Appendix H
Committee Biographies

Claire V. Broome, M.D. (Chair), is currently an adjunct professor in the Department of Global Health at the Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University. Previously she held several positions at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) including senior adviser, Integrated Health Information Systems (2000-2006); deputy director (1994-1999); acting director (1998); acting director, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (1991-1993); associate director for science (1990-1994); and chief, Bacterial Special Pathogens Branch, National Center for Infectious Diseases (1981-1990). Dr. Broome has served as an adviser for the following institutions: World Health Organization; World Bank; Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization; The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; Burroughs Wellcome Fund; the Wellcome Trust; U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID); the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) (member, Vaccines and Related Biologicals Advisory Committee); and the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Dr. Broome’s research experience includes developing and implementing research programs in bacterial disease epidemiology, observational epidemiology for vaccine evaluation, and public health surveillance methodology. She also has informatics experience, including leading the development and implementation of the National Electronic Disease Surveillance System. Dr. Broome has received numerous honors and awards including Infectious Disease Society of America’s Squibb Award for Excellence of Achievement in Infectious Diseases; American Public Health Association Epidemiology Section’s John Snow Award; U.S. Public Health Service (PHS) Distinguished Service Medal; Surgeon General’s Medallion; Charles Shepard Award 1986; and Langmuir award



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Appendix H Committee Biographies Claire V. Broome, M.D. (Chair), is currently an adjunct professor in the Department of Global Health at the Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University. Previously she held several positions at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) including senior adviser, Integrated Health Information Systems (2000-2006); deputy director (1994-1999); acting director (1998); acting director, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (1991-1993); associate director for science (1990-1994); and chief, Bacterial Special Pathogens Branch, National Center for Infectious Diseases (1981-1990). Dr. Broome has served as an adviser for the follow- ing institutions: World Health Organization; World Bank; Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization; The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; Burroughs Wellcome Fund; the Wellcome Trust; U.S. Agency for Inter- national Development (USAID); the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) (member, Vaccines and Related Biologicals Advisory Committee); and the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Dr. Broome’s research experi- ence includes developing and implementing research programs in bacterial disease epidemiology, observational epidemiology for vaccine evaluation, and public health surveillance methodology. She also has informatics experi- ence, including leading the development and implementation of the National Electronic Disease Surveillance System. Dr. Broome has received numer- ous honors and awards including Infectious Disease Society of America’s Squibb Award for Excellence of Achievement in Infectious Diseases; Ameri- can Public Health Association Epidemiology Section’s John Snow Award; U.S. Public Health Service (PHS) Distinguished Service Medal; Surgeon General’s Medallion; Charles Shepard Award 1986; and Langmuir award 

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0 PRIORITIES FOR THE NATIONAL VACCINE PLAN coauthor in 1981, 1983, 1988, 1989, 1993; she is a member of the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Broome received her B.A. from Harvard University and her M.D. from Harvard Medical School; she specialized in internal medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. She was a CDC Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) officer and completed a fellowship in infectious diseases at Massachusetts General Hospital. Élaine Chatigny is director general, Communications, at the Public Health Agency of Canada. She is responsible for risk communications, crisis com- munications, strategic communication planning, media relations, social marketing, and a host of other communication functions. Her previous position with the government of Canada was director, Public Affairs, with the Communications, Marketing, and Consultation Directorate at Health Canada. In her 8 years with the government of Canada, Ms. Chatigny has established Crisis and Emergency Communications and Risk Com- munications Units. She was also responsible for the development of Health Canada’s and the Public Health Agency of Canada’s Risk Communications Framework and Handbook, which is unique to the government of Canada. Ms. Chatigny has been an external adviser to the World Health Organiza- tion on pandemic influenza communications planning and co-chair of the Communicators’ Network of the Global Health Security Initiative (G7 plus Mexico); she is the founder of a federal, provincial, and territorial commu- nications working group on pandemic influenza, which reports to Canada’s Pandemic Influenza Committee. Prior to joining the federal government, Ms. Chatigny worked 14 years with the Canadian Broadcasting Corpora- tion as a journalist and a manager. Jocelyn Guyer, M.P.A., is co-executive director at the Center for Children and Families (CCF) and a senior researcher at the Georgetown University Health Policy Institute. At CCF, she has worked extensively on child and family health issues, including reauthorization of the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) and the role of Medicaid in covering children and families. She joined CCF from the Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured, where she served most recently as an associate director. At the commission, she led analysis of several emerging issues in health care for vulnerable Americans, including the implications of the Part D Medicare drug benefit for impoverished seniors and people with disabilities, and major proposals to restructure Medicaid. In the past, she has served as a senior health policy analyst on health and welfare policy at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, where she designed policy initiatives to expand cover- age to low-income parents and worked with several states to implement family-based coverage expansions. She also served as legislative research assistant to Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan. She holds an M.P.A. in

