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Committee Member Biographical Sketches

JANE E. HENNEY, M.D. (Chair), is professor of medicine at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. Previously, she was senior vice president and provost of Health Affairs at the University of Cincinnati. Her experience and expertise lie in managing complex organizations that provide direct health services, regulate science-based products, educate the next generation of health professionals, and conduct biomedical research. She has served in a series of senior health policy leadership positions including commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (1999–2001); deputy director of the National Cancer Institute; vice chancellor, Health Programs, of Kansas Medical Center; interim dean of the University of Kansas School of Medicine; and vice president for Health Sciences at the University of New Mexico. Dr. Henney currently serves on several not-for-profit boards including the Commonwealth Foundation, the China Medical Board, and her alma mater, Manchester College. She is also a member of the board of three for-profit companies: AmerisourceBergen Corp., AstraZeneca Ltd., and Cigna Corp. She served on several Institute of Medicine (IOM) committees including the Planning Committee for The IOM Drug Safety Report: Resource Implications (A Workshop), the Committee on Improving Mammography Quality Standards, and the IOM Membership Committee, and she is currently serving as IOM Membership Section 12 chair. Dr. Henney received her undergraduate degree from Manchester College and her medical degree from Indiana University; she completed her subspecialty training in medical oncology at the M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute and the National Cancer Institute. She is an IOM member.



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Committee Member Biographical Sketches JANE E. HENNEY, M.D. (Chair), is professor of medicine at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. Previously, she was senior vice president and provost of Health Affairs at the University of Cincinnati. Her experi- ence and expertise lie in managing complex organizations that provide direct health services, regulate science-based products, educate the next gen- eration of health professionals, and conduct biomedical research. She has served in a series of senior health policy leadership positions including com- missioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (1999–2001); deputy director of the National Cancer Institute; vice chancellor, Health Programs, of Kansas Medical Center; interim dean of the University of Kansas School of Medicine; and vice president for Health Sciences at the University of New Mexico. Dr. Henney currently serves on several not-for-profit boards including the Commonwealth Foundation, the China Medical Board, and her alma mater, Manchester College. She is also a member of the board of three for-profit companies: AmerisourceBergen Corp., AstraZeneca Ltd., and Cigna Corp. She served on several Institute of Medicine (IOM) commit- tees including the Planning Committee for The IOM Drug Safety Report: Resource Implications (A Workshop), the Committee on Improving Mam- mography Quality Standards, and the IOM Membership Committee, and she is currently serving as IOM Membership Section 12 chair. Dr. Henney received her undergraduate degree from Manchester College and her medi- cal degree from Indiana University; she completed her subspecialty training in medical oncology at the M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute and the National Cancer Institute. She is an IOM member. 

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 STRATEGIES TO REDUCE SODIUM INTAKE CHERYL A. M. ANDERSON, Ph.D., M.P.H., is assistant professor of epidemiology at The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, Maryland. Dr. Anderson’s research centers on diet and the pre- vention of chronic diseases in minority and underserved populations. Her current research projects address the effects of sodium and potassium intake on clinical and subclinical cardiovascular disease, diet and the prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the context of chronic kidney disease, and the optimal macronutrient intake in CVD prevention. Dr. Anderson is a member of the American Heart Association Committee on Nutrition and Physical Activity. She is also a Dannon Institute Nutrition Leadership Institute (NLI) scholar and past president of the NLI Alumni Association. She has served on the National Institutes of Health (NIH) National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Writing Group on Primary Preven- tion of Stroke. Dr. Anderson recently completed committee service on the IOM-NAS (National Academy of Sciences) Committee on Use of Dietary Supplements by Military Personnel (2006–2008). Prior to her appoint- ment at Johns Hopkins, Dr. Anderson was an instructor of epidemiology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics. She has a B.A. from Brown University, an M.P.H. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, an M.S. in epidemiology, and a Ph.D. in nutritional sciences from the University of Washington School of Public Health and Community Medicine. SONIA Y. ANGELL, M.D., M.P.H., is director of the Cardiovascular Dis- ease Prevention and Control Program at the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. She is responsible for overseeing the develop- ment of citywide and targeted initiatives and policies designed to prevent cardiovascular morbidity and mortality among New York City residents and to eliminate related health disparities. One such activity includes the regulation of trans fat in city restaurants; a new focus for her agency in- cludes the reduction of population sodium intake. Dr. Angell received her M.D. from the University of California at San Francisco and completed a primary care internal medicine residency at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. She is an Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University and Assistant Attend- ing Physician at New York Presbyterian Hospital. Dr. Angell has a diploma in tropical medicine and hygiene from the London School and an M.P.H. from the University of Michigan. She is a former Robert Wood Johnson clinical scholar. LAWRENCE J. APPEL, M.D., M.P.H., is professor of medicine in the Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology and Clinical Research at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. Con-

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 COMMITTEE MEMBER BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES currently, he holds adjunct appointments in epidemiology and international health (human nutrition) at The Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. The focus of Dr. Appel’s career has been the conduct of clinical research pertaining to the prevention of hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and renal disease, through both pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic approaches, typically nutrition-based. He has served as an investigator in a number of hypertension clinical trials, including Trials of Hypertension Prevention, Trials of Non-pharmacologic Interventions in the Elderly, PREMIER, DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension), DASH-Sodium, and the African-American Study of Kidney Disease and Hy- pertension. Dr. Appel previously served as chair of the IOM-NAS Commit- tee on Dietary Reference Intakes for Electrolytes and Water (2002–2004) as well as a member of the Committee on Examination of the Evolving Science for Dietary Supplements (2001–2002) and the Committee on Nutrition Ser- vices for Medicare Beneficiaries (1999–2000). He received his M.D. from the New York University School of Medicine and his M.P.H. from Johns Hopkins University. GARY K. BEAUCHAMP, Ph.D., is director and president of the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia. Monell was established in 1968 as the world’s first scientific institute for multidisciplinary research on taste, smell, and chemosensory irritation, based at the University of Pennsylva- nia. The two institutions continue to maintain a close relationship. Dr. Beauchamp is an adjunct professor in the Department of Psychology and in the School of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. He has served as Monell’s director since 1990. His research relates to genetics of taste perception; development of human chemosensory perception and preference; genetics and behavior of individual olfactory identity; and adult human taste perception with a special interest in salt taste. Dr. Beauchamp has published more than 250 publications in peer-reviewed journals. He is a director of the Ambrose Monell Foundation and the G. Ungar Vetlesen Foundation. He has served on many NIH committees and served as a mem- ber of the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Dis- orders (NIDCD) Advisory Council of the NIH (2001–2005). He received his B.A. from Carleton College and his Ph.D. in biopsychology from the Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago. RONETTE R. BRIEFEL, Dr.P.H., R.D., is a senior fellow at Mathematica Policy Research in Washington, DC. Her expertise includes nutrition moni- toring, dietary intake assessment, and the evaluation of nutrition programs and policies to promote health and prevent disease. She was senior research epidemiologist and nutrition policy adviser at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics. Through

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0 STRATEGIES TO REDUCE SODIUM INTAKE her work, Dr. Briefel has analyzed national data on food consumption and health including sodium intakes, obesity, and hypertension in the popula- tion and authored more than 100 publications in peer-reviewed journals. Her current research at Mathematica focuses on the dietary intakes of infants and preschoolers, and the relationship between the school food environment and children’s diets and obesity. Dr. Briefel’s IOM-NAS com- mittee service includes the Panel on Enhancing the Data Infrastructure in Support of Food and Nutrition Programs, Research, and Decision-Making (2004–2005), Committee on the Scientific Basis for Dietary Risk Eligibility Criteria for WIC Programs (2000–2002), and Committee on Food Addi- tives Survey Data (1988–1990). Dr. Briefel received her B.S. in nutrition from Pennsylvania State University, and her M.P.H. in maternal and child health and Dr.P.H. in chronic disease epidemiology from the University of Pittsburgh. MARSHA N. COHEN, J.D., is a professor of law at the University of Cali- fornia Hastings College of the Law in San Francisco, where she has also served twice as acting associate dean of admissions. Her primary teaching assignments have been food and drug law, torts, and administrative law, and for many years she supervised the college’s large judicial externship program. Professor Cohen began to specialize in food and drug law as a staff attorney with the Washington Office of Consumers Union. Thereafter she served for two terms as a member of the California State Board of Phar- macy and was its first non-pharmacist president. She is the author (with the late William L. Marcus) of Pharmacy Law for California Pharmacists, now in its sixth edition. Professor Cohen has served on three National Research Council and Institute of Medicine committees: the Committee on Review of the Use of Scientific Criteria and Performance Standards for Safe Food (2002–2003), the Committee on Ensuring Safe Food from Produc- tion to Consumption (1998), and the Committee on State Food Labeling (1991–1992). She has also served on the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) Food Advisory and Device Good Manufacturing Practices Advi- sory Committees, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Council, and the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW) Review Panel on New Drug Regulation. Professor Cohen is coauthor, with Professor Michael Asimow, of California Administratie Law (2002) and has written numerous law review articles and opinion pieces, most on issues pertaining to food and drugs. She earned her bachelor’s degree from Smith College and her law degree from Harvard Law School. CHRISTINA A. MIRELES DEWITT, Ph.D., is associate professor of food chemistry at Oklahoma State University. Her experience is broad-based in the area of food science, focusing on investigations into alternative pro-

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 COMMITTEE MEMBER BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES cesses that alter protein functionality in fresh and processed meat. Results from these studies suggest possible replacements for sodium-based salts in terms of their traditional role as a solubilizer for protein-based foods. Her earlier work focused on alternative processing methods to alter protein functionality and the chemistry related to replacing phosphate with solubi- lized proteins, as well as the application of alkaline enhancement solution on meat products. She has recently taken on research targeted to the task of reducing salt in foods through the use of protein-based flavor enhancers and functional proteins. Previous experience as food chemistry operations manager at Silliker Laboratories provided her extensive experience on the issues regarding nutrition labeling and the analysis of foods. Dr. DeWitt has a B.S. in food science from Texas A&M University and a Ph.D. in food science from Oregon State University. GREG DRESCHER is executive director of Strategic Initiatives at the Culinary Institute of America (CIA). The only non-scientist in the group of seven experts who authored the keystone paper published in the peer- reviewed American Journal of Clinical Nutrition that set out the principles of the traditional, healthful Mediterranean diet, Mr. Drescher has spent much of his career studying and investigating healthful “flavor strategies” of food cultures around the world and how they can be used to promote more healthful American diets. He is the creator of the CIA’s influential conferences and leadership retreats, including the annual Worlds of Flavor International Conference and Festival (now in its 13th year), the Flavor Summit, and Worlds of Healthy Flavors, a partnership between the CIA and Harvard School of Public Health that for many years has brought together America’s leading nutrition researchers, corporate chefs of volume food- service operations, and world cuisines experts to foster innovation around more healthful menu choices. Mr. Drescher has been honored with a Food Arts Silver Spoon Award and three James Beard awards, in large part for his leadership in researching and documenting the gold standards of cuisines from Europe and Asia to Latin America and making these flavors more ac- cessible to American chefs. He studied western philosophy at the University of the Pacific in Stockton, California. MARY K. MUTH, Ph.D., is director of the Food and Agricultural Policy Research Program at RTI International in North Carolina. She is also an adjunct associate professor in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics at North Carolina State University. Her expertise lies in eco- nomic impact analysis as well as applications of industrial organization, applied welfare analysis, and econometrics in evaluating food and agricul- tural policy and providing information for policy development. Dr. Muth also specializes in developing computer models and databases to support

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 STRATEGIES TO REDUCE SODIUM INTAKE economic impact analyses of regulations, developing industry survey instru- ments, and analyzing industry survey data. Dr. Muth earned her B.S. degree in agricultural and managerial economics from the University of California at Davis, her M.S. in agricultural economics from Cornell University, and her Ph.D. in economics from North Carolina State University. ROBERT J. RUBIN, M.D., F.A.C.P., is currently clinical professor of medi- cine in the Division of Nephrology and Hypertension at the Georgetown University School of Medicine and an independent health-care consultant. Previously, Dr. Rubin was president of the Lewin Group, an international health-care consultancy, for 17 years. During that time, Dr. Rubin served as medical director for a pharmaceutical benefit management company, as well as chair of the board of a biotech start-up. From 1981 to 1984, Dr. Rubin was the assistant secretary for planning and evaluation at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), as well as assistant surgeon general. In the former capacity he was chair of the task forces charged with the design, passage, and implementation of Medicare’s Pro- spective Payment System as well as the primary policy adviser to the HHS Secretary. Currently, as a health-care consultant, he works extensively with pharmaceutical, medical device, and biotech companies to develop strategic and marketing plans for new devices and drugs. He also works with physi- cian groups and providers of nephrologic services. In addition, he advises several government agencies on health-care policy. Dr. Rubin has served on the Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy Fellowships Board (1988–2002), the IOM-NAS Committee to Develop a National Research Agenda on Ag- ing (1988–1991), and the Committee to Study the Future of Public Health (1987–1988). Dr. Rubin received his M.D. from Cornell University Medical College and his undergraduate degree from Williams College. JOHN RUFF, M.A., retired in 2008 as senior vice president, Global Quality, Scientific Affairs and Nutrition, for Kraft Foods in the United States. Prior to joining Kraft, Mr. Ruff was a technical brand manager for Procter & Gamble in England. During his 36-year career with Kraft and the former General Foods, Mr. Ruff worked in six countries and gained experience in product and process development for beverages, coffee, confectionery, desserts, and meals. He has led major basic research programs in sugar and salt substitutes, food safety initiatives, and “greenfield” site startups. Mr. Ruff headed research and development groups for both Kraft Inter- national and North American businesses where he successfully integrated the technical operations of numerous acquisitions and established global centers of expertise to maximize research and development effectiveness. In his most recent role, he established and led a worldwide advisory council consisting of external experts who have helped guide Kraft’s health and

