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Committee Biographies

R. Palmer Beasley, MD (Chair), is the Ashbel Smith Professor and dean emeritus of the University of Texas School of Public Health at Houston. Previously, Dr. Beasley was a member of the faculty of the Department of Epidemiology at the University of Washington and the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. The focus of his research has been the hepatitis B virus. His contributions to the field include discovery of mother-to-infant transmission of the hepatitis B virus, establishing that the hepatitis B virus is the major cause of liver cancer, and a series of clinical trials that established the effectiveness and strategies for the use of hepatitis B vaccine for the prevention of perinatal transmission. Dr. Beasley has won many awards for his work, including the Charles F. Mott General Motors International Prize for Research on Cancer, the Prince Mahidol Award for Medicine (Thailand), and the Health Medal of the First Order (Taiwan). He has served on numerous national and international government advisory panels on viral hepatitis and is chair of the Association of Schools of Public Health. He also served on the National Academies Committee on the Middle East Regional Infectious Disease Research Program and Committee on the Assessment of Future Scientific Needs for Variola Virus and on the Public Health and Biotechnology Review Panel. Dr. Beasley received his MD from Harvard School of Medicine, and his MS in preventative medicine from the University of Washington.


Harvey J. Alter, MD, is chief of clinical studies and associate director for research in the Department of Transfusion Medicine at the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Alter’s research interest is in viral hepatitis and the safety



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A Committee Biographies R. Palmer Beasley, MD (Chair), is the Ashbel Smith Professor and dean emeritus of the University of Texas School of Public Health at Houston. Previously, Dr. Beasley was a member of the faculty of the Department of Epidemiology at the University of Washington and the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. The focus of his research has been the hepatitis B virus. His contributions to the field include discovery of mother-to-infant transmission of the hepatitis B virus, establishing that the hepatitis B virus is the major cause of liver cancer, and a series of clinical trials that established the effectiveness and strategies for the use of hepatitis B vaccine for the prevention of perinatal transmission. Dr. Beasley has won many awards for his work, including the Charles F. Mott General Motors International Prize for Research on Cancer, the Prince Mahidol Award for Medicine (Thailand), and the Health Medal of the First Order (Taiwan). He has served on numerous national and international government advisory panels on viral hepatitis and is chair of the Associa- tion of Schools of Public Health. He also served on the National Acad- emies Committee on the Middle East Regional Infectious Disease Research Program and Committee on the Assessment of Future Scientific Needs for Variola Virus and on the Public Health and Biotechnology Review Panel. Dr. Beasley received his MD from Harvard School of Medicine, and his MS in preventative medicine from the University of Washington. Harvey J. Alter, MD, is chief of clinical studies and associate director for re- search in the Department of Transfusion Medicine at the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Alter’s research interest is in viral hepatitis and the safety 0

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0 HEPATITIS AND LIVER CANCER of the blood supply. He was a major contributor in the fight to reduce the incidence of transfusion-induced viral hepatitis, and he collaborated in the discovery of hepatitis C and described its natural history. He is a member of IOM and NAS. For his contributions, Dr. Alter has been awarded the US Pubic Health Service Distinguished Service Medal, the Landsteiner Prize, the Presidential Award of the International Society of Blood Transfusion, the James Blundell Award of the British Blood Transfusion Society, and the Distinguished Scientist Awards of both the Hepatitis B Foundation and the American Liver Foundation, and he was elected to fellowship in the American Association of Physicians. He was the corecipient of the 2000 Clinical Lasker Award and was made a master of the American College of Physicians. In 2007, he was named Distinguished NIH Investigator. Dr. Alter received his MD from the University of Rochester. Margaret L. Brandeau, PhD, is a professor in the Department of Manage- ment Science and Engineering of Stanford University. She also holds a cour- tesy appointment in the Department of Medicine of the same institution. Dr. Brandeau is an operations researcher and policy analyst with extensive background in the development of applied mathematical and economic models. She has conducted research on HIV, focusing on mathematical and economic models to assess the value of different HIV and drug-abuse inter- ventions, and on hepatitis B screening and vaccination policies. She received her PhD in engineering and economic systems from Stanford University. Daniel R. Church, MPH, is the adult viral hepatitis prevention coordinator and an epidemiologist in the Division of Epidemiology and Immunization of the Massachusetts Department of Health. He coordinates the statewide viral hepatitis program, including disease surveillance; medical-management services; counseling and testing programs; adult vaccination programs; edu- cational campaigns for providers, patients, and communities; and evalu- ation of projects. Mr. Church received his MPH in epidemiology and biostatistics from the Boston University School of Public Health. Alison A. Evans, ScD, is an assistant professor in the Department of Epide- miology and Biostatistics of the Drexel University School of Public Health. She is also the director of public-health research in the Hepatitis B Foun- dation, Doylestown, PA, and is an adjunct associate member of the Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia, PA. Her research interests include the epidemiology and natural history of the hepatitis B virus and other chronic viral infections. She received her ScD in epidemiology from the Harvard School of Public Health.