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 APPENDIX H economics and public policy from Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School and a B.A. in political science from Brown University. Timothy J. Hoff, Ph.D., is associate professor of health policy and manage- ment in the Department of Health Policy, Management, and Behavior at the Statte University of New York (SUNY) at Albany. Dr. Hoff received his B.S. in business administration from SUNY Albany and his Ph.D. in public administration and policy from the Rockefeller College of Public Affairs and Policy. His areas of expertise include strategic planning and evaluation, health care policy, medical sociology, primary care delivery, organization theory and behavior, organizational change and innovation, organizational design, and public health genomics. Dr. Hoff’s current research focuses on the evolution of primary care medicine, newborn screening policy in the United States, and the redesign of healthcare delivery settings for more ef- fective chronic disease management. Recently, he was engaged in patient safety research examining the role of organizational culture in creating safer clinical environments. He also has completed a national study of state newborn screening programs and issues related to long-term follow-up of newborns identified with genetic and metabolic disorders. This research is unique nationally and is adding to our understanding of quality and access issues in the area of newborn screening. He was the chair of the Health Care Management Division of the Academy of Management, the leading academic organization in the United States for management scholars, and a two-time winner of the SUNY Albany School of Public Health’s Excellence in Teaching Award. Grace M. Lee, M.D., M.P.H., is an assistant professor of population medi- cine and pediatrics at the Harvard Medical School, Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, and Children’s Hospital Boston. Dr. Lee’s research focuses on vaccine economics, vaccine safety, infectious disease epidemiology, and infection control and prevention. She is currently principal investigator or coinvestigator on Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)-, NIH-, and CDC-funded studies. Several key research projects include con- ducting active surveillance of H1N1 and seasonal influenza vaccine safety in the United States, understanding gaps in the vaccine financing and delivery system, modeling the cost-effectiveness of vaccines and interventions to reduce health care–associated infections, and evaluating the impact of Medicare’s policy of nonpayment for health care–associated infections in hospital settings. Dr. Lee joined the faculty at Harvard Medical School, Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, and Children’s Hospital Boston in 2003 after completing an AHRQ postdoctoral fellowship. She received her M.D. at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and M.P.H. at Harvard School of Public Health. She completed her pediatric residency and

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 PRIORITIES FOR THE NATIONAL VACCINE PLAN subspecialty training in pediatric infectious diseases and pediatric health services research at Children’s Hospital Boston. Richard Mandsager, M.D., is chief executive at Providence Alaska Medi- cal Center and was the executive director of the Children’s Hospital at Providence in Anchorage from October 2006 to August 2009. From 2004 to 2006, he was the director of public health for the State of Alaska. Dur- ing his tenure, legislative support and funding were achieved for purchase, implementation, and operation of an immunization registry. Prior to that, he was medical director of the Pediatric Service Center of Alaska Native Medical Center (ANMC) in Anchorage. While he was in that position the ANMC achieved more than a 90 percent immunization rate for children. His prior experience includes serving as staff pediatrician for Southcentral Foundation, where he revised and improved protocols for medical care for children and adolescents. Dr. Mandsager has also served as the past direc- tor for the Alaska Native Medical Center and service unit director for the Anchorage Service Unit. He led and facilitated completion of the ANMC hospital campus, which was the largest project in the history of the Indian Health Service and the first joint construction project of the Indian Health Service and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. He retired from the Commissioned Corps of the U.S. Public Health Service with the rank of an assistant surgeon general. Edgar K. Marcuse, M.D., M.P.H., is a professor of pediatrics and adjunct professor of epidemiology at the University of Washington Schools of Medicine and Public Health and associate medical director for quality improvement at Seattle Children’s. Dr. Marcuse has been actively involved with numerous pediatric and public health organization immunization ac- tivities at the local, regional, and national levels. Nationally, he served as member and chair of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Service’s (HHS’s) National Vaccine Advisory Committee, a member of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, a member of the American Acad- emy of Pediatrics (AAP) Committee on Infectious Disease (Red Book), an associate editor and consultant for several editions of the Red Book, and chair of the AAP Immunization Advisory Team. He is coeditor of AAP Grand Rounds. Dr. Marcuse received his B.A. from Oberlin Col- lege in Ohio, his M.D. from Stanford University School of Medicine, his M.P.H. from the University of Washington School of Public Health and Community Medicine, and his pediatric training at Children’s Hos- pital, Boston and Seattle Children’s, and he served as a CDC EIS officer. A. David Paltiel, Ph.D., is professor of public health and managerial sciences at the Yale School of Medicine. He also holds an appointment as profes-

