APPENDIX B
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

MAY R. BERENBAUM, Chair, is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and Professor and Department Head of the Department of Entomology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Dr. Berenbaum earned her Ph.D. in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology from Cornell University and has been a member of the Department of Entomology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign since 1980, chairing the department since 1992. Her research addresses the chemical mediation of interactions between plants and insects and encompasses multiple hierarchical levels, ranging from molecular mechanisms to community structure. In addition, she is concerned with the practical application of ecological principles to insect-plant interactions in an agricultural context. For this research, she has received many honors, including the Robert H. MacArthur Award from the Ecological Society of America, and is a fellow of the Entomological Society of America and the American Philosophical Society. Dr. Berenbaum currently serves on the editorial boards of several journals, including the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and is President of the American Institute of Biological Sciences. As a member of the National Academy of Sciences, she serves on the Division on Earth and Life Studies Committee and has chaired National Research Council boards and study committees, including the Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources, and the Committee on the Status of Pollinators.


THOMAS E. BUNDY is a former Deputy Assistant General Counsel in the Office of General Counsel at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). In his 31 years experience as an attorney for the USDA, he supervised legal work for the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), including the control and eradication of plant and animal diseases and pests. He was instrumental in the drafting and passage of the Plant Protection Act and the Animal Health Protection Act, and is very knowledgeable concerning USDA's animal and plant quarantine authorities and their application, both domestically and internationally. He has instructed APHIS employees on how to implement and enforce those authorities. Since retiring from the Federal government in 2002, Mr. Bundy has consulted with various organizations, including the Pew Charitable Trust Initiative on Food and Biotechnology regarding USDA’s authority under the Plant Protection Act and the Animal Health Protection Act. Mr. Bundy received his J.D. from the University of Virginia School of Law.


SEAN B. CASH is a Faculty Associate in the Department of Consumer Science, University of Wisconsin–Madison, and an Associate Professor in the Department of Rural Economy at University of Alberta (Canada). His research focuses on the economics and policy of



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   APPENDIX B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members MAY R. BERENBAUM, Chair, is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and Professor and Department Head of the Department of Entomology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Dr. Berenbaum earned her Ph.D. in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology from Cornell University and has been a member of the Department of Entomology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign since 1980, chairing the department since 1992. Her research addresses the chemical mediation of interactions between plants and insects and encompasses multiple hierarchical levels, ranging from molecular mechanisms to community structure. In addition, she is concerned with the practical application of ecological principles to insect-plant interactions in an agricultural context. For this research, she has received many honors, including the Robert H. MacArthur Award from the Ecological Society of America, and is a fellow of the Entomological Society of America and the American Philosophical Society. Dr. Berenbaum currently serves on the editorial boards of several journals, including the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and is President of the American Institute of Biological Sciences. As a member of the National Academy of Sciences, she serves on the Division on Earth and Life Studies Committee and has chaired National Research Council boards and study committees, including the Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources, and the Committee on the Status of Pollinators. THOMAS E. BUNDY is a former Deputy Assistant General Counsel in the Office of General Counsel at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). In his 31 years experience as an attorney for the USDA, he supervised legal work for the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), including the control and eradication of plant and animal diseases and pests. He was instrumental in the drafting and passage of the Plant Protection Act and the Animal Health Protection Act, and is very knowledgeable concerning USDA's animal and plant quarantine authorities and their application, both domestically and internationally. He has instructed APHIS employees on how to implement and enforce those authorities. Since retiring from the Federal government in 2002, Mr. Bundy has consulted with various organizations, including the Pew Charitable Trust Initiative on Food and Biotechnology regarding USDA’s authority under the Plant Protection Act and the Animal Health Protection Act. Mr. Bundy received his J.D. from the University of Virginia School of Law. SEAN B. CASH is a Faculty Associate in the Department of Consumer Science, University of Wisconsin–Madison, and an Associate Professor in the Department of Rural Economy at University of Alberta (Canada). His research focuses on the economics and policy of 18 

