FIGURE 5-1 Global Early Warning and Response System (GLEWS) for Major Animal Diseases, including Zoonoses.

FIGURE 5-1 Global Early Warning and Response System (GLEWS) for Major Animal Diseases, including Zoonoses.

SOURCE: OIE (2009).

Ebola Reston virus was identified in pigs and humans in the Philippines. Information was gathered and shared by the three organizations through GLEWS, which also facilitated the coordination in the communication to the public. In addition, GLEWS provides information to aid in predicting outbreaks of emerging diseases such as Rift Valley fever.

INFOSAN

The INFOSAN network promotes global food safety by disseminating information and fostering international collaboration. As of May 2009, 177 countries have designated more than 350 INFOSAN Emergency Contacts and INFOSAN Contact Points. As shown in Figure 5-2, INFOSAN links to all stakeholders along the “food chain”—including the private sector—and coordinates with IHR and GLEWS. This also means that emergency information related to foodborne diseases and contamination in some cases do not only reach countries through this FAO/WHO mechanism focusing of food safety authorities



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