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 APPENDIX A Holly Hagan, PhD, MPH, is a senior research scientist in the New York University College of Nursing, deputy director of the Center for Drug Use and HIV Research, and director of the center’s Interdisciplinary Research Methods Core. Previously, she was deputy director of the Institute for AIDS Research in the National Development and Research Institutes. She was a senior epidemiologist in the Department of Public Health in Seattle, WA. Her broad research interest is in the etiology and prevention of hepatitis C and other bloodborne viral infections in drug users and other high-risk populations; her work has also examined drug users’ access to screening and health care. Dr. Hagan has served on several national government ad- visory groups, including the steering committee for the National Institutes of Health hepatitis C vaccine trial. She received her MPH in epidemiology from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst School of Public Health and her PhD in epidemiology from the University of Washington School of Public Health and Community Medicine. Sandral Hullett, MD, MPH, is the chief executive officer and medical direc- tor of the Jefferson Health System, which consists of Cooper Green–Mercy Hospital and Jefferson Outpatient Care. Jefferson Health System’s primary focus is service to the underserved populations of Jefferson County, AL. Previously, Dr. Hullett was the executive director of Family HealthCare of Alabama, which is headquartered in Eutaw, Alabama, and provided ser- vices to patients of west central Alabama. She has an interest in rural health care, including health-care planning and delivery to the underserved, un- derinsured, and poor; and she has extensive experience in research, clinical trials, community outreach, and teaching of direct care delivery. Dr. Hullett is a member of IOM and has served on several IOM committees, including committees that produced America’s Health Care Safety Net: Intact but En- dangered; Quality Through Collaboration: The Future of Rural Health; and Measuring What Matters: Allocation, Planning, and Quality Assessment for the Ryan White CARE Act; the Planning Committee for a Workshop on Military Medical Ethics: Issues Regarding Dual Loyalties; and the Com- mittee on Human Rights of NAS, NAE, and IOM. She has received many awards and honors, including the Rural Practitioner of the Year Award in 1988 from the National Rural Health Association, the Clinical Recogni- tion Award for Education and Training from the National Association of Community Health Centers in 1993, the Public Health Hero Award for Year 2000 from the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Public Health, the National Medical Fellowship in 2001, Lifetime Achievement of Women in Health Care from Rutgers University in 2002, and the Local Legends Award from the American Medical Women’s Association in Febru- ary 2004. She received her MD from the Medical College of Pennsylvania and her MPH from the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

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 HEPATITIS AND LIVER CANCER Stacene R. Maroushek, MD, PhD, MPH, is a staff pediatrician at Henne- pin County Medical Center in Minneapolis, MN. She is also an assistant professor in the Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases of the University of Minnesota. Dr. Maroushek works with immigrant pediatric patients and has published extensively on medical evaluation and screening of immigrant children for infectious diseases. She received her MD, her PhD in microbiol- ogy, and her MPH from the University of Minnesota. Randall R. Mayer, MS, MPH, is an epidemiologist and chief of the Bureau of HIV, STD, and Hepatitis in the Iowa Department of Public Health. He provides oversight for HIV, sexually trasmitted disease (STD), and hepatitis prevention, care, and surveillance activities, including disease reporting, counseling and testing, risk-reduction programs, partner services, com- munity planning, adult immunizations for hepatitis A and hepatitis B, HIV case management and support services, and HIV and STD drug-treatment assistance programs. While working with the Iowa Department of Public Health, Mr. Mayer has served as the HIV/AIDS/Hepatitis Program man- ager and as the HIV/AIDS surveillance coordinator. He received his MPH in epidemiology from the University of Minnesota and his MS in plant cell physiology from Purdue University. Brian J. McMahon, MD, is medical director of the liver disease and hepa- titis program at the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium and a clini- cal hepatologist at the Alaska Native Medical Center. He was previously employed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Alaska. Dr. McMahon has worked to reduce the rate of hepatitis B in the native Alaskan population, which went from one of the highest in the world to one of the lowest. He provides clinical care for patients who have viral hepatitis and liver disease and conducts research in population-epidemiol- ogy hepatitis and liver disease. He has served as a consultant on viral hepa- titis issues to the World Health Organization and other international and national organizations. Dr. McMahon received the Assistant Secretary for Health Award for Exceptional Achievement in 1985; the Alvan R. Feinstein Memorial Award from the American College of Physicians in 2003 for the Program to Control Hepatitis B in Alaska Natives; and the 2009 Scientist of the Year from the Hepatitis B Foundation for notable contributions in clinical epidemiology regarding research on and control of hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C in Alaska natives. He was elected a master in the American College of Physicians. He received his MD from the Univer- sity of Washington. Martín J. Sepúlveda, MD, FACP, is IBM Fellow and vice president of integrated health services for the International Business Machines Cor-

