Cover Image

PAPERBACK
$85.50



View/Hide Left Panel

the maximum rate at week 27 was 36.6 per 10,000. From the epidemic curve in Figure A13-8, we can observe the different actions taken during the epidemic, the curve of confirmed deaths is superimposed to gauge the effect of the measures. At first, treatment was performed in all cases and prophylaxis in all contacts, as was held in Puerto Madryn in the first case by stopping the chain of transmission. The same was done in the school outbreaks, which is the first peak shown in the curve. Had schools been closed as recommended between June 8th to 19th, the virus probably would not have spread as far and there may have been fewer deaths. An increase in deaths resulted because of the lack of early treatment by shifting to mitigation and only treating cases of severe acute respiratory infection (SARI), as discussed below in the description of the deceased. By recommending treatment for pregnant women, risk groups, and those who are ill, the number of deaths seems to have declined. In addition, school closures and vacations in some jurisdictions appears to have diminished number of cases and deaths.

FIGURE A13-8 Confirmed and under study cases of influenza and pandemic influenza (H1N1) 2009 by date of onset of symptoms (n = 15,455), Argentina, April-September 2009.

FIGURE A13-8 Confirmed and under study cases of influenza and pandemic influenza (H1N1) 2009 by date of onset of symptoms (n = 15,455), Argentina, April-September 2009.

SOURCE: Ministry of Health National Surveillance System.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement