E
Committee and Staff Biographical Information

LENNARD A. FISK, Chair, is the Thomas M. Donahue Distinguished University Professor of Space Science in the Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences at the University of Michigan. He is an active researcher in both theoretical and experimental studies of the solar atmosphere and its expansion into space to form the heliosphere. He was the associate administrator for space science and applications and chief scientist at NASA (1987-1993), and from 1977 to 1987 he served as professor of physics and vice president for research and financial affairs at the University of New Hampshire. Dr. Fisk is a member of the board of directors of the Orbital Sciences Corporation, cofounder of the Michigan Aerospace Corporation, and a former chair of the board of trustees of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). His prior National Research Council (NRC) service includes chair of the Space Studies Board, co-vice chair of the Committee on the Rationale and Goals of the U.S. Civil Space Program, and membership on the Committee on Scientific Communication and National Security, the Committee on Fusion Science Assessment, the Committee on International Space Programs, Air Force Physics Research Committee, and the Committee on Solar and Space Physics.


BRUCE H. MARGON, Vice Chair, is vice chancellor of research and professor of astronomy and astrophysics at the University of California, Santa Cruz. He was associate director for science at the Space Telescope Science Institute, and his own research has focused on high-energy astrophysics. He has been involved with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) project for 30 years and has worked for more than a decade as the founding chair of the board of governors of the Astrophysical Research Consortium, a nonprofit consortium that builds and operates innovative ground-based telescopes, including the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Dr. Margon served for many years on the board of directors of the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, including serving as chair (1995-1998). He has held faculty positions at the University of California at Los Angeles and the University of Washington, and he held an appointment as adjunct professor of physics and astronomy at Johns Hopkins University.


MARK R. ABBOTT is dean of the College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State University. His research focuses on the interaction of biological and physical processes in the upper ocean and relies on both remote-sensing and field observations. He deployed the first array of bio-optical moorings in the Southern Ocean as part of the United States Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (U.S. JGOFS). Dr. Abbott chairs the U.S. JGOFS Science Steering Committee, and he is also a member of the MODIS and SeaWiFS space remote sensing science teams. He is a member of the National Science Board and was a member of



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E Committee and Staff Biographical Information LENNARD A. FISK, Chair, is the Thomas M. Donahue Distinguished University Professor of Space Science in the Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences at the University of Michigan. He is an active researcher in both theoretical and experimental studies of the solar atmosphere and its expansion into space to form the heliosphere. He was the associate administrator for space science and applications and chief scientist at NASA (1987-1993), and from 1977 to 1987 he served as professor of physics and vice president for research and financial affairs at the University of New Hampshire. Dr. Fisk is a member of the board of directors of the Orbital Sciences Corporation, cofounder of the Michigan Aerospace Corporation, and a former chair of the board of trustees of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). His prior National Research Council (NRC) service includes chair of the Space Studies Board, co-vice chair of the Com- mittee on the Rationale and Goals of the U.S. Civil Space Program, and membership on the Committee on Scientific Communication and National Security, the Committee on Fusion Science Assessment, the Committee on Interna - tional Space Programs, Air Force Physics Research Committee, and the Committee on Solar and Space Physics. BRUCE H. MARGON, Vice Chair, is vice chancellor of research and professor of astronomy and astrophysics at the University of California, Santa Cruz. He was associate director for science at the Space Telescope Science Institute, and his own research has focused on high-energy astrophysics. He has been involved with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) project for 30 years and has worked for more than a decade as the founding chair of the board of governors of the Astrophysical Research Consortium, a nonprofit consortium that builds and operates inno- vative ground-based telescopes, including the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Dr. Margon served for many years on the board of directors of the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, including serving as chair (1995- 1998). He has held faculty positions at the University of California at Los Angeles and the University of Wash - ington, and he held an appointment as adjunct professor of physics and astronomy at Johns Hopkins University. MARK R. ABBOTT is dean of the College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State Univer- sity. His research focuses on the interaction of biological and physical processes in the upper ocean and relies on both remote-sensing and field observations. He deployed the first array of bio-optical moorings in the Southern Ocean as part of the United States Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (U.S. JGOFS). Dr. Abbott chairs the U.S. JGOFS Science Steering Committee, and he is also a member of the MODIS and SeaWiFS space remote sensing science teams. He is a member of the National Science Board and was a member of 60

