Appendix A
Workshop Agenda and Participants

AGENDA


Exploring the Intersection of Science Education and the Development of 21st Century Skills: A Workshop


February 5-6, 2009


Workshop Goals: The workshop is designed to explore six guiding questions, listed at the end of the agenda. Each workshop session focuses on one or more of these questions, as shown below.


Day 1: Thursday, February 5

8:00

Introductions (Working Breakfast)

8:30

Welcoming Remarks

 

Carlo Parravano, Merck Institute for Science Education

Bruce Fuchs, NIH Office of Science Education

Arthur Eisenkraft, Committee Chair, University of Massachusetts, Boston

9:00

Introduction to KWL Activity: Arthur Eisenkraft, Moderator Carbonless copy notebooks will be used to record notes on what you know, want to know, and learned (KWL) throughout the workshop. You will be invited to share anonymous copies at the end of both days of the workshop.



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Appendix A Workshop Agenda and Participants AgENDA Exploring the Intersection of Science Education and the Development of 21st Century Skills: A Workshop February 5-6, 2009 Workshop goals: The workshop is designed to explore six guiding questions, listed at the end of the agenda. Each workshop session focuses on one or more of these questions, as shown below. Day 1: Thursday, February  8:00 Introductions (Working Breakfast) 8:30 Welcoming Remarks Carlo Parravano, Merck Institute for Science Education Bruce Fuchs, NIH Office of Science Education Arthur Eisenkraft, Committee Chair, University of Massachusetts, Boston 9:00 Introduction to kWL Activity: Arthur Eisenkraft, Moderator Carbonless copy notebooks will be used to record notes on what you know, want to know, and learned (KWL) throughout the workshop. You will be invited to share anonymous copies at the end of both days of the workshop. 11

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120 APPENDIX A The committee will use the copies to guide day 2 of the workshop, and staff may use the copies in the workshop summary report. 9:20 Session 1: Panel Discussion on Demand for 21st Century Skills (Question 5) William Bonvillian, MIT, Washington, DC Office, Moderator Emily DeRocco, The Manufacturing Institute, Panelist Janis Houston, Personnel Decisions Research Institutes, Panelist Ken Kay, Partnership for 21st Century Skills, Panelist Guiding Questions for Session 1: • How may development of 21st century skills through science education help prepare young people for lifelong learning, work, and citizenship (e.g., making personal decisions about health, making political decisions about global warming, making workplace decisions)? • What is known about transferability of these skills to real workplace applications? What might have to change in terms of learning experiences to achieve a reasonable level of skill transfer? 10:15 Break 10:30 Session 2: 21st Century Skills and Science Education goals (Question 1) Marcia Linn, University of California-Berkeley, Moderator Christian Schunn, University of Pittsburgh, Presenter Bruce Fuchs, NIH Office of Science Education, Respondent Guiding Questions for Session 2: • What are the areas of overlap between 21st century skills and the skills and knowledge that are the goals of current efforts to reform science education? • To what extent do science education standards treat science process skills and conceptual knowledge as separate or intertwined? • What changes might be needed in science standards to support students’ development of 21st century skills in the context of science education?

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121 APPENDIX A 11:30 Session 3: Adolescent Development of 21st Century Skills (Questions 2, 4) Christine Massey, University of Pennsylvania, Moderator Eric Anderman, Ohio State University, Presenter Gale Sinatra, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Presenter Susan Koba, Science Education Consultant, Respondent Guiding Questions for Session 3: • What is the state of research on children’s and adolescents’ developing ability to tackle complex tasks in the context of science education? • What are the promising models or approaches for teaching these skills in science education settings? What, if any, evidence is available about the effectiveness of those models? 12:30 Session 4: kWL groups—Discussion of Sessions 1, 2, and 3 (Working Lunch) Room Assignments: 106-green; 202-red, 205-yellow; 104-blue; 202-light blue; 205-orange; 100-dark blue; 100- neon green. Participants, presenters, committee, and staff will break into small groups (assigned by color) to discuss what they learned during the morning sessions and what they want to know more about. Please plan to bring your notebook to your breakout session. Results will be shared in the plenary report out. 2:30 Report Out (Room 100) William Sandoval, Moderator 3:30 Break 3:45 Session 5: Promising New Science Curricula I (Questions 3 and 4) Arthur Eisenkraft, Moderator Doug Clark, Arizona State University, Presenter Rodger Bybee, Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (Emeritus), Presenter Guiding Questions for Session 5: • What unique, domain-specific aspects and practices of science appear to hold promise for developing 21st century skills? • What are the promising models or approaches for teaching these skills in science education settings? What, if any, evidence is available about the effectiveness of those models?

