interannual and decadal extreme events to effectively prevent and respond to domestic and international food crises.

SHARED RESOURCES AND ECOLOGICAL SERVICES

The United States shares not only water across our borders (Figure 7.2), but also fisheries, migrating species (birds, whales, waterfowl, etc.), and many ecosystem services (such as flood control by buffer areas and wetlands filtration of pollutants). As climate change makes resources harder to manage, and growing populations increase demand, countries will need to cooperate more intensively to manage international waters, forests, wildlife, and fisheries (SEG, 2007). Thus, the United States must provide and procure information across borders, making sharing of real-time data more important. For example, changes in the timing and availability of water will affect agricultural production, sanitation, drinking-water quality and cost, water supply reliability, ecosys-

FIGURE 7.2 The San Pedro River watershed is an example of shared water resources across our borders. SOURCE: Dale Turner and The Nature Conservancy; TNC (2010).

FIGURE 7.2 The San Pedro River watershed is an example of shared water resources across our borders. SOURCE: Dale Turner and The Nature Conservancy; TNC (2010).



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