Appendix A
Workshop Agenda

Expanding Biofuel Production: Sustainability and the Transition to Advanced Biofuels


Lessons from the Upper Midwest for Sustainability


Date: June 23-24, 2009


Location: The Lussier Family Heritage Center

3101 Lake Farm Rd., Madison, WI 53711


Workshop Objectives:

  • Create an opportunity for dialogue between researchers and policy makers on the sustainability impacts of expanding biofuel production at a state/regional level.

  • Explore the lessons that can be learned from the experience with corn-based ethanol and the likely impacts of advanced biofuels.

  • Identify biofuel-related policy objectives and challenges facing state officials.

  • Provide examples of research that may be useful to state decision makers.

  • Evaluate various tools and indicators that may be of use to state policy makers in assessing likely sustainability impacts and tradeoffs of policy choices.



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Appendix A Workshop Agenda Expanding Biofuel Production: Sustainability and the Transition to Advanced Biofuels Lessons from the Upper Midwest for Sustainability Date: June 23-24, 2009 Location: The Lussier Family Heritage Center 3101 Lake Farm Rd., Madison, WI 53711 Workshop Objectives: • Create an opportunity for dialogue between researchers and policy mak- ers on the sustainability impacts of expanding biofuel production at a state/regional level. • Explore the lessons that can be learned from the experience with corn- based ethanol and the likely impacts of advanced biofuels. • Identify biofuel-related policy objectives and challenges facing state officials. • Provide examples of research that may be useful to state decision makers. • Evaluate various tools and indicators that may be of use to state policy makers in assessing likely sustainability impacts and tradeoffs of policy choices. 39

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0 APPENDIX A Tuesday, June 3, 009 LUSSIER FAMILY HERITAGE CENTER Introduction 9:00 AM Emmy Simmons, Co-Chair, Roundtable on Science and Technology for Sustainability, The National Academies Welcome Molly Jahn, Dean, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Wisconsin Workshop Overview 9:15 AM Gary Radloff, Wisconsin State Department of Agriculture SETTING THE STAGE U.S. Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA), 9:30 AM Implications for State Biofuels Policies Paul Argyropoulos and Bruce Rodan, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Overview: Regional Biofuels Policies (Wisconsin, 9:45 AM Minnesota, and Iowa) Brendan Jordan, Great Plains Institute Judy Ziewacz, Director, Wisconsin Office of Energy Independence John Yunker, Office of the Legislative Auditor, Minnesota 10:15 AM Discussion 10:30 AM Break A Transition to Advanced Biofuels: Where Are We? 10:45 AM John Miranowski, National Research Council Panel Member, Report: Alternatie Liquid Transportation Fuels John Regalbuto, National Science Foundation, Federal Inter-Agency Biomass R&D Board, Conersion Technologies Assessment Report 11:15 AM Questions and Discussion Sustainability and a Transition to Advanced Biofuels 11:30 AM John Sheehan, University of Minnesota, Institute on the Environment • The Economy—economics of production, economic benefits, effects on other industries. • Affected Environment—water quality and quantity, watersheds, air quality and health, soil erosion/nutrient-

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 APPENDIX A level changes (including cross-media effects), land-use changes, habitat protection (including agroforestry and wood energy crops). • Social Impacts—effects on local communities and institutions of expanding production arrival or disappearance of refineries; acceptability/willingness to adopt new fuels/technologies; changes in labor force, culture, education. 12:00 PM Questions and Discussion 12:30 PM Lunch REGIONAL IMPACTS OF BIOFUEL PRODUCTION AND USE IN THE UPPER MIDWEST The Economics of Expanding Biofuel Production in the 1:30 PM Upper Midwest (Panel Discussion) Panel Moderator: Bruce Babcock, Center for Agricultural and Rural Development, Iowa State University What hae we learned from experience with corn-based ethanol? What is required to make the industry iable going forward? What are likely impacts of expanding the production and deployment of adanced cellulosic biofuel technologies on state economies, employment, agricultural production, and prices for land and agricultural commodities? How will these impacts differ with arious feedstocks? What are the likely impacts on competing users for land and biomass feedstocks (food, feed, fiber, and other bioenergy feedstocks)? • David Swenson, Iowa State University • Randall Fortenbery, University of Wisconsin • Doug Tiffany, University of Minnesota Social and Community-Level Impacts of Biofuel 2:30 PM Production in the Upper Midwest (Panel Discussion) Panel Moderator: Michael Bell, University of Wisconsin-Madison What social impacts hae been obsered and might be seen in the future? How can aderse social impacts be minimized as we moe forward with a transition to adanced biofuels? Who benefits and who stands to lose in arious production scenarios, including transition from corn-based ethanol to cellulosic ethanol? • Carmen Bain, Iowa State University • LeAnn Tigges, University of Wisconsin