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122 APPENDIX A 5:00-5:15 Wrap-up of the Day Arthur Eisenkraft, Moderator 5:15-7:15 Reception for All Participants Day 2: Friday, February  8:00 Review of the Previous Day’s Activities (Working Breakfast) 8:30 Reflections on Science Education and 21st Century Skills Carlo Parravano, Merck Institute for Science Education, Presenter 8:35 Session 6: Promising New Science Curricula II (Questions 3 and 4) Carlo Parravano, Moderator Janet Kolodner, Georgia Institute of Technology, Presenter Joe Krajcik, University of Michigan, Presenter Guiding Questions for Session 6: • What unique, domain-specific aspects and practices of science appear to hold promise for developing 21st century skills? • What are the promising models or approaches for teaching these skills in science education settings? What, if any, evidence is available about the effectiveness of those models? 10:00 Break 10:15 Session 7: Science Teacher Readiness for 21st Century Skills (Question 6) William Sandoval, Moderator Mark Windschitl, University of Washington, Presenter Elizabeth Carvellas, NRC Teacher Advisory Council, Respondent Guiding Questions for Session 7: • What is known about how prepared science teachers are to help students develop 21st century skills? • What new models of teacher education may support effective teaching and student learning of 21st century skills, and what evidence (if any) is available about the effectiveness of these models? 11:30 Break to Pick up Lunch

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12 APPENDIX A 11:45 Session 8: kWL groups—Discussion of Sessions 5, 6, and 7 (Working Lunch) Room Assignments: 106-green; 109-red; 205-yellow; 205- blue; 109-light blue; 110-orange; 100-dark blue; 100-neon green. Participants, presenters, committee, and staff will break into small groups (assigned by color) of 9-12 per group to discuss what they learned in sessions 5, 6, and 7, and what they want to know more about. Please plan to bring your notebook to your breakout group. Results will be shared in the plenary report out. 12:50 Report Out (Room 100) Christine Massey, Moderator 1:15 Session 9: Assessing 21st Century Skills (Questions 3 and 4) Marcia Linn, Moderator Janis Houston, Personnel Decisions Research Institutes, Presenter Maria Ruiz-Primo, University of Colorado, Denver, Presenter Guiding Questions for Session: • What are the promising models or approaches for teaching these skills in science education settings? • What existing science assessments and other assessments hold promise for measuring 21st century skills and what evidence is available about these assessments? • What does a review of existing assessments suggest for design of future assessments to measure 21st century skills? 2:30 Break 2:45 Session 10: Reflections on the Workshop by Committee Members Arthur Eisenkraft, Committee Chair, University of Massachusetts, Boston William Bonvillian, MIT, Washington, DC Office Marcia Linn, University of California, Berkeley Christine Massey, University of Pennsylvania Carlo Parravano, Merck Institute for Science Education William Sandoval, University of California, Los Angeles 3:20 Closing Questions and Comments Arthur Eisenkraft, Moderator 3:30 Adjourn

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12 APPENDIX A Participants Diane Adger-Johnson, National Institute of Allergies and Infectious Diseases Susan Albertine, American Association of Colleges and Universities Bernice Alston, National Aeronautics and Space Administration Julie Angle, National Science Foundation Raymond Bartlett, Teaching Institute for Excellence in STEM Kirk Beckendorf, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Office of Education Robert Bell, National Science Foundation Mark Bloom, Biological Sciences Curriculum Study Takiema Bunche Smith, Sesame Workshop Michele Cahill, Carnegie Corporation of New York Claudia Campbell, National Science Resources Center Brian Carter, American Association for the Advancement of Science Fellow Ines Cifuentes, American Geophysical Union Charles Cox, U.S. Department of Labor Hanna Doerr, National Commission on Teaching and America’s Future Janice Earle, National Science Foundation Francis Eberle, National Science Teachers Association Elizabeth K. Eder, Smithsonian American Art Museum Curtis Ellis, House Committee on Education and Labor Charles Fadel, Cisco Systems, Inc. James Fey, National Science Foundation Paul Ford, National Institutes of Health Office of Science Education Jacob Foster, Massachusetts Department Education John Hall, Pennsylvania Alliance for STEM Education Peirce Hammond, U.S. Department of Education Scott Jackson, National Institutes of Health Sylvia James, National Science Foundation Brian Jones, JBS International, Inc. Jill Karsten, National Science Foundation Michael Kaspar, District of Columbia Public Schools John Kenny, Catholic University Mary Kirchhoff, American Chemical Society Miriam Lund, U.S. Department of Education David Mandel, Carnegie Foundation-Institute for Advanced Study Commission on Mathematics and Science Education Jacqueline Miller, Education Development Center Zipporah Miller, National Science Teachers Association Giuseppe (Pino) Monaco, Smithsonian Institution

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12 APPENDIX A Frank Niepold, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Climate Program Office Shilpi Niyogi, Pearson Education Douglas Oliver, National Science Foundation Geraldine Otremba, Library of Congress Eugene Owen, U.S. Department of Education Stephen Provasnick, U.S. Department of Education Linda Rosen, Education and Management Innovations, Inc. Jim Rosso, Project Tomorrow Gerhard Salinger, National Science Foundation Gina Schatteman, National Institutes of Health Reid Schwebach, National Research Council Board on Science Education Jean Slattery, National Science Teachers Association P. Gregory Smith, U.S. Department of Agriculture Larry Snowhite, McGraw-Hill Education Jaleh Soroui, American Institutes for Research James Sylvan, National Science Foundation Terri Taylor, American Chemical Society Audrey Trotman, U.S. Department of Agriculture Thomas Van Essen, Educational Testing Service Susan Van Gundy, National Science Digital Library Dave Vannier, National Institutes of Health Office of Science Education Bill Watson, Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History Richard Weibl, American Association for the Advancement of Science Brad Wiggins, U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration Joyce Winterton, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Office of Education Sarah Yue, National Science Foundation Lee Zia, National Science Foundation