnet has conducted funded research for the California and U.S. Departments of Transportation, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the World Bank, among others. He received a BA in physics from Rice University and a master’s degree in public affairs and a PhD from Princeton University. Dianne R. Brake is President of PlanSmart NJ in Trenton, New Jersey. With degrees in sociology and planning, she was hired in 1985 to run the Regional Forum, a multidisciplinary public–private partnership that developed a 10-point action plan for central New Jersey. In 1990 she was made President of PlanSmart NJ, and with the board, she has presided over many organizational changes, such as the growth from a regional to a statewide organization and the creation of many innovative planning tools and strategies designed to improve the results of land use plans, regulations, and infrastructure investments. Ms. Brake has developed in-depth knowledge of land use planning in central New Jersey, as well as in statewide transportation, housing, and state plan

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234 Driving and the Built Environment programs. She is an experienced facilitator and has developed working relationships with state agency officials; developers; county planners; mayors; and a broad range of nonprofit groups, including environmental, housing, transportation, urban, and social justice advocates. She has been appointed to statewide agencies by three governors, both Republican and Democrat. Ms. Brake is a founding officer in two statewide coalitions— the New Jersey Regional Coalition and the Coalition for Affordable Housing and Environment. In 1998 she was awarded a German Marshall Environmental Fellowship, which allowed her to travel to 13 European cities to study policies related to land use and transportation. Ms. Brake received a BA in sociology from Hollins College and an MFA in social design (planning) from California Institute of the Arts. She also did doctoral studies in sociology and planning at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland. Robert B. Cervero is Professor of City and Regional Planning, Director of the Institute of Urban and Regional Development, and Director of the University of California Transportation Center at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of numerous articles and books on sustainable transportation policy and planning, both in the United States and abroad. In recent years, Dr. Cervero has been an advisor and consultant for transport projects in China, Colombia, Brazil, Australia, the Philippines, Korea, Ireland, and numerous U.S. cities. His current research is on land use impacts on travel in China, neighborhood impacts of freeway deconstruction, parking generation characteristics of transit-oriented development, and travel impacts of office park to mixed-use center conversions. Dr. Cervero was the first recipient of the Dale Prize for Excellence in Urban Planning Research and in 2003 won the Article of the Year award from the Journal of the American Planning Association. He presently serves on the editorial boards of Urban Studies, the Journal of Planning Literature, the Journal of Sustainable Transport, the Journal of the American Planning Association, and the Journal of Public Transportation and chairs the National Advisory Committee of the Active Living Research Program of the Robert Wood

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235 Study Committee Biographical Information Johnson Foundation. He has also served as an instructor for professional development courses for the World Bank Institute and the National Transit Institute. Dr. Cervero received a BS from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; an MCP and an MSE from Georgia Tech; and a PhD from the University of California, Los Angeles. Andrew Cotugno is Senior Policy Advisor to the Metro Council and the Metro Chief Operating Officer of Metro in Portland, Oregon. He has more than 35 years of professional experience in the transportation and land use planning fields. Prior to his appointment to this position, he served as the Metro Planning Director, with responsibility for regional growth management and the urban growth boundary, travel forecast- ing, light rail planning, transportation planning and financing, transit- oriented development, and Metro’s map center and Regional Land Information System. Previously, he worked as a transportation planner for both Metro and the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission. Mr. Cotugno received a bachelor’s degree in city and regional planning from California Polytechnic State University in 1974 and has done graduate work in public administration at Lewis and Clark College in Portland. Anthony Downs is a Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C., where he has been since 1977. He is the author or coauthor of 24 books and more than 500 articles. His best-known books are A n Economic Theory of Democracy (1957), translated into several foreign languages, and Inside Bureaucracy (1967), both of which are still in print. His latest books are Still Stuck in Traffic (2004) and Growth Management and Affordable Housing: Do They Conflict? (editor, 2004) from Brookings, Costs of Sprawl—2000 (coauthor, 2002) from the Transit Cooperative Research Program, New Visions for Metropolitan America (1994) from Brookings and the Lincoln Institute, Niagara of Capital (2007) from the Urban Land Institute, and Real Estate and the Financial Crisis (2009) from the Urban Land Institute. Dr. Downs has served as a consul- tant to many of the nation’s largest corporations; major developers; dozens

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236 Driving and the Built Environment of government agencies at the local, state, and national levels [including the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the White House]; and many private foundations. President Johnson appointed him to the National Commission on Urban Problems in 1967, and HUD Secretary Jack Kemp appointed him to the Advisory Commission on Regulatory Barriers to Affordable Housing in 1989. He received a PhD and an MA from Stanford University and a BA and an honorary law degree from Carleton College. Susan Hanson, NAS, is Research Professor of Geography at Clark University, where she previously served as Director of the School of Geography and as Landry University Professor. She is an urban geog- rapher with interests in gender and economy, transportation, and sus- tainability. She has published several books and numerous articles on the travel activity patterns of individuals and households in urban areas and on gender issues in local labor markets. Dr. Hanson has edited four geography journals—Urban Geography, Economic Geography, the Annals of the Association of American Geographers, and The Professional Geographer— and currently serves on the editorial boards of several other journals. A former Guggenheim Fellow, she is a member of the National Academy of Sciences; a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences; and a Past President of the Association of American Geographers. Dr. Hanson chaired the Committee on Physical Activity, Health, Transportation, and Land Use of the Transportation Research Board (TRB) and the Institute of Medicine (IOM). She has been a member of the TRB Executive Committee and its Subcommittee for NRC Oversight. Dr. Hanson earned an MS and a PhD in geography at Northwestern University. Kara M. Kockelman is Professor and William J. Murray, Jr., Fellow, Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering, University of Texas at Austin. Her primary research interests include

