• What roles can federal, state, and local governments and other groups (e.g, the academic community) play in providing effective “climate services”—the timely production and delivery of information, data, and knowledge to decision makers affected by climate?

  • What information and tools (e.g., monitoring, metrics, integrated assessment models, etc.) do we need to evaluate the progress of different responses to climate change?

  • How can decisions and actions related to climate change be made more flexible and responsive to changing conditions and new information?

  • What can current efforts and past experiences (both failures and successes) teach us about responding effectively to climate change?

The panel will be challenged to produce a report that is broad and authoritative, yet concise and useful to decision makers. The costs, benefits, limitations, tradeoffs, and uncertainties associated with different options and strategies should be assessed qualitatively and, to the extent practicable, quantitatively, using the scenarios of future climate change and vulnerability developed in coordination with the Committee on America’s Climate Choices and the other study panels. The panel should also provide policy-relevant (but not policy-prescriptive) input to the committee on the following overarching questions:

  • What short-term actions can be taken to better inform decisions and actions related to climate change?

  • What promising long-term strategies, investments, and opportunities could be pursued to better inform decisions and actions related to climate change?

  • What are the major scientific and technological advances (e.g., new observations, improved models, research programs, etc.) needed to better inform decisions and actions related to climate change?

  • What are the major impediments (e.g., practical, institutional, economic, ethical, intergenerational, etc.) to effectively informing decisions and actions related to climate change, and what can be done to overcome these impediments?

  • What can be done to more effectively inform decisions and actions related to climate change at different levels (e.g., local, state, regional, national, and in collaboration with the international community) and in different sectors (e.g., nongovernmental organizations, the business community, the research and academic communities, individuals and households, etc.)?



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement