Appendix D
Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

CHRISTOPHER T. HILL (Chair) is professor of public policy and technology at George Mason University. He has served on the professional staff at the National Academy of Engineering, the National Research Council, and the Congressional Research Service. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. His publications have been in the field of technological innovation and its impact on the economy, the impact of federal regulation on innovation, and the university perspective on issues of federal research and development (R&D) procurement. As vice provost for research, he oversaw completion of the National Science Foundation survey of academic R&D at George Mason University. He has a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Wisconsin.


WILLIAM B. BONVILLIAN is director of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s (MIT) Washington, DC, office. In that capacity he works to support MIT’s relations with federal research and development (R&D) agencies and its role on national science policy. Previously he served as legislative director and chief counsel to U.S. Senator Joseph Lieberman, working on science and technology policies and innovation issues. He worked extensively on legislation creating the Department of Homeland Security, on intelligence reform, on defense and life science R&D, and on national competitiveness and innovation legislation. He has also previously served as deputy assistant secretary and director of congressional affairs at the U.S. Department of Transportation. He has lectured and taught at Georgetown University and George Washington University and was the recipient of the IEEE Distinguished Public Service Award in 2007. For the National



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Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff CHRISTOPHER T. HILL (Chair) is professor of public policy and technol- ogy at George Mason University. He has served on the professional staff at the National Academy of Engineering, the National Research Council, and the Congressional Research Service. He is a fellow of the American Associa- tion for the Advancement of Science. His publications have been in the field of technological innovation and its impact on the economy, the impact of federal regulation on innovation, and the university perspective on issues of federal research and development (R&D) procurement. As vice provost for research, he oversaw completion of the National Science Foundation survey of academic R&D at George Mason University. He has a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Wisconsin. WILLIAM B. BONVILLIAN is director of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s (MIT) Washington, DC, office. In that capacity he works to support MIT’s relations with federal research and development (R&D) agencies and its role on national science policy. Previously he served as leg- islative director and chief counsel to U.S. Senator Joseph Lieberman, work- ing on science and technology policies and innovation issues. He worked extensively on legislation creating the Department of Homeland Security, on intelligence reform, on defense and life science R&D, and on national competitiveness and innovation legislation. He has also previously served as deputy assistant secretary and director of congressional affairs at the U.S. Department of Transportation. He has lectured and taught at George- town University and George Washington University and was the recipient of the IEEE Distinguished Public Service Award in 2007. For the National 0

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0 DATA ON FEDERAL RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT INVESTMENTS Research Council, he serves on the Board on Science Education. He has a B.A. from Columbia University, an M.A.R. from Yale Divinity School in religion; and a J.D. from Columbia Law School. KATY BÖRNER is the Victor H. Yngve professor of information science at the School of Library and Information Science at Indiana University. She is also adjunct professor in the School of Informatics, core faculty of cognitive science, research affiliate of the Biocomplexity Institute, fellow of the Center for Research on Learning and Technology, member of the Advanced Visualization Laboratory, and founding director of the Cyber- infrastructure for Network Science Center. Her research focuses on the development of data analysis and visualization techniques for information access, understanding, and management. She is particularly interested in the study of the structure and evolution of scientific disciplines, the analysis and visualization of online activity, and the development of cyberinfrastructures for large-scale scientific collaboration and computation. She is coeditor of Visual Interfaces to Digital Libraries and of a special issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on mapping knowledge domains. She has a Ph.D. from the University of Kaiserslautern in Germany (1997). MARY K. FEENEY is an assistant professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Her research specializes in public management, mentoring, outsourcing and contracting, and science and technology policy. Feeney’s work has been published in Administration & Society, the Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, Public Performance and Management Review, and Research Evaluation. She teaches courses in public manage- ment, nonprofit management, and survey research. She has a B.A. in politi- cal science from the University of Wyoming, an M.A. in public policy from Rutgers University, and a Ph.D. in public administration and policy from the University of Georgia. DAVID GOLDSTON is a visiting lecturer at the Harvard University Center for the Environment. Previously, he held a one-year appointment as a lec- turer in the Science, Technology and Environment Program at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, and he writes the monthly column “Party of One” on Congress and science policy for the journal Nature. From 2001 through 2006, he was chief of staff of the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Science, which has jurisdiction over much of the federal research and development budget. He was also a key player in most environmental debates in the House from 1995, when he became legislative director to Representative Sherwood Boehlert of New York, until the end of 2006, when he retired from gov- ernment service. For the National Research Council, he is a member of