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LETTER REPORT 19 environmental protection, resource conservation, food, and health. Recent research areas include border enforcement for reducing invasive species risks, risk ranking in food safety issue, the impact of economic incentives on consumer health, and corporate incentives to participate in cooperative resource management schemes. He has provided expert input to Alberta’s inter- agency taskforce on invasive species risk assessment tools. Dr. Cash serves on the executive committee of the food safety and nutrition section of the Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, and on the editorial board of the Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics. He holds a Ph.D. and M.S. in Agricultural and Resource Economics from the University of California, Berkeley, as well as an M.A. in Economics from the University of Michigan and a B.A. in International Relations from the Johns Hopkins University. RACHAEL E. GOODHUE is an Associate Professor in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics at the University of California, Davis. Dr. Goodhue’s work has a strong public policy focus, and her research is concentrated in two areas: the industrial organization of agriculture, particularly agricultural contracts; and agri-environmental policy, particularly pesticide regulation and the economics of invasive species. Her interests include property rights and institutions governing natural resource use, including impacts of property rights design for pastoralist systems in sub-Saharan Africa, and negotiations over water rights and use in California and France. Dr. Goodhue has served on editorial boards including the Associate Editor, Agricultural Economic, 2007–2009; Editorial Council, Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, 2006; the American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural Economics, and the Review of Industrial Organization. She is a member of Gamma Sigma Delta and Phi Beta Kappa. Dr. Goodhue holds a Ph.D. in Agricultural and Resource Economics from the University of California, Berkeley. VINCENT P. JONES is a Professor in the Department of Entomology and head of the Insect Ecology and Behavior Laboratory, located at the Tree Fruit Research and Extension Center, Washington State University. His background and experience involve the use of various aspects of population biology, ecology, and insect behavior to improve integrated pest management (IPM) of insects and mites. Dr. Jones seeks to improve IPM programs by developing much of the basis of management systems (e.g., sampling/monitoring systems for key pests, phenology models, basic information on life history and population demography, dispersal). His current projects are focused on improving biological control in tree fruit orchards. Towards this end, Dr. Jones directs a recently funded Cooperative States Research Education and Extension Service (CSREES), U.S. Department of Agriculture Specialty Crops Research Initiative Grant with 9 others from California, Oregon and Washington. In addition to active research, Dr. Jones has developed an outreach program based on emerging knowledge on IPM for the WSU Decision Aid System that help growers and fieldmen optimize their pest management strategies. Dr. Jones is an accomplished scientist with over 92 refereed articles and book chapters. His professional service includes: Reviewer (1999–2005), President (2006), and President-Elect (2005) Western Orchard Pest and Disease Management Conference. He holds a Ph.D. in Entomology from the University of California at Riverside. NICHOLAS J. MILLS is a Professor in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management at the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Mills’ research focuses on biological control of insect pests and the ecology of insect parasitism and predation. He is currently working on a classical biological control program for the Light Brown Apple Moth in California.