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 APPENDIX A • Jim Kleinschmit, Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy (IATP) The Environment and Health (Panel Discussion) 3:30 PM Panel Moderator: Phil Robertson, GLBRC and Michigan State University What hae been the enironmental impacts of expanded corn ethanol production in the Upper Midwest, and what are the likely impacts of expanding production of both cellulosic biofuels and corn-based ethanol? What does this mean for enironmental sustainability in this region, and what are appropriate metrics and indicators? Discussion to include land-use changes. • Chris Kucharik, University of Wisconsin • Donna Perla, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency • Peter Nowak, University of Wisconsin Breakout Discussions: Lessons Learned and a Transition 4:30 PM Forward Each breakout group of participants will be asked to answer the set of questions below based on their expertise and information presented during the workshop’s earlier sessions. • Identify a comprehensive set of potential impacts associated with a transition to advanced biofuels: • List potential environmental impacts (both positive and negative) • List potential economic impacts (both positive and negative) • List potential social/cultural impacts (both positive and negative) • What are the potential strategies for mitigating potential negative consequences/negative impacts of a transition to advanced biofuels? • What are the greatest uncertainties as we move forward with advanced biofuels (e.g., winning feedstocks)? Breakout Groups Report Back 5:15 PM 5:30 PM Adjourn 6:00-7:30 PM Reception, Hosted by the Wisconsin Bioenergy Initiative, Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies, and the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, Brocach Irish Pub, 7 W. Main Street, Second floor, Madison, WI

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3 APPENDIX A Wednesday, June , 009 LUSSIER FAMILY HERITAGE CENTER The Business of Biofuels: Perspectives from the 9:00 AM Investment Community and Industry (Panel Discussion) Moderator, Pat Atkins, Pegasus Capital Advisors • Ruth Scotti, BP Biofuels, North America • Paul Batcheller, PrairieGold Venture Partners • Bruce Babcock, Iowa State University 10: 00 AM Questions and Discussion 10:30 AM Break Research for Decision Makers (Panel Discussion) 10:45 AM Moderator: Elisabeth Graffy, U.S. Geological Survey What are some examples of federal research releant to sustainability in the Upper Midwest? Additional examples of releant research related to sustainability and biofuels in the region? • Jeffery Steiner, U.S. Department of Agriculture • Alison Goss Eng, U.S. Department of Energy, Biomass Program • Alisa Gallant U.S. Geological Survey • Theresa Selfa, Kansas State University 11:45 AM Questions and Discussion 12:00 PM Lunch Tools to Inform Policy Choices (Panel Discussion) 1:00 PM Moderator: Jason Hill, University of Minnesota What tools are aailable to inform policy choices? What are the strengths and weaknesses of existing tools? • Marilyn Buford, U.S. Forest Service • Alan Hecht, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency • Greg Nemet, University of Wisconsin • Nathanael Greene, NRDC Breakout Session: State Policy Objectives and Research 2:00 PM Needs: Going Forward Each breakout group of participants will be asked to answer the set of questions below based on their expertise and information presented during the workshop’s earlier sessions. • Is there a need for new state/federal policies? • What is the most pressing type of additional research needed by state decision makers?

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 APPENDIX A • Are there examples of policy inconsistencies that create inefficiencies and hinder the adoption of more sustainable production techniques and use of biofuels? • How can scientific research be better used to inform the adoption of sustainable production practices during the transition to advanced biofuels? Breakout Groups Report Back 3:00 PM 3:30 PM Break Breakout Session: Policy Evaluation of Tradeoffs, 3:45 PM Benefits, and Challenges: Going Forward Each breakout group of participants will be asked to answer the set of questions below based on their expertise and information presented during the workshop’s earlier sessions. • What are greatest risks and vulnerabilities associated with expanded production and use? • What will be necessary (beyond technology development) to commercialize production and use of advanced biofuels? • What are greatest challenges (e.g., getting farmers to plant new crops, reducing risks to investors)? Breakout Groups Report Back 4:45 PM Wrap Up: Summary of Workshop Discussions 5:15 PM Moderator: Gary Radloff, Wisconsin State Department of Agriculture 5:30 PM Adjourn