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 APPENDIX H sor at the Yale School of Management. His research deals broadly with issues of resource allocation and decision making in health and medicine. An expert in the application of mathematical and economic simulation models to inform public choice and clinical practice, he has conducted model- based cost-effectiveness analyses and policy evaluations on such subjects as expanded screening for HIV, inhaled steroids in adult asthma, treatment options for patients with knee pain and osteoarthritis, and the FDA’s ap- proval of home testing for HIV. He is an officer of the Society for Medical Decision Making and a member of the Scientific Review Committee of the French National Agency for Research on AIDS and Viral Hepatitis. He has previously served on the editorial boards of both Medical Decision Making and Value in Health. Dr. Paltiel received his Ph.D. in operations research from Yale in 1992. Arthur L. Reingold, M.D., is professor of epidemiology and associate dean for research of the University of California at Berkeley (UCB) School of Public Health. He is also professor of epidemiology and biostatistics and clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). His research interests include emerging and reemerging infections and vaccine-preventable diseases in the United States and developing coun- tries. Dr. Reingold currently serves on the World Health Organization’s Stra- tegic Advisory Group of Experts on vaccines and vaccine policy; is director of the California Emerging Infections Program; and is director of the NIH Fogarty AIDS International Training and Research Program at UCB-UCSF. Recent publications include articles on the impact of the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in the United States and related topics. Before joining the faculty at UCB, Dr. Reingold worked for eight years at CDC. He was elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in 2003. David B. Reuben, M.D., is director, Multicampus Program in Geriatrics Medicine and Gerontology (MPGMG), and chief, Division of Geriatrics, at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) Center for Health Sci- ences. He is the Archstone Foundation Chair and Professor at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. He is also director of the UCLA Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Center. Dr. Reuben sustains professional interests in clinical care, education, research, and administra- tive aspects of geriatrics. He maintains a clinical primary care practice of frail older persons and attends on inpatient and geriatric psychiatry units at UCLA. He has won seven awards for excellence in teaching. Dr. Reuben’s current research interests include redesigning the office visit to improve healthcare quality and measurement of how older adults function. In 2000, Dr. Reuben was given the Dennis H. Jahnigen Memorial Award for out- standing contributions to education in the field of geriatrics, and in 2008,

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 PRIORITIES FOR THE NATIONAL VACCINE PLAN he received the Joseph T. Freeman Award from the Gerontological Society of America. Dr. Reuben was part of the team that received the 2008 John M. Eisenberg Patient Safety and Quality Award for Research—Joint Com- mission and National Quality Forum, for Assessing Care of the Vulnerable Elderly (ACOVE). He is a past president of the American Geriatrics Soci- ety and the Association of Directors of Geriatric Academic Programs. Dr. Reuben is currently chair-elect of the Board of Directors of the American Board of Internal Medicine and sits on its Executive Committee. He is lead author of the widely distributed book Geriatrics at Your Fingertips. Dr. Reuben produced Freda Sandrich: Center Stage, a short documentary that was a finalist for a FREDDIE award. His play about decision making at the end of life, Repriees, had its first reading in Los Angeles in 2007 and has had two subsequent commissioned readings, by the California Healthcare Foundation in 2008 and by the Friends of the Semel Institute in 2009. His second play is about Lyndon Johnson and the Civil Rights Act of 1957. Dr. Reuben has served on four past IOM committees. Sara Rosenbaum, J.D., is chair of the Department of Health Policy and Harold and Jane Hirsh Professor of Health Law and Policy at the George Washington University. She also holds an appointment as professor of health care sciences at George Washington’s School of Medicine and Law. As a scholar, an educator, and a national leader, Professor Rosenbaum has dedicated her career to promoting more equitable and effective health care policies in this country, particularly in the areas of Medicaid and Medicare, managed care, employee health benefits, maternal and child health, health services for medically underserved populations, and civil rights in health care systems. Her commitment to strengthening access to care for low-income, minority, and medically underserved populations has had a transforming effect on the lives of many Americans, particularly children. In addition to her responsibilities as chair of the Department of Health Policy, which she founded and developed, Professor Rosenbaum directs the Hirsh Health Law and Policy Program. As a mentor, she is drawn to young people interested in improving health care for the poor. Professor Rosenbaum has been named one of the nation’s 500 most influential health policy makers by McGraw Hill. Among other honors, she has received the Investigator Award in Health Policy from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and has been recognized by the Department of Health and Human Services for distinguished national service on behalf of Medicaid beneficiaries. As a member of the White House Domestic Policy Council under President Clinton, she directed the drafting of the Health Security Act and oversaw the development of the Vaccines for Children Program. Professor Rosenbaum received her B.A. from Wesleyan University and her J.D. from Boston University School of Law.

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 APPENDIX H Milagritos D. Tapia, M.D., is assistant professor of pediatrics and medicine at the University of Maryland. She is interested in the utility of oral fluid as a proxy for serum measurement of antibody responses. She has found that there is an excellent correlation between the serum and oral fluid measure- ments of antibodies against measles, meningococcus, and tetanus. She also spends a great deal of her time working at the Center for Vaccine Develop- ment field site in Bamako, Mali, in West Africa. There, she has been studying the epidemiology of invasive bacterial infections, the incidence of group A streptococcal pharyngitis, and the prevalence of rheumatic heart disease in the pediatric population. She was coinvestigator on several multicenter vac- cine trials including an efficacy trial of rotavirus vaccine in Malian infants and safety and immunogenicity trials of conjugate meningococcal A vaccine in Malian toddlers and adults.

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