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 COMMITTEE MEMBER BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES wellness initiatives. Mr. Ruff is just completing his term as president of the International Life Sciences Institute and sits on the boards of the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) and the Joffrey Ballet. He is past chair of the Food Processors Association, past chair of the IFT Foundation, and a fellow of the Institute of Food Science and Technology in the United Kingdom. Mr. Ruff received his M.A. in biochemistry and B.A. in natural science from Cambridge University in the United Kingdom. GLORIAN SORENSON, Ph.D., M.P.H., is professor in the Department of Society, Human Development, and Health at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston and director of the Center for Community-Based Research at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. She also directs the Dana- Farber’s Office for Faculty Development. Dr. Sorensen’s research interests are in cancer prevention and control, worksite and community intervention research, and tobacco control and other health behaviors, in various multi- ethnic community settings. She has been principal investigator of multiple National Cancer Institute-funded projects focusing on cancer control in working class multiethnic populations. Her past IOM-NAS committee service includes the Committee to Assess Worksite Preventive Health Pro- gram Needs of NASA Employees (2004–2005), Committee on the Health and Safety Needs of Older Workers (2001–2005), Committee for Behavior Change in the 21st Century: Improving the Health of Diverse Populations (2000–2002), and Committee on Capitalizing on Social Science and Be- havioral Research to Improve the Public’s Health (1999–2000). She is the principal investigator for the Harvard School of Public Health Center for Work, Health, and Well-being and for the Massachusetts Cancer Preven- tion Community Research Network. Dr. Sorensen was recently awarded a research grant from the National Cancer Institute to study tobacco control among teachers in India, building on collaborations established through a Fulbright Award (2003–2004). She was a member of the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI’s) National 5-A-Day for Better Health External Advisory Group and a member of the NIH study section on Community Prevention and Control; she recently chaired several study sections for the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. In addition, Dr. Sorensen is a member of the editorial board for the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Bio- markers, and Preention, and she formerly served on the editorial boards of the American Journal of Health Promotion and the Journal of Health and Social Behaior. She received her Ph.D. degree from the University of Minnesota. ELIZABETH A. YETLEY, Ph.D., is a retired government scientist. Her career spans more than 28 years of government service including 24 years at the Food and Drug Administration culminating with her appointment as

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 STRATEGIES TO REDUCE SODIUM INTAKE lead scientist in nutrition. From 2004 until her retirement, she was a senior nutrition research scientist with the National Institutes of Health, Office of Dietary Supplements. Her leadership activities in the field of nutrition public health policy have been considerable and impactful. She has been re- sponsible for national food fortification programs, use of national nutrition monitoring and surveillance systems to support nutrition and food safety health policies, nutrition labeling including health claims to reduce sodium intakes, infant formula and medical food reviews and regulatory oversight, dietary supplement regulation, and the use of nutrient-related reference values in public health policy formulation. She has received more than 75 honors, commendations, and letters of recognition for her service and has served as a scientific representative for the U.S. government on more than 50 associations, panels, and committees. She has authored or coauthored approximately 100 scientific and peer-reviewed publications. Dr. Yetley re- ceived her Ph.D. in nutrition with a minor in biochemistry and physiology from Iowa State University.