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20 REVIEW OF APHIS RESPONSE The major emphases in his work involve addressing the determinants of success in classical biological control and the augmentation of natural enemy populations. His research interests include a variety of aspects of natural enemy biology, from behavior and evolutionary biology to population and community ecology through observational, experimental, and comparative analysis. Dr. Mills has been awarded the Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources Distinguished Service Award, Outstanding Faculty, 1997; and the College of Natural Resources Distinguished Teaching Award, 2002. Dr. Mills publishes peer-reviewed articles regularly with well over 100 articles and is highly cited. Dr. Mills holds a Ph.D. in Population Ecology from the University of East Anglia, UK. L. JOE MOFFITT is a Professor in the Department of Resource Economics at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. Professor Moffit’s research is on the economics of crop protection with particular emphasis on new technology and biosecurity. He lectures on quantitative methods in resource economics, and is especially interested in applications of economics to biology-based crop protection and in applications of biology-based quantitative methods to economics and econometrics. He has written 25 extension reports and over 50 research publications. His service and outreach activities include advising agricultural agencies about the economics of crop protection programs and chairing the Herbert L. Forest Scholarship Committee. He is a member of the American Agricultural Economics Association, the American Economic Association, and the Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association. Dr. Moffitt has also served as a member on the NRC Committee on California Agricultural Research Priorities: Pierce's Disease. Dr. Moffitt received his Ph.D. in Agricultural and Resource Economics from the University of California, Berkeley. JERRY A. POWELL is Director Emeritus of the Essig Museum of Entomology and Professor Emeritus of Entomology at the University of California-Berkeley. The principal theme of Dr. Powell’s research has been to discover and correlate biological features with traditional morphological evidence in the development of biosystematic relationships of small moths, particularly tortricids. His research has served to develop comprehensive local inventories of the species, to provide means for estimating species’ diversity in North Temperate Zone* Lepidoptera, and to analyze larval-host plant relationships of the Lepidoptera communities. Dr. Powell has published extensively on the biodiversity, evolution, and field behavior of Lepidoptera. He has also served as President of the Society of Systematic Zoology, the Pacific Coast Entomological Society, and of the Lepidopterists’ Society. He received his Ph.D. in entomology from the University of California-Berkeley. DANIEL S. SIMBERLOFF is the Nancy Gore Hunger Professor of Environmental Studies at the University of Tennessee and past president of the American Society of Naturalists. He received his A.B. from Harvard College in 1964 and his Ph.D. in biology from Harvard University in 1968. His 350 publications center on ecology, biogeography, evolution, and biometrics, and they often relate to the causes and consequences of species associating with one another in communities. Much of his research for the last 20 years has focused on conservation issues, such as reserve design, the consequences of fragmentation and habitat destruction, and the impacts and management of introduced species. His research projects involve insects, plants, birds, and mammals. He directs the University of Tennessee Institute for Biological Invasions. He was instrumental in formulating the presidential Executive Order 13112 on invasive species, and serves on the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Invasive Species

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LETTER REPORT 21 Specialist Group and the IUCN Species Survival Commission. Dr. Simberloff is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Ecological Society of America's Eminent Ecologist Award. Among his many professional activities, he served as Associate Editor of the Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics (2001–present), and as a member of the National Science Board (2000–2006), the National Marine Fisheries Service Recovery Science Review Panel (2004–2006), the Editorial Board of BioScience (1994–present), and as Editor-in-Chief of Biological Invasions (2008–present). Dr. Simberloff has served on previous committees and was a member of the Board on Life Sciences. ROBERT C. VENETTE is currently a Research Biologist with the USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station and Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of Entomology, University of Minnesota. He specializes in the areas of invasion biology and pest risk assessment. His research primarily focuses on the development and application of methods to predict the potential geographic and impact of nonnative organisms that are not known to occur in the United States or are present, but of limited distribution. He has studied insects, pathogens, and weeds. Species that he has studied include Mediterranean pine engraver (Orthotomicus erosus), the South American noctuid moth (Copitarsia corruda), the causal agent of sudden oak death (Phytophthora ramorum), reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea), and, recently, light brown apple moth (Epiphyas postvittana). His review of the statistical underpinnings of surveys for rare individuals was cited as a foundational document by the European Plant Protection Organization during the development of EPPO Standard PM 3/65(1) Sampling of consignments for visual phytosanitary inspection. Dr. Venette also helped to pioneer the development of a graduate curriculum on risk analysis for introduced species and genotypes at the University of Minnesota. The effort was sponsored primarily by the National Science Foundation program for Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeships. Dr. Venette has produced several “mini” pest risk assessments that have been used by state and federal agencies to inform strategic decisions about surveys for exotic pest species. Dr. Venette received his PhD in 1997 in Ecology from the University of California, Davis.