Appendix A
Committee Member Biographies

Susan Berkowitz (Chair), a Senior Study Director at Westat, is a recognized expert in mixed method evaluation design and implementation as well as analysis of qualitative data who currently chairs Westat's Evaluation Working Group. During her nearly 20-year career at Westat, Dr. Berkowitz has led studies of higher education policies and programs, military and civilian health services and health delivery systems, clinical research networks, patient participation in medical decision making, health communication campaigns, public-private partnerships, youth career decision-making and military propensity and interventions aimed at high-risk, abused and neglected children and frail, low income elderly. She has delivered technical assistance in evaluation design and implementation to National Science Foundation and Office of Special Education grantees and given training and professional development workshops to a variety of audiences. Dr. Berkowitz wrote a widely cited chapter on qualitative data analysis for The User-Friendly Guide to Mixed Method Evaluations (NSF: 1997) and co-edited and co-authored Needs Assessment: A Creative and Practical Guide for Social Scientists (Taylor and Francis: 1996). She is a frequent presenter at national and international meetings.


Kevin Bales is president of Free the Slaves (www.freetheslaves.net), the United States sister organization of Anti-Slavery International, and Professor Emeritus of Sociology at Roehampton University London and Visiting Professor at the Wilberforce Institute for the Study of Slavery and Emancipation, University of Hull. His book Disposable People: New Slavery in the Global Economy was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, and published in 10 languages. Desmond Tutu called it “a well researched, scholarly and deeply disturbing expose of modern slavery.” In 2008, Utne Reader named Dr. Bales as one of “50 visionaries who are changing your world.” In 2006 his work was named one of the top “100 World-Changing Discoveries” by the Association of British Universities. He won the Viareggio Prize for services to humanity in 2000. The film based on Disposable People, which he co-wrote, won a Peabody Award and two Emmy Awards. He was awarded the Laura Smith Davenport Human Rights Award in 2005; the Judith Sargeant Murray Award for Human Rights in 2004; and the Human Rights Award of the University of Alberta in 2003. He was a consultant to the United Nations Global Program on Human Trafficking. Dr. Bales has advised the United States, British, Irish, Norwegian, and Nepali governments, as well as the ECOWAS Community, on slavery and human trafficking policy. In 2008 he was invited to address the Summit of Nobel Peace Laureates in Paris. He is currently writing a book on the relationship of slavery and environmental destruction; and with Jody Sarich, a book exploring forced marriage worldwide. He earned his Ph.D. at the London School of Economics.


Donna E. Chung is a Trade and Labor Compliance Advisor at Sandler, Travis & Rosenberg, P.A., and heads the firm’s corporate social responsibility practice. Before joining ST&R, Dr. Chung worked in the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Child Labor, Forced Labor and Human Trafficking, managing child labor elimination projects



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 71
Appendix A Committee Member Biographies Susan Berkowitz (Chair), a Senior Study Director at Westat, is a recognized expert in mixed method evaluation design and implementation as well as analysis of qualitative data who currently chairs Westat's Evaluation Working Group. During her nearly 20-year career at Westat, Dr. Berkowitz has led studies of higher education policies and programs, military and civilian health services and health delivery systems, clinical research networks, patient participation in medical decision making, health communication campaigns, public-private partnerships, youth career decision-making and military propensity and interventions aimed at high-risk, abused and neglected children and frail, low income elderly. She has delivered technical assistance in evaluation design and implementation to National Science Foundation and Office of Special Education grantees and given training and professional development workshops to a variety of audiences. Dr. Berkowitz wrote a widely cited chapter on qualitative data analysis for The User-Friendly Guide to Mixed Method Evaluations (NSF: 1997) and co- edited and co-authored Needs Assessment: A Creative and Practical Guide for Social Scientists (Taylor and Francis: 1996). She is a frequent presenter at national and international meetings. Kevin Bales is president of Free the Slaves (www.freetheslaves.net), the United States sister organization of Anti-Slavery International, and Professor Emeritus of Sociology at Roehampton University London and Visiting Professor at the Wilberforce Institute for the Study of Slavery and Emancipation, University of Hull. His book Disposable People: New Slavery in the Global Economy was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, and published in 10 languages. Desmond Tutu called it “a well researched, scholarly and deeply disturbing expose of modern slavery.” In 2008, Utne Reader named Dr. Bales as one of “50 visionaries who are changing your world.” In 2006 his work was named one of the top “100 World-Changing Discoveries” by the Association of British Universities. He won the Viareggio Prize for services to humanity in 2000. The film based on Disposable People, which he co-wrote, won a Peabody Award and two Emmy Awards. He was awarded the Laura Smith Davenport Human Rights Award in 2005; the Judith Sargeant Murray Award for Human Rights in 2004; and the Human Rights Award of the University of Alberta in 2003. He was a consultant to the United Nations Global Program on Human Trafficking. Dr. Bales has advised the United States, British, Irish, Norwegian, and Nepali governments, as well as the ECOWAS Community, on slavery and human trafficking policy. In 2008 he was invited to address the Summit of Nobel Peace Laureates in Paris. He is currently writing a book on the relationship of slavery and environmental destruction; and with Jody Sarich, a book exploring forced marriage worldwide. He earned his Ph.D. at the London School of Economics. Donna E. Chung is a Trade and Labor Compliance Advisor at Sandler, Travis & Rosenberg, P.A., and heads the firm’s corporate social responsibility practice. Before joining ST&R, Dr. Chung worked in the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Child Labor, Forced Labor and Human Trafficking, managing child labor elimination projects 71

OCR for page 71
72 APPENDIX A in Latin America and the Caribbean. Dr. Chung's doctoral research focused on international labor standards and CSR in China’s apparel and footwear industries. Her research also included the creation of a framework for understanding CSR in the context of free trade agreements and U.S. trade policy. Dr. Chung serves as adjunct professor at the American University’s School of International Service and teaches a master’s course on international policy analysis. She also serves as advisor to SISHA, a Cambodia-based nongovernmental organization that fights human trafficking and sexual exploitation in Southeast Asia, and as a member of the National Academy of Science’s Committee on Reducing Forced and Child Labor. She is fluent in Korean and has a working knowledge of Spanish. Dr. Chung has a Ph.D. and M.Phil in international relations from Oxford University and a B.A. in ethics, politics, and economics from Yale University. Eric Edmonds joined the faculty at Dartmouth in 1999. Currently, he is an associate professor of Economics. He is director of the Child Labor Network at the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research, a research fellow at IZA, and an associate editor at Economic Development and Cultural Change. His research focuses on improving our empirical understanding of the reasons for the prevalence and persistence of child labor, illiteracy, and low levels of schooling attainment in low income countries. Dr. Edmonds received his Ph.D. in Economics from Princeton University and a M.A. and B.A. in Economics from the University of Chicago. Adam Greene is vice president, Labor Affairs and Corporate Responsibility at the U.S. Council for International Business. He is responsible for USCIB’s activities on labor policy as well as our wide-ranging work on corporate responsibility. He manages U.S. business participation in the development of international labor standards and advises companies on international and regional trends in labor and employment policy. He also coordinates USCIB involvement in the governing and standard setting bodies of the International Labor Organization and promotes the ILO Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work. He is vice chairman of the Business Technical Advisory Committee on Labor Affairs to the Inter-American Conference of Ministers of Labor. In the area of corporate responsibility, Mr. Greene advises clients on international codes and initiatives, internal management systems, strategic alliances and corporate reporting, among other things. He is a member of the ISO Working Group on Social Responsibility and Co-Chair of the Industry Stakeholder Group, and is a member of the U.S. Advisory Committee for the FTSE4Good social investment index. Mr. Greene is actively involved in the ongoing implementation of the OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises, the ILO Tripartite Declaration on Multinational Enterprises and Social Policy, and a wide array of other international initiatives. Beryl Levinger, since 1992, has held the appointment of Distinguished Professor of Nonprofit Management at the Monterey Institute where she also serves as Academic Director of the Development Project Management Institute (DPMI). Prior to joining the Institute’s faculty, she held significant leadership positions in international nongovernmental organizations (NGOs): president of AFS Intercultural Programs; senior vice president of CARE; and senior adviser to Save the Children’s president. From 1992

OCR for page 71
APPENDIX A 73 until 2007, Beryl also directed the Center for Organizational Learning and Development at the Education Development Center. Center clients include NGOs, governments, and multilateral institutions seeking to craft new strategies, develop greater capacity, or achieve organizational transformation. Beryl is a former vice chair and a founder of InterAction, the coalition of 175 U.S.-based international NGOs focused on the world’s poor and most vulnerable people. She has written extensively on capacity building and development. Her books include Togetherness: Intersectoral Partnering in Latin America; Critical Transitions: Human Capacity Development Across the Lifespan; and Nutrition, Health, and Education for All. Since 1999, Dr. Beryl has been research director for the State of the World’s Mothers Report, an annual policy-oriented publication supported by Save the Children. Dr. Beryl has been appointed to serve on a number of prestigious expert groups. Current or recent panel memberships include: Ending Child Hunger (sponsored by the World Food Programme); Standards for Educational Administrators (sponsored by the National Policy Board for Educational Administration and the Council of Chief State School Officers); and the World Bank’s Development Gateway Advisory Group Beryl received her M.A. and Ph.D. in educational planning and administration from the University of Alabama. Her undergraduate degree in the social sciences was awarded by Cornell University. Dan Viederman is executive director of VERITÉ. Since first going to China as an educator in 1985, Mr. Viederman has passionately pursued partnerships between international NGOs and domestic institutions in China and Southeast Asia. He has lived in Asia for ten of the past twenty years, guiding international nongovernmental organizations into effective support for social change and sustainable institution building. Since becoming executive director of Verité in 2004, hen has led the expansion of global capacity and the establishment of formal partnerships with NGOs and Regional Offices around the world. This structure recognizes that sustainable change requires strong local institutions, and leverages Verité's global strength and corporate relationships to support our in-country partners. Under Mr. Viederman’s leadership Verité has become a recognized source for thoughtful commentary on the impacts of globalization on workers around the world. . Mr. Viederman was previously CEO of the China Program for WWF- World Wildlife Fund, where he established the Beijing office for the first international environmental NGO in China. In that role he worked extensively with government and private sector institutions to support conservation outcomes, linking on-the-ground understanding with national policy goals, and providing key strategic leadership to the first Chinese environmental and corporate responsibility NGOs. A graduate of Yale University, he has a Master's Degree in International Affairs from Columbia University and a certificate in Chinese language from Nanjing Teacher's University. He was a San Francisco Coro Foundation Fellow, and serves on the Boards of Clean Air-Cool Planet, Dwight Hall at Yale and as Chair of the Educational Opportunities Fund.