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237 Study Committee Biographical Information the statistical modeling of urban systems (including models of travel behavior, trade, and location choice), the economic impacts of trans- port policy, crash occurrence and consequences, and transport policy making. Dr. Kockelman became chair of the TRB Travel Survey Methods Committee in April 2007. She also serves on TRB’s Transportation and Land Development Committee, Statistical Methodology and Statistical Computer Software Committee, and Integrated Transportation and Land Use Modeling Subcommittee. She sits on the editorial advisory board of Transportation Research, the editorial board of the Journal of Regional Science, and the editorial board of Papers in Regional Science. Dr. Kockelman is the primary author of papers on a variety of subjects, all of which involve transportation data analysis. She has conducted research for the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the National Cooperative Highway Research Program, the University Transportation Centers program, and the Texas and Oregon Departments of Transportation. She received a PhD, an MS, an MCP, and a BS from the University of California, Berkeley. Patricia L. Mokhtarian is Professor of Civil and Environmental Engi- neering, Chair of the interdisciplinary Transportation Technology and Policy MS/PhD program, and Associate Director for Education of the Institute of Transportation Studies at the University of California, Davis. Before coming to Davis in 1990, she spent 9 years in regional planning and consulting in Southern California. Dr. Mokhtarian specializes in the study of travel behavior. Her research has focused on the travel- related impacts of telecommunications technologies, attitudes toward travel itself, and the role of lifestyle and attitudes in the relationship between residential location and travel behavior. She is an area editor of Transportation; serves on the editorial advisory boards of Transportation Research A, Transportation Policy, and Transportation Letters; and has been a board member of the International Association for Travel Behaviour Research. Dr. Mokhtarian is former founding chair and now emeritus member of TRB’s standing Telecommunications and Travel Behavior

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238 Driving and the Built Environment Committee and an emeritus member of its standing Traveler Behavior and Values Committee. She was a member of the Committee on Physical Activity, Health, Transportation, and Land Use of TRB and IOM. She received an MS and a PhD in operations research from Northwestern University. Rolf J. Pendall is Associate Professor in the Department of City and Regional Planning at Cornell University, where he teaches courses in land use planning, growth management, environmental planning, affordable housing, and quantitative methods. His research on land use controls concerns why communities adopt them, how they vary across the United States, whether they work as intended, and whether they have desirable or undesirable consequences for affordable housing, ethnic and racial diversity, and the environment. In particular, he is interested in the prevalence and patterns of exclusionary zoning in U.S. cities. Dr. Pendall also uses geographic information systems and qualitative methods to analyze the patterns of and reasons for transi- tion from rural to urban land use. His other research interests include tenant-based housing assistance and private property rights. Dr. Pendall holds a PhD in city and regional planning from the University of California, Berkeley; an MS in community and regional planning; an MA in Latin American studies from the University of Texas at Austin; and a BA in sociology from Kenyon College in Ohio. Danilo J. Santini is Senior Economist at the Center for Transportation Research, Energy Systems Division, at Argonne National Laboratory. As a researcher from 1983 to the present, Dr. Santini has published several analyses of economic problems and transport-sector behavior associated with making a transition from one transportation fuel or system to another. This work includes examinations of the U.S. economy and transportation system in the 19th and 20th centuries. Dr. Santini has worked on developing and proving theories that involve energy’s role in long-term growth and in the more short-term fluc-

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239 Study Committee Biographical Information tuations of the business cycle, with an emphasis on energy’s macro- economic influence acting through transportation systems. His research emphasizes the interplay among fuel price shocks, environ- mental and safety regulations, transportation technology adaptation, and economic growth. He is the author of dozens of articles, reports, and conference papers and has been chair of TRB’s Alternative Fuels Committee. Dr. Santini holds a PhD in urban systems engineering and public policy analysis from Northwestern University, an MS in business and economics from the Illinois Institute of Technology, and a bachelor’s degree in architecture from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Frank Southworth is a member of the Senior Research and Develop- ment Staff at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in East Tennessee and a Principal Research Scientist at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta. Prior to joining ORNL, he was a member of the civil engineering faculty at the University of Illinois and a research staff member in the Institute for Transport Studies at the University of Leeds in England. His interests center on the adoption of cost-effective, energy-efficient, and environmentally sustainable forms of transportation, with a current emphasis on freight logistics and urban form. He has carried out R&D projects for a variety of federal, state, and not-for-profit agencies. Dr. Southworth is an active member of a number of TRB committees and has served on regional, national, and international review panels and working groups dealing with different aspects of transportation planning methods and models related to passenger and freight move- ment. He is the author of numerous peer-reviewed journal articles, book chapters, and technical reports. Dr. Southworth holds a BA with honors and a PhD in geography from the University of Leeds, England.

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