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6 APPENDIX E the NRC Space Studies Board and chaired its Committee on Earth Studies. He most recently served on the Committee on NOAA-NESDIS Transition from Research to Operations and the Panel on Land-use Change, Ecosystem Dynamics, and Biodiversity of the Decadal Survey on Earth Science and Applications from Space. STEVEN J. BATTEL, a private consultant, was an engineer, researcher, and manager at the University of Michigan, Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley (UC Berkeley), and the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory prior to becoming president of Battel Engineering. At UC Berkeley, he was project manager for the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer Project. His company has provided engineering, development, and review services to NASA, DOD, university, and industrial clients. Areas of specialization include program management, systems engineering, advanced technology, ultraviolet optics, radio frequency communica - tions, spacecraft avionics, power systems, high-voltage systems, precision electronics, and scientific instrument design. Battel was a member of the HST External Readiness Review Team for SM-2, SM-3A, and SM-3B, the AXAF/Chandra Independent Assessment Team, the TDRS-H/I/J Independent Review Team, and the Mars Polar Lander Failure Review Board. He is former member of the National Solar Observatory’s Solar Observatory Council. He currently serves as a member of the NRC Space Studies Board and the Committee on Earth Studies. YVONNE C. BRILL is an independent consultant whose primary focus is aerospace technology and policy issues. Her specific research interests include rocket motors, launch vehicles for space application, and spacecraft (on- board) propulsion systems. She began her career with Douglas Aircraft as a rocket-propellant chemist on a project to design and launch an unmanned, Earth-orbiting satellite. Later at RCA Astro-Electronics, she developed the concept for a new rocket engine—an electrothermal hydrazine thruster. Ms. Brill is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), an honorary fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and a fellow of the Society of Women Engineers. She is a member of the Space Studies Board and has served on numerous NRC and NAE committees, including the Committee on Air Force/Department of Defense Aerospace Propulsion, the Committee on Strategic Assessment of Earth-to-Orbit Propulsion Options, and the Committee to Study the Advanced Solid Rocket Quality and Test Program. DONALD E. BROWNLEE is a professor of astronomy at the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle. His primary research interests focus on the origin and evolution of planetary materials, planets, and planetary sys - tems. He is extensively involved with the laboratory study of primitive materials from asteroids and comets, and he is the principal investigator of NASA’s Stardust comet sample return mission. He is also a member of the UW astrobiology program and has coauthored two books with UW paleontologist Peter Ward on Earth’s evolution to become a habitat for advanced life and on the remarkable aspects of the processes involved as viewed from the perspectives of space and time. He is a member of the NAS and served on the NRC Committee on Planetary and Lunar Exploration, the Space Studies Board, and the Study Team on Primitive Bodies. RICHARD CHAPAS is a senior marketing manager for environmental technologies at the Battelle Eastern Science and Technology Center. He was formerly director of industrial collaboration at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Prior to joining Battelle, he ran his own consulting business and worked for the following companies: Rayonier, vice president of research and development; Kimberly-Clark, senior R&D manager; John - son & Johnson, group leader; and Eastman Kodak, senior scientist. While operating his own business, he served as COO for Cara Plastics, a University of Delaware start-up company producing bio-based materials; industrial liaison for the Particle Engineering Research Center at the University of Florida; technical consultant for Well - man, which is a producer and recycler of polyester fiber; and strategic consultant for Lysac, a Canadian start-up producing bio-based superabsorbents. He is a member of the Industrial Research Institute, where he has served as chair for subcommittees on knowledge management and research on research, and he is also a board member for the Center for Sustainable Enterprise at the Kenan-Flagler Business School at the University of North Carolina. MARTIN H. ISRAEL is a professor of physics at Washington University. He was principal investigator of the Heavy Nuclei Experiment on the HEAO-3 satellite and a coinvestigator on the Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder high-

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6 AN ENABLING FOUNDATION FOR NASA’S EARTH AND SPACE SCIENCE MISSIONS altitude balloon experiment, which had two successful flights. Dr. Israel also works on analysis of data from the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer on the Advanced Composition Explorer spacecraft and on the Antarctic Impul - sive Transient Antenna, a balloon-borne instrument that studies extremely high-energy neutrinos. He is the recipient of NASA Exceptional Scientific Achievement Award (1980) and serves as chair of NASA Scientific Ballooning Roadmap Team. Dr. Israel was a member of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Space Science Visiting Com - mittee, the Director’s Visiting Committee, and the NASA Structure and Evolution of the Universe Subcommittee. CONILEE G. KIRKPATRICK is vice president of HRL Laboratories, LLC (the former Hughes Research Labo - ratories) in Malibu, California. She is the senior technical executive at HRL where she guides a broad spectrum of research and development programs for HRL’s members and government and commercial customers. Before joining HRL, Dr. Kirkpatrick was a senior scientist at Science Applications International Corporation. She has served as a member of the Defense Sciences Research Council, the National Institute of Standards and Technol - ogy Visiting Industrial Scientist Committee, the Main Group of the Advisory Group on Electron Devices to the Office of the Undersecretary of Defense, Acquisition, and Technology. She has served as a reviewer for the Naval Research Laboratory’s Electronics program and the Office of Basic Research Review of 6.1 DOD programs. Other advisory roles have included membership on the Electrochemical Society Electronics Division Executive Council, the Device Research Conference Committee, and the NRC National Materials Advisory Board Committee on Beam Technologies. She currently serves on the University of California Micro Policy Board and the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Electronics, Electro-Optics, and Optics Industrial Advisory Board. JENNIFER A. LOGAN is a senior research fellow in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Har- vard University. Her research uses global models and analyses of atmospheric data to improve understanding of the processes affecting atmospheric composition, and hence climate, and the changes wrought by human activity. She has published extensively on trends in ozone. A particular focus of current research is analysis of tropospheric data from the Aura satellite. She is a member of the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer science team and is on the steering committee of the Global Modeling Initiative. She is a fellow of the American Geo - physical Union and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Her prior NRC service includes membership on the Board of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, the Committee to Assess the North American Research Strategy for the Tropospheric Ozone Program, and the Committee on Atmospheric Chemistry. ROBYN MILLAN is an assistant professor of physics and astronomy at Dartmouth College. Her research includes the use of high-altitude scientific balloon experiments to study Earth’s radiation belts, specifically the loss of relativistic electrons from the outer radiation belts into Earth’s atmosphere. Dr. Millan is principal investigator for the Balloon Array for RBSP Relativistic Electron Losses project, which is being planned for flight in association with the Radiation Belt Storm Probe mission. Her prior positions include research appointments at Dartmouth University and at UC Berkeley. RICHARD R. PAUL served from 2000 to 2007 as vice president for Strategic Development and Analysis in Phan - tom Works at the Boeing Company. In 2006 and 2007, he concurrently served in the office of the Boeing chief technology officer. During his Air Force career, he served in three Air Force laboratories (AF Weapons Labora - tory, Wright Laboratory, and the AFRL), a product center (Electronic Systems Center), and two major command headquarters (HQ Strategic Air Command and HQ Air Force Materiel Command). Major General Paul served as commander of Wright Laboratory and its predecessor organizations from 1988 to 1992. In his last assignment, from 1997 to 2000, he served as the Air Force Technology executive officer and as the commander of AFRL. He is the past chair of the Industrial Research Institute and is currently a member of the Air Force Air University Board of Visitors, an adviser to the Sandia National Laboratories board of directors Missions Committee, and a member of the National Science Foundation (NSF) Small Business Innovation Research Advisory Committee. He was a member of the NRC Air Force Studies Board and has been an ad hoc adviser to the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board.

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6 APPENDIX E GUENTER RIEGLER retired from NASA in 2005 after serving for 3 years as the director of science at the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). His research experience is in x-ray astrophysics. Before joining ARC Dr. Riegler was assistant associate administrator for space science at NASA headquarters where his responsibilities included oversight of the office’s mission-enabling research programs and the mission and data operations for space flight missions. Prior positions included research appointments at the California Institute of Technology, Bendix Aero - space, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. MARK V. SYKES is the CEO and director of the Planetary Science Institute in Tucson, Arizona. His research interests include the origin and evolution of dust in the solar system, cometary dust trails, the collisional production of dust in the asteroid belt, and the compositional gradient in the early solar system and the heating and dynamical processes by which that gradient evolved. He is a member of the Dawn asteroid mission science team and is chair of the NASA Small Bodies Assessment Group. He is a fellow of the AAAS, a former chair of the American Astro - nomical Society of the Pacific, a former chair of the Astronomy and Astrophysics Society Division for Planetary Sciences (AAS/DPS), and a former member of the NASA-NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Commit - tee. During his service in the AAS/DPS, he initiated statistical analyses of NASA planetary science research and analysis programs that are relevant to the tasks of this committee. Staff JOSEPH K. ALEXANDER, Study Director, served previously as director of the Space Studies Board (1998-2005), deputy assistant administrator for science in the Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Research and Devel - opment (1994-1998), associate director of space sciences at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (1993-1994), and assistant associate administrator for space sciences and applications in the NASA Office of Space Science and Applications (1987-1993). Other positions have included deputy NASA chief scientist and senior policy analyst at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. Mr. Alexander’s own research work has been in radio astronomy and space physics. He received B.S. and M.A. degrees in physics from the College of William and Mary. CARMELA J. CHAMBERLAIN, administrative coordinator, has worked for the National Academies since 1974. She started as a senior project assistant at the Institute for Laboratory Animals for Research, which is now a board in the Division on Earth and Life Sciences, where she worked for 2 years, then transferred to the Space Science Board, which is now the SSB. She has previously served as a senior program assistant and as a program associate with the SSB. CATHERINE A. GRUBER, editor, joined the SSB as a senior program assistant in 1995. Ms. Gruber first came to the NRC in 1988 as a senior secretary for the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board and also worked as an outreach assistant for the National Science Resources Center. She was a research assistant (chemist) in the National Institute of Mental Health’s Laboratory of Cell Biology for 2 years. She has a B.A. in natural science from St. Mary’s College of Maryland. VICTORIA SWISHER, research associate, served with the SSB from 2006 until 2009. She supported studies and workshops on civil space policy, the Beyond Einstein program, NASA workforce, Mars research, research enabled by the lunar environment, ITAR, and other topics. Before joining the SSB, she performed research in x- ray astronomy and laboratory astrophysics, which included studying the x-rays of plasma and culminated in her senior thesis, “Modeling UV and X-ray Spectra from the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment.” She graduated from Swarthmore College with a major in astronomy and a minor in English literature. LINDA M. WALKER is a senior program assistant with the SSB. She has been with the National Academies since September 2007. Before joining the SSB she worked with the National Academies Press. She has 28 years of administrative experience.

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