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0 APPENDIX D the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board. He graduated from Cornell University and completed the course work for a Ph.D. in U.S. history at the University of Pennsylvania. NANCY J. KIRKENDALL served as director of the Statistics and Methods Group in the Energy Information Administration and was a member of the senior staff from 2002 to 2008, when she retired from federal ser- vice. From 1996 to 1999, she served as senior mathematical statistician in the Statistical Policy Branch of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs in the U.S. Office of Management and Budget. There she served as the desk officer for the U.S. Census Bureau, chaired the Federal Committee on Statistical Methodology, and led a variety of interagency activities. She taught part time at George Washington University in the Statistics Depart- ment from 1978 to 1996 and in the Engineering Management and Systems Engineering Department from 1996 to 2002. She is a past vice president of the American Statistical Association and a past president of the Washington Statistical Society. She has B.S. and M.S. degrees in mathematics from Ohio State University and a Ph.D. in statistics from George Washington University. JULIE THOMPSON KLEIN is professor of humanities in interdisciplinary studies/English and faculty fellow in the Office for Teaching and Learning at Wayne State University. She has also held visiting posts in Japan and New Zealand and was a Fulbright professor in Nepal and a senior fellow at the Association of American Colleges and Universities. Her area of expertise is interdisciplinary research and education. She received the Kenneth Boulding Award for outstanding scholarship on interdisciplinarity and has lectured and consulted throughout North America, Europe, Latin America, the South Pacific, and Asia. She is past president of the Association for Integra- tive Studies and former editor of its journal, Issues in Integrative Studies, and has served on national task forces and advised public and private agencies. She has a Ph.D. and undergraduate degrees in English from the University of Oregon. KEI KOIZUMI is assistant director for federal research and development (R&D) in the Office of Science and Technology Policy of the Executive Office of the President. Prior to assuming this position, he served as direc- tor of R&D budget and policy programs at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). His expertise focuses on the federal budget, federal support for research and development, science policy issues, and R&D funding data. At the AAAS, he was the principal budget analyst, editor, and writer for the annual AAAS reports on federal R&D and for the continually updated analyses of federal R&D on the organization’s R&D

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0 DATA ON FEDERAL RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT INVESTMENTS website. He is widely quoted in the general and trade press on federal science funding issues and speaks on R&D funding trends and federal budget policy toward R&D to numerous public groups and seminars. He has an M.A. from the Center for International Science at George Washington University and a B.A. from Boston University in political science and economics. THOMAS J. PLEWES (Study Director) is a senior program officer for the Committee on National Statistics and was study director for an earlier National Research Council study of research and development statistics at the National Science Foundation. Previously he was associate commis- sioner for employment and unemployment statistics of the Bureau of Labor Statistics and served as chief of the U.S. Army Reserve. He was a member of the Federal Committee on Statistical Methodology. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association. He has a B.A. in economics from Hope College and an M.A. in economics from George Washington University. J. DAVID ROESSNER is associate director of the Science and Technology Policy Program at SRI International and professor of public policy emeritus at Georgia Institute of Technology. Prior to joining the Georgia Tech faculty in 1980, he was principal scientist and group manager for industrial policy and planning at the Solar Energy Research Institute in Golden, Colorado. He served as policy analyst with the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) research and development assessment program and, subsequently, as acting leader of the working group on innovation processes and their manage- ment in the Division of Policy Research and Analysis at NSF. Since 2003, he has been senior evaluation consultant to the National Academies Keck Futures Initiative, a 15-year, $40 million program to foster interdisciplin- ary research in the United States. His research interests include national technology policy, the evaluation of research programs, management of innovation in industry, technology transfer, and indicators of scientific and technological development. He has B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering from Brown University and Stanford University, respectively, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in science, technology, and public policy from Case Western Reserve University. MARTHA M. TAYLOR is assistant vice president for research and the director of the Office of Sponsored Programs, the preaward and non- financial postaward branch of Auburn University. She came to Auburn in 1989 as a database consultant and then served as assistant director after 3.5 years with the Texas A&M Research Foundation, working in the areas of postaward management and subcontracting. In her position, she is responsible for developing the data on research activities at Auburn to meet the National Science Foundation reporting requirements. Prior to her

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0 APPENDIX D time in Texas, she worked as a contracts technician for Environmental Sci- ences and Engineering, Inc. (now QST Environmental), an environmental engineering firm in Gainesville, Florida. She is a member of the National Council of University Research Administrators and the primary representa- tive for Auburn University with the Council on Governmental Relations. She graduated with honors from the University of Florida with a B.S. in business administration.

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