Appendix H
Biographic Sketches of Committee Members, Consultant, and Staff

George J. Isham, MD, MS (Chair), is chief health officer and plan medical director of HealthPartners, the largest consumer-governed, nonprofit health-care organization in the nation. He is past cochair and current member of the National Committee for Quality Assurance Committee on Performance Measurement, which oversees quality-measurement standards. Dr. Isham is also a member of the National Priority Partners effort convened by the National Quality Forum and chairs the population-health work group of the effort. Before his present position, he was medical director of MedCenters Health Plan in Minneapolis and was executive director of University Health Care, an organization affiliated with the University of Wisconsin–Madison. His practice experience includes service as a medical officer in the US Navy. He was chair of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) committee that produced the report Priority Areas for National Action: Transforming Health Care Quality and a member of the Subcommittee on Performance Measurement of IOM’s Committee on Redesigning Health Insurance Performance Measures, Payment, and Performance Improvement Programs. He is currently chair of IOM’s Roundtable on Health Literacy. Dr. Isham received his medical degree from the University of Illinois and served his internship and residency in internal medicine at the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics in Madison. He also holds an MS in preventive medicine and administrative medicine from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Dr. Isham is a National Associate of the Institute of Medicine.



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Appendix H Biographic Sketches of Committee Members, Consultant, and Staff george J. Isham, MD, MS (Chair), is chief health officer and plan medi- cal director of HealthPartners, the largest consumer-governed, nonprofit health-care organization in the nation. He is past cochair and current member of the National Committee for Quality Assurance Committee on Performance Measurement, which oversees quality-measurement stan- dards. Dr. Isham is also a member of the National Priority Partners effort convened by the National Quality Forum and chairs the population-health work group of the effort. Before his present position, he was medical direc- tor of MedCenters Health Plan in Minneapolis and was executive director of University Health Care, an organization affiliated with the University of Wisconsin–Madison. His practice experience includes service as a medical officer in the US Navy. He was chair of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) committee that produced the report Priority Areas for national Action: Transforming Health Care Quality and a member of the Subcommittee on Performance Measurement of IOM’s Committee on Redesigning Health Insurance Performance Measures, Payment, and Performance Improve- ment Programs. He is currently chair of IOM’s Roundtable on Health Literacy. Dr. Isham received his medical degree from the University of Illinois and served his internship and residency in internal medicine at the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics in Madison. He also holds an MS in preventive medicine and administrative medicine from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Dr. Isham is a National Associate of the Institute of Medicine. 

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 MEnTAL HEALTH CoUnSELInG SERVICES UnDER TRICARE Kathryn Karusaitis Basham, PhD, LICSW, is professor in the Smith College School for Social Work, Co-Director of the doctoral program, and editor of Smith College Studies in Social Work. Her fields of research, publication, and teaching interest include clinical practice models with survivors of childhood trauma and combat trauma, couple- and family- therapy practice after deployment, cross-cultural practice, pedagogy, diversity and antiracism practice, ethics, and professional identity devel- opment. Recent publications and teaching consultations have focused on couple- and family-therapy approaches with service members and their families at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center (Washington, DC) and several Veterans Administration Medical Centers throughout the country and with military and civilian clinicians working with Canadian Forces. Dr. Basham has previously served as a committee member in Institute of Medicine studies that resulted in the reports Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Diagnosis and Assessment (2006) and Gulf War and Health, Volume : Physiologic, Psychologic, and Psychosocial Effects of Deployment-Related Stress (2008). She was coauthor of a text titled Transforming the Legacy: Couple Therapy with Survivors of Child- hood Trauma (2004). Dr. Basham maintains a private practice in clinical social work, specializing in couple, family, and individual psychotherapy and consultation services. In collaboration with a colleague at Smith College, she is engaged in a pilot research project that explores the effectiveness of a couple-therapy practice model for traumatized couples in which one partner is a veteran of Operation Iraqi Freedom and had a diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder. In 2007, she was inducted into the National Academies of Practice as a distinguished practitioner and has worked actively on issues pertaining to graduate-level education for social workers and licensure. Dr. Basham earned her MSW from the University of California, Berkeley, and her PhD from Smith College. Alisa B. Busch, MD, MS, is assistant professor of psychiatry and of health-care policy at Harvard Medical School. She is also director of inte- gration of clinical measurement and health services research at McLean Hospital. Dr. Busch has over 10 years of experience in treating patients who have psychiatric illness, most recently as attending psychiatrist at McLean’s Alcohol and Drug Abuse Partial Hospital Program. Dr. Busch’s primary research interests are in measuring the quality of mental health care and understanding how systemwide policy and financing arrange- ments affect the quality of mental health treatment. She has examined

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 APPEnDIx H quality of care in the public and private sectors for psychiatric illnesses, including depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and co-occurring substance-use disorders. In 2004, she was awarded the McLean Hospital Alfred Pope Award for Young Investigators for her research on the effect of a Medicaid managed behavioral health carveout on quality of care for schizophrenia. Dr. Busch is a current recipient of a Career Develop- ment Award from the National Institute of Mental Health to conduct research on quality of care for bipolar disorder. She is also a network member in the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Mandated Community Treatment. Dr. Busch received a BA in English from New York University, her MD from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and her MS in health policy and management from the Harvard School of Public Health. N. Emmanuel (Manoli) g. Cassimatis, MD, is president and chief executive officer of the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) and chair of the Foundation for Advancement of International Medical Education and Research, ECFMG’s nonprofit foundation. He was formerly vice president for affiliations and interna- tional affairs at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS), associate dean for clinical affairs and professor of psychiatry at the University’s F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine. He served in the US Army for 26 years and retired with the rank of colonel. Earlier in his career, he practiced at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center, serving as assistant chief of the Inpatient Psychiatry Service, director of Psychiatric Education and Training, and chief of the Outpatient Psychiatry Service. Later assignments included a tour as deputy com- mander for clinical services at the Army’s Frankfurt Regional Medical Center and positions in the Office of the Army Surgeon General as psychiatry consultant; chief of the Graduate Medical Education Branch, and Chief of the Medical Education Division. Dr. Cassimatis served on the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Institutional Review Committee from 2001 through 2004 and on the ACGME Board of Directors from 1999 to 2006, the last 2 years as chair. From 1995 through 1997, he was a delegate to the American Medical Association (AMA) House of Delegates from the Association of Military Surgeons of the United States (AMSUS) and served as a member and chair of the AMA Council on Medical Education, the AMA Specialty and Service Society Governing Council, the AMA Section Council on

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0 MEnTAL HEALTH CoUnSELInG SERVICES UnDER TRICARE Federal and Military Medicine, and the American Board of Medical Specialties–AMA Liaison Committee on Specialty Boards. In addition to his duties at USUHS, Dr. Cassimatis serves on the Executive Com- mittee of the National Disaster Life Support Education Consortium and as president of the Hellenic American Psychiatric Association. Dr. Cassimatis received his BA from the University of Chicago, his MD from Harvard Medical School, and his psychoanalytic training at the Washington Psychoanalytic Institute. He is a Life Fellow of AMSUS, a member of the Academy of Medicine of Washington, DC, a fellow of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis and Dynamic Psychiatry, and a Distinguished Life Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association. John H. Moxley III, MD, is an independent consultant and is the retired managing director of the North American Health Care Division of Korn/Ferry International. His expertise includes training, costs, and manpower issues; federal-agency administration; and military medical issues. He has held a number of senior positions in academe, govern- ment, and industry, including being dean of the medical schools of the University of Maryland and the University of California, San Diego; Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs; and senior vice presi- dent of the hospital management firm American Medical International. Dr. Moxley has served on numerous scientific boards and advisory committees, including the American Hospital Association Board of Trustees; the Scientific Board of the California Medical Association, as chairman; the Council on Scientific Affairs of the American Medical Association; the National Fund for Medical Education; and the Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine. He was chair of the National Research Council Committee on Strategies to Protect the Health of Deployed US Forces and served on the Research Council’s Board on Army Science and Technology and Naval Studies Board. Dr. Moxley earned his MD from the University of Colorado; he is board-certified in internal medicine and is a fellow of the American College of Physicians. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine. Harold A. Pincus, MD, is professor and vice chair of the Department of Psychiatry and associate director of the Irving Institute for Clinical and Translational Research at Columbia University. He is also director of quality and outcomes research at New York–Presbyterian Hospital and serves as a senior scientist at the RAND Corporation. Dr. Pincus

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 APPEnDIx H is the director of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Depression in Primary Care: Linking Clinical and Systems Strategies program. He previously served as deputy medical director of the American Psychiatric Association and was the founding director of its Office of Research, executive director of the American Psychiatric Institute for Research and Education, cochair of the work group to update the text of the Diag- nostic and Statistical Manual, Fourth Edition, and special assistant to the director of the National Institute of Mental Health. He has published widely in health-services research, science policy, and the diagnosis and classification of and treatment for mental disorders, and he has been appointed to the editorial boards of 10 major scientific journals. Dr. Pincus is the principal investigator of the congressionally mandated Program Evaluation of Mental Health Services in the Veterans Health Administration of the Department of Veterans Affairs. He graduated from the University of Pennsylvania and received his MD from Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York. Dr. Pincus maintains a small private practice specializing in major affective disorders and has spent one evening a week for 22 years at a public mental health clinic caring for patients who have severe mental illness. Theodore P. Remley, Jr., JD, PhD, LPC, is professor and Batten Endowed Chair in the Counseling Graduate Program at Old Dominion University in Virginia, where he is chair of the Department of Counsel- ing and Human Services. Before joining the faculty at Old Dominion University, Dr. Remley led counseling doctoral programs at the Univer- sity of New Orleans and Mississippi State University and was executive director of the American Counseling Association (ACA) from 1990 to 1994. He has served as a school counselor and a college counselor and has had a private practice in both counseling and law. He has expertise in licensure, certification, private practice, and employment and public recognition of counselors, and he is the first author of the counselor- education text Ethical, Legal, and Professional Issues in Counseling. Dr. Remley holds a doctorate in counselor education from the Univer- sity of Florida and a law degree from Catholic University in Washington, DC. He served in the US Army Reserve and the Virginia Army National Guard, earning the rank of captain. He is a licensed professional coun- selor in Virginia, Louisiana, and Mississippi and is a member of the bar in Virginia and Florida. A nationally certified counselor, he has chaired the counselor-licensure boards in Virginia and Mississippi and served as

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 MEnTAL HEALTH CoUnSELInG SERVICES UnDER TRICARE a member of the Louisiana and District of Columbia boards. Dr. Rem- ley was named an ACA fellow in 2008 for his service and scholarship contributions to the counseling profession, one of the highest awards given by ACA. Phyllis W. Sharps, PhD, RN, CNE, FAAN, is professor and chair of the Department of Community Public Health at the Johns Hopkins Uni- versity School of Nursing and the director of three health and wellness centers operated by the school. Dr. Sharps conducts community-based participatory research and has a current study funded by the National Institutes of Health to examine community-health nurse interventions for abused pregnant women aimed at reducing violent victimization and improving maternal physical, mental, and other health outcomes. The overarching focus of her work is on the effects of intimate-partner vio- lence on the physical and emotional health of pregnant women, infants, and very young children. Research activities have included investigations of mental health, depression, and other factors that affect the health of military pregnant women. Dr. Sharps applies her clinical research find- ings to improving women’s health through her activities as a member of the Advisory Board for the International Association of Chiefs of Police and as a trainer and consultant for the Family Violence Prevention Fund and National Institute of Justice. She is consulted frequently about cul- tural competence in research with African American women and com- munities. She earned her PhD from the University of Maryland School of Nursing. Dr. Sharps served in the US Army (active duty and Reserves in the Nurse Corps) for 30 years, retiring with the rank of colonel. Roy A. Swift, PhD, FAOTA, is senior director of personnel credentialing accreditation programs for the American National Standards Institute. Before his current position, he was a consultant to educational, certifica- tion, licensure, and health-care organizations. From 1993 to 1998, he was executive director of the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy. That appointment followed a career in the US Army Medical Department. In his last position, he was chief of the Army Medical Spe- cialist Corps with policy responsibility for Army occupational therapists, physical therapists, dietitians, and physician assistants throughout the world. Dr. Swift serves on the Board of Directors of CGFNS International and as a member of the Board of Directors Standing Hearing Panel of the American Psychological Association. He has served on the Board of Direc-