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 APPENDIX A poration. His research interests and health-care reform initiatives include patient-centered primary care and medical homes, care management and coordination, total health management, workplace health promotion, risk- reduction program measurement, value-based health-care purchasing, and global occupational and health services delivery. He is a fellow of the IBM Corporation, the American College of Physicians, the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, and the American College of Preventive Medicine. Dr. Sepúlveda was recently chosen as an IBM Fel- low, IBM’s highest technical achievement; was awarded honorary mem- bership in the American Academy of Family Physicians; and received the John D. Thompson Distinguished Fellow Award from Yale University and the Distinguished Alumnus Award for Professional Achievement from the University of Iowa. His team has received numerous national and interna- tional awards in health care, health promotion, and occupational health and safety. He serves on the IOM Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice, the Board of Directors of the Employee Benefits Research Institute, the Board of Advisors to the School of Public Health of the Uni- versity of Iowa, and the Board of the National Business Group on Health; and he chairs the Global Health Benefits Institute. He received his MD and MPH from Harvard University. Samuel So, MB, BS, is a professor of surgery and the Lui Hac Minh Profes- sor at Stanford University. He is also the director of the Asian Liver Center and director of the Multidisciplinary Liver Cancer Program at the same institution. He has published numerous studies on solid-organ transplanta- tion and gastric and liver cancers. Dr. So is well known for his work on hepatitis B and liver-cancer education and prevention programs. Through his research, Dr. So has identified the need for a public-health approach to liver-cancer prevention in recent Asian immigrants and first- and second- generation Asians living in the United States. Those populations have not been the typical focus of US screening and prevention programs. Dr. So is listed in The Best Doctors in America, published by Woodward/White, Inc. For his work in education and prevention, he received the 2005 National Leadership Award from the New York University Center for the Study of Asian American Health, the 2008 American Liver Foundation Salute to Excellence Award, and the 2009 Asian Pacific Islander Heritage Award from the California Asian Pacific Islander Joint Legislative Caucus. He is a member of IOM’s Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice. Dr. So received his MB and his BS in medicine and surgery from the Uni- versity of Hong Kong and did postdoctoral and clinical fellowships at the University of Minnesota.

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 HEPATITIS AND LIVER CANCER David L. Thomas, MD, MPH, is chief of the Division of Infectious Dis- eases, Department of Medicine, of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. He is also a professor in the Department of Epidemiology in the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. His broad research interest is viral hepatitis, and current research projects include the progression of hepatitis C in injection-drug users, hepatitis C pathogenesis and the host genome, and antiviral therapy for HIV–hepatitis C virus coinfection. Dr. Thomas received his MD from the West Virginia School of Medicine and his MPH from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. Lester N. Wright, MD, MPH, is the deputy commissioner and chief medical officer for the New York Department of Correctional Services. He oversees health care for some 62,000 residents in 70 facilities, who currently include about 4,500 HIV-positive patients and 8,000 who have hepatitis C virus infection. Before his employment in the New York Department of Correc- tional Services, Dr. Wright worked in several state and county health de- partments, including the Virginia Department of Health and the Delaware Public Health Division. He spent 7 years working in Africa on delivery of primary health care and health-system development. He has served on two National Academies committees: the Committee on Regulating Occu- pational Exposure to Tuberculosis and the Committee on the Elimination of Tuberculosis in the United States. Dr. Wright received his MD from the Loma Linda University School of Medicine and his MPH from the Harvard School of Public Health.