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 APPEnDIx H tors of the Council on Licensure, Enforcement and Regulation and the National Organization for Competency Assurance. He has also served on national committees with the American Occupational Therapy Associa- tion, including being chair of the accreditation committee for academic programs, and chaired the Assembly of Review Committee Chairmen of the former Council on Allied Health Education and Accreditation of the American Medical Association. From July 2003 to October 2006, Dr. Swift served on the Secretary of Veterans Affairs’ Professional Certification and Licensure Advisory Committee. He received a BS in occupational therapy from the University of Kansas, an MS from the University of Southern California, and a PhD in continuing and vocational education from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. He served in the US Army for 28 years, retiring with the rank of colonel. vilia M. Tarvydas, PhD, CRC, LMHC, is professor and clinical coordi- nator for the Graduate Programs in Rehabilitation in the Department of Counseling, Rehabilitation, and Student Development of the University of Iowa College of Education. Dr. Tarvydas is a certified rehabilitation counselor and a licensed mental health counselor with more than 33 years of experience as a rehabilitation counselor educator and practicing rehabilitation professional. Her scholarly works and professional presen- tations have concentrated on ethics and ethical decision making, profes- sional standards, and rehabilitation after traumatic brain injury. The third edition of her textbook, Counseling Ethics and Decision Making, was pub- lished in 2007. In 2008, she received two prominent awards for her career contributions: the James F. Garrett Distinguished Career Research Award from the American Rehabilitation Counseling Association (ARCA) and the Distinguished Career in Rehabilitation Education Award from the National Council on Rehabilitation Education (NCRE). She has been prominent in leadership of the major professional organizations in coun- seling and rehabilitation counseling, serving on the Board of Directors of the National Rehabilitation Counseling Association, as vice chair of the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification, and as president of ARCA and NCRE. She is president of the American Association of State Counseling Boards and immediate past chair of the Iowa Board of Behavior Examiners and chair of its Disciplinary Committee. She has served as a member of the American Counseling Association’s Ethics Committee and the Judicial Council of the American Occupational Therapy Association. Recently, Dr. Tarvydas developed the Institute on

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 MEnTAL HEALTH CoUnSELInG SERVICES UnDER TRICARE Disability and Rehabilitation Ethics in the University of Iowa College of Education. Dr. Tarvydas received her MA in educational rehabilitation counseling and her PhD in rehabilitation psychology from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Consultant to the Committee Rhonda J. Robinson Beale, MD, is the chief medical officer for OptumHealth Behavioral Solutions, a health-maintenance organization. Earlier, she served as the chief medical officer for PacifiCare Behavioral Health, senior vice president and chief medical officer for CIGNA Behavioral Health, national medical director for Blue Cross Blue Shield, executive medical director of medical and care management clinical programs for Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan, and senior medical director for behavioral medicine for Health Alliance Plan. Dr. Robinson Beale has over 20 years of behavioral health and quality-management experience. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Board on Health Care Services and has served on the IOM Board on Neurosci- ence and Behavioral Health. As a member of several IOM committees, Dr. Robinson Beale has contributed to important national studies, including Crossing the Quality Chasm and Managing Managed Care: Quality Improvement in Behavioral Health. In addition, she has served on the National Quality Forum Board of Directors as cochair of the Steer- ing Committee for Evidence-Based Practices to Treat Substance Use Dis- orders project. She serves on the Board of Directors of the Association for Behavioral Health and Wellness. Dr. Robinson Beale received her medical degree from the Wayne State University School of Medicine and her psychiatric training at the Detroit Psychiatric Institute. She is certi- fied in psychiatry by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. Dr. Robinson Beale is a National Associate of IOM. Institute of Medicine Staff and Other Contributors David A. Butler, PhD, is senior program officer in the Institute of Med- icine (IOM) Board on the Health of Select Populations. He received his BS and MS in engineering from the University of Rochester and his PhD in public-policy analysis from Carnegie Mellon University. Before joining IOM, Dr. Butler served as an analyst for the US Congress Office of Technology Assessment and was Research Associate in the Depart-

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 APPEnDIx H ment of Environmental Health of the Harvard School of Public Health. He has directed several IOM studies on military-health topics, including ones that produced PTSD Compensation and Military Service, Veterans and Agent orange: Update  and Update 000, Disposition of the Air Force Health Study, and the series Characterizing the Exposure of Veterans to Agent orange and other Herbicides Used in Vietnam: Scientific Con- siderations Regarding a Request for Proposals for Research. Dr. Butler was also a coeditor of Systems Engineering to Improve Traumatic Brain Injury Care in the Military Health System: Workshop Summary. Jessica L. Buono, MPH, is a fellow at Merck & Co., Inc., conduct- ing pharmacoeconomics and outcomes research. Earlier, she worked as research associate with the Board on the Health of Select Populations of the Institute of Medicine. She has also held positions as a research associ- ate in the Policy and Global Affairs division of the National Academies and as a Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Fellow for the National Academy of Engineering Program Office and the Com- mittee on Women in Science, Engineering, and Medicine. Ms. Buono received her BS in behavioral neuroscience from Lehigh University and her MPH in epidemiology from the George Washington University. Sarah gaillot, MPhil, was a Christine Mirzayan Science and Technol- ogy Policy Fellow for the Institute of Medicine Board on the Health of Select Populations. She is completing a PhD in policy analysis at the Pardee RAND Graduate School (PRGS), where her research focuses on disparities in the use of trauma and mental health service. She also serves as an assistant policy analyst at RAND, focusing on military health policy. Before joining PRGS and RAND, Ms. Gaillot taught English in South Korea on a Fulbright teaching grant. She received a BS in human development–family studies and psychology from Pennsylvania State University and spent semesters at the University of Ghana and the National University of Singapore. Andrew Bradley, BS, graduated from the University of Virginia (UVa), where he majored in biomedical engineering, in 2008. Through the UVa School of Engineering’s Policy Internship Program, he interned in 2007 at the Institute of Medicine for the Board on Military and Veterans Health. He is a pursuing his medical studies at the University of Michigan.

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 MEnTAL HEALTH CoUnSELInG SERVICES UnDER TRICARE Frederick (Rick) Erdtmann, MD, MPH, is director of the Board on the Health of Select Populations and of the Medical Follow-up Agency of the Institute of Medicine. He earned his MD from Temple Univer- sity School of Medicine, and he holds an MPH from the University of California, Berkeley. He completed a residency program in general preventive medicine at Walter Reed Army Institute of Research in 1975 and is board certified in that specialty. Dr. Erdtmann’s assignments with the Army Medical Department included being chief of preventive- medicine services at Fitzsimons Army Medical Center, at Frankfurt Army Medical Center in Germany, and at Madigan Army Medical Center. He also served as division surgeon for the Second Infantry Divi- sion in Tongduchon, Korea. He later served as Deputy Chief of Staff for Clinical Operations in the Department of Defense’s TRICARE Region 1 before assuming hospital command at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in March 1998. After that, he was assigned to the Office of the Surgeon General as the Deputy Assistant Surgeon General for Force Development. In 2001, after 30 years of commissioned military service, Dr. Erdtmann joined the National Academies and assumed his present responsibilities. Pamela Ramey-McCray, BA, joined the National Academies in 1993 as a senior project assistant for the Medical Follow-up Agency and has been the administrative assistant for the Institute of Medicine Board on the Health of Selection Populations since 1996. Ms. Ramey-McCray graduated from Trinity College, where she majored in human relations, in 2004. She is a member of Psi Chi, the International Honor